The Movie Thread

stugatz

Pelican
My only gripe with the movie was when he either allegedly played gay or faked gay to get away from the authorities once in France, its implied he did, I like to think he was pretending to make the gay think he would later and didn't, but my fears were soon remedied when he relieved the crooked croissant he was staying with of his life. Interesting how older movies show deviancy for what it really is, deviancy and perversion. Everything else was fantastic with the film.
The book goes a lot farther with it - he meets the dude in a bath-house and ends up dressing in drag at one point to avoid the cops (it's actually a brilliant idea, they're too disgusted to ever suspect him, and say "you faggots are disgusting" when giving their car a half-serious once-over).

The author (Frederick Forsyth) has always been a right-winger, so this read to me loud and clear as a pretty obvious condemnation.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
Went to the local theater last Friday and saw NOBODY


Nobody.jpg


Was pleasantly surprised as it was actually really pretty darn good. The plot is simple and not full of unnecessary turns. The fight choreography is superb, (same guys that do John Wick) and Bob Odenkirk does a really believable turn as a sort of every-man with a hidden past and dormant "skills".

One pivotal scene takes place on a city bus where he fights 5 guys. As he's getting his ass kicked you can actually see his transformation as each time he gets hit it awakens something long suppressed.

Basically its a viscerally satisfying outlet for current social frustrations to finally see someone fighting back and kicking the asses of those that deserve it

8/10
 
Been on a bit of a Shakespeare binge, recently watched Much Ado About Nothing and currently watching The Taming Of The Shrew. Hollywood used to produce high-quality content, it's nothing like what they put out nowadays.
 

Fenaroli

Robin
I haven't seen a movie in the cinema for a long time (I think Tenet was the last one). My wife truly enjoys the movie-going experience and she drags me to see movies, but it has to be in the cinema and with snacks. Marriage is a wonderful thing, I guess that's why it's considered a sacrament.

I am VERY excited to see Mel Gibson's upcoming Resurrection sequel to the Passion of the Christ. I held out watching it for a long time when I was an agnostic, but since returning to Christianity, Passion's become my favorite movie of all time.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
The local theaters here have all gone "luxury" Our favorite is one where the seats are all paired leather recliners, with a light and server call button in the arm rest / end table. Its like flying first class. They have a full dinner menu and bar with cocktails, wine and even rotating taps craft draft beers. I usually bring my own nice bottle of wine and pay a small corkage.

TheLot_Auditorium.jpg




They also have a big upscale lobby with multi big screen TV display. Good place to hang with friends after a movie

the-lot-fashion-island.jpg


Overall it makes the experience of escaping for a few hours a lot more enjoyable

Going to the movie theater has always been something Ive enjoyed. Probably because of memories of my father taking us to the movies on Saturdays when I was a kid
 
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Just finished The Taming Of The Shrew, with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. I'd be shocked if there's a single man on these boards who won't find the story and its execution to be excellent.
 

DeWoken

Robin
I'm definitely going to have to re-watch Day of the Jackal now. I was only a teenager when I first saw it.

Nobody was solid entertainment, as expected.

@MichaelWitcoff , hmm it's been a while since I have seen any Shakespeare, it might be time:like:

I came across the 1971 film Vanishing Point in an article about top car movies. I was able to make it through the whole thing so that's a thumbs up, but it was kind of unsatisfying. It was a fun look back into the past. Lots of vrooom!
 

LightofApollo

Sparrow
Woman
Just finished The Taming Of The Shrew, with Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. I'd be shocked if there's a single man on these boards who won't find the story and its execution to be excellent.
Have you seen Gandalf's version of Richard III? It was a 90's release valve for fear of the coming fascist wave. Everyone thought that the fascism would flow in from the "Right." So many pants being caught in a state of undress...

I think the best Shakespeare adaptation was Sir Lawrence Olivier's Othello. He was basically the Kirk Lazarus of his day. Complete and utter commitment, critics be damned. That sort of chutzpah is being "nipped in the bud" out of the genpop as we speak.

It sounds like you're sticking to his comedies right now, though. Keanu Reeves WAS the bomb in MAAN, yo! Taming of the Shrew is my favorite Shakespeare comedy, hands down, so I have no better recommendation from his comedies.

If you're into sci-fi Shakespeare, Forbidden Planet is an excellent adaptation of the Tempest. Albeit aged, but saved by whoever it was who played Prospero, and there's a surprise actor in there that you may find quite the treat, given our closeness in age and cultural awareness.
 

kel

Ostrich
The local theaters here have all gone "luxury" Our favorite is one where the seats are all paired leather recliners, with a light and server call button in the arm rest / end table. Its like flying first class. They have a full dinner menu and bar with cocktails, wine and even rotating taps craft draft beers. I usually bring my own nice bottle of wine and pay a small corkage.

TheLot_Auditorium.jpg




They also have a big upscale lobby with multi big screen TV display. Good place to hang with friends after a movie

the-lot-fashion-island.jpg


Overall it makes the experience of escaping for a few hours a lot more enjoyable

Going to the movie theater has always been something Ive enjoyed. Probably because of memories of my father taking us to the movies on Saturdays when I was a kid
I think all the ones that are surviving are doing this, or at least doing some kind of dinner type thing (like the famous Alamo Drafthouse). Otherwise it's tough to attract people. I don't watch much stuff to begin with, so I'm a bad point of reference, but besides getting taken to the cinema when visiting my parents I basically never go. I've got a good stereo system and a good but entry-level projector - all combined maybe $1000 (stereo stuff mostly used quality stuff at 1/3 the price new), it really pays for itself quickly.
 

Papaya

Peacock
Gold Member
I think all the ones that are surviving are doing this, or at least doing some kind of dinner type thing (like the famous Alamo Drafthouse). Otherwise it's tough to attract people. I don't watch much stuff to begin with, so I'm a bad point of reference, but besides getting taken to the cinema when visiting my parents I basically never go. I've got a good stereo system and a good but entry-level projector - all combined maybe $1000 (stereo stuff mostly used quality stuff at 1/3 the price new), it really pays for itself quickly.
Yeah Im just a nostalgic hold out I guess. Ive always been a film buff though. (One film class in college was the only non engineering course I treated myself to).

I just like the whole experience of going to the movies. Gotta have the popcorn too even though its a little gross
 

DeWoken

Robin
I have a confession to make: I've started watching musicals
:D:hmm:
Well, at least I watched a couple classics from my childhood (my parents' childhood really). Since Christopher Plummer died I thought I'd re-watch The Sound of Music. It took me a few days of watching snippets, but generally I enjoyed it and found it to be a good mood adjuster for a single guy living a somewhat isolated existence (and riding the Chastity Wagon). It is a bit "saccharine" as they say, but after watching TSoM you can definitely understand why it was a worldwide smash hit. There are solid Christian elements to it as well. Plummer did a great job filling out what could have been a cardboard character - RIP. A 20-something Julie Andrews is beautiful.

Then I watched My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. (I think they're both 1964 productions. Strangely enough Andrews played Eliza in the stage production of MFL, across from Harrison, but was passed over for the film role because she was too unknown(!). This freed her up for her role in TSoM, so it was a win.). Good tunes and very entertaining. Marnie Nixon was the ghost voice for Hepburn.

There are a few more musicals that I watched in