The Movie Thread

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
Not sure if you guys saw Rambo 5 but I rewatched it with my brother. I thoroughly enjoy this movie, my favorite Rambo film followed by Rambo 4. I just get a kick out of the violence and that its shedding light on some dark issues doesn't hurt either. No wonder the leftists hated this film.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Not sure if you guys saw Rambo 5 but I rewatched it with my brother. I thoroughly enjoy this movie, my favorite Rambo film followed by Rambo 4. I just get a kick out of the violence and that its shedding light on some dark issues doesn't hurt either. No wonder the leftists hated this film.

Rambo 1 is clearly the best. I haven't seen Rambo 5, but I'm guessing they used an excessive amount of cuts.

I'm about halfway through a podcast with Tarantino and Edgar Wright. They've listed about 1000 movies so I think I'll dig into some of those. Some that piqued my interest were Green Heaven and the Guns at Batasi. Here's the whole list of movies mentioned in the podcast:

 

Cuchulainn2016

Woodpecker
Rambo 1 is clearly the best. I haven't seen Rambo 5, but I'm guessing they used an excessive amount of cuts.

I'm about halfway through a podcast with Tarantino and Edgar Wright. They've listed about 1000 movies so I think I'll dig into some of those. Some that piqued my interest were Green Heaven and the Guns at Batasi. Here's the whole list of movies mentioned in the podcast:

Guns at Batasi is really good.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Guns at Batasi is really good.
I finally had a Guns at Batasi torrent complete downloading. What a solid movie. Very British. And the way Richard Attenborough plays the Sergeant Major so hung up on etiquette is pretty funny. Everyone sees the guy as a joke, but when it all goes down he's the guy you want leading.

Also watched a British movie mentioned by Tarantino called "Strong Room." Three dudes rob a bank, but things go awry and they have a hard choice to make. You can watch the whole thing on youtube.

 

kel

Ostrich
Looking for a recommendation for a documentary on Shintoism - something on youtube is fine, or something I can torrent. I want to both understand it but also I'm looking for a certain Japanese animist aesthetic in the film itself, too. Does such a thing exist?
 

stugatz

Pelican
I finally saw Mortal Kombat 1995 the other month. I wasn't too impressed, but as far as video game movies go I enjoyed it enough - it was a lot of fun. I always wondered why they didn't just make it R, though. The series isn't known to hold back with the violence.

Looks like this one will let loose a little more. I hope, though, they don't go too far - I got annoyed at the endless parade of gorier horror remakes released in the early aughts. (The original Black Christmas was actually pretty low-key as far as violence went, and could have probably gotten away with a PG had they trimmed it just a little. That remake, though, ick.)
 

tothepoint

Woodpecker
Saw The King (2019) recently. There are some historical inaccuracies as far as Henry V is concerned but the recreation of Agincourt was very well done. It's probably the closest thing to how people fought in the mud and grime while wearing heavy armor. The main actor will also star in the upcoming Dune, he looks like a kid but gives a solid performance. I recommend it.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Hitchcock - Vertigo to me is his best. And of course Psycho. 39 Steps is an early, pre-war work that conspiracy theorists would enjoy.
Uh oh, let me try to keep this to a brief post. I had a Hitchcock phase in high school. I always liked Rear Window best from that classic era of his - Vertigo was one that never appealed to me as much, but I can see why it's so well thought of. 39 Steps I liked so much, it got me into very old (pre-1940) movies for a while.

I've always been a fan of limited-set and small cast films - if you haven't seen them, Rope and Lifeboat are easily two of my favorites of his that seem to have been forgotten.

His stuff post-Psycho, is very interesting and I've grown to appreciate some of them over the years (Frenzy in particular - it's very different from anything else he made). The critics didn't like them much, but I guess he got old enough where he figured OK, let's try some new stuff.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
Farewell My Lovely (1975)

Remake of the original based on the Raymond Chandler novel. Robert Mitchum makes for a solid Marlowe, albeit a little too old. Better than The Long Goodbye, in my opinion. Just more noirish. Great atmosphere and dialogue. If you liked Chinatown you'll probably like this.
 

stugatz

Pelican

I watched "Coming 2 America" last night - nobody really wanted or asked for a sequel to the original, but it's one of my favorite 80s comedies and I just had to see it out of morbid curiosity.

It's not really half bad. It's mediocre at best, but much of what I was afraid of isn't present. Only one or two brief woke jabs that are very easy to miss, and any feminazi bullcrap I was expecting is pretty muted. (The movie seemed to have to decide "well, it's current year - do we criticize Zamunda's extremely patriarchal and traditional culture, or do we give it a pass because it's a fictitious black country?)

Sadly, Leslie Jones (that obnoxious black SNL actress nobody thinks is funny) is in it, and a main character. She's really not all that funny, but the character she plays is actually perfect for the role and isn't nearly as cringey as I expected.
 

I watched "Coming 2 America" last night - nobody really wanted or asked for a sequel to the original, but it's one of my favorite 80s comedies and I just had to see it out of morbid curiosity.

It's not really half bad. It's mediocre at best, but much of what I was afraid of isn't present. Only one or two brief woke jabs that are very easy to miss, and any feminazi bullcrap I was expecting is pretty muted. (The movie seemed to have to decide "well, it's current year - do we criticize Zamunda's extremely patriarchal and traditional culture, or do we give it a pass because it's a fictitious black country?)

Sadly, Leslie Jones (that obnoxious black SNL actress nobody thinks is funny) is in it, and a main character. She's really not all that funny, but the character she plays is actually perfect for the role and isn't nearly as cringey as I expected.

I saw it yesterday, and it was entertaining but nowhere near as good as the first.

I also saw the progressive propaganda in it, during the interview scene, the barbershop scene ("Obama united us" crap like blm/modern antifa didn't start under his watch), and the rejection of tradition like you mentioned, the patriarchy.
 
I saw it yesterday, and it was entertaining but nowhere near as good as the first.

I also saw the progressive propaganda in it, during the interview scene, the barbershop scene ("Obama united us" crap like blm/modern antifa didn't start under his watch), and the rejection of tradition like you mentioned, the patriarchy.
Started watching it, and made it about 5 minutes. I only gave it a shot because the original was so damn good. Also, the previews didn’t show any Princess Akeem’s. I thought to myself maybe it’s not really woke? Wrong. Instead there were 3 princesses and they were all ninjas that bested their King with a staff in less then 5-10 minutes into the movie. Click
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
Just watched “The King” last night. Overall it was enjoyable: Well written ( co written by Mochod who directed it and Joel Edgerton who co starred in it) well acted, cinematography was good and fight choreography came across as realistic which was refreshing. My only complaint would be I had a hard time buying that bird chested manlet that played Henry as capable of killing a six pack of beer much less another man
 

OrthoLeaf

Sparrow
Saw The King (2019) recently. There are some historical inaccuracies as far as Henry V is concerned but the recreation of Agincourt was very well done. It's probably the closest thing to how people fought in the mud and grime while wearing heavy armor. The main actor will also star in the upcoming Dune, he looks like a kid but gives a solid performance. I recommend it.
The single volley of arrows shot at a distance in a overhead arc and the infantry walking out into the middle of the field and receiving the full brunt of a cavalry charge while the archers were just chillin in the back, was pretty silly. Their portrayal of the brutal melee was well done but everything else was way off. (I've always loved history, particularly military history, so these things bother me.)

Things that needed to be, and realistically could have been changed to make this scene excellent:
-English army positioned with trees covering both flanks
-Archers on the flanks, protected with sharpened wooden stakes and treeline protecting their flanks
-French cavalry charge hit with arrows shot on a straight line (not in an arc) and shot at near point blank range
-This stalls the charge before it reaches English line
-Chaos ensues as front tries to retreat, while rear continues its charge
-French retreat, dismount and attack again on foot, forced to trudge their way through muddy field in plate armor
-Forced into tightly packed mess due to arrows from the flanks; packed so tightly they cannot swing their weapons
-Brutal melee ensues as portrayed in the film, but more one sided
-Archers join melee, less susceptible to mud due to lighter armor
-Resounding victory for English


...But at least they got the armor right, which is a huge step up from the average film. My biggest pet peeve is watching a king run into battle at the head of a disorganized mob, on foot, helmet-less and with only leather armor for protection and then watching 5 min of slow-mo chaotic 1-1 fighting (cue dramatic scene with protagonist looking over the disorganized battlefield)... and don't even get me started about the ol' "lines of fire" trick, which is used to portray a "clever" strategist.
 

Papist

Robin
I've just finished watching Mel Gibson's The Passion of Christ on Amazon Prime (UK), as it leaves soon. It's an absolutely tremendous film, though I can't help but think he over does the scourging. Obviously Jesus could be said to have supernatural strength, but could any man survive that? It's too protracted, and I just think it detracts from the film slightly.

The scene where Pontius Pilate washes his hands and proclaims that he's innocent of Jesus' killing is subtitled, but the Pharisee's response - which I'm sure I don't need to quote - is not subtitled. I wonder if anybody who has the DVD can confirm whether that particular line is subtitled? Or is Amazon censoring it?
 
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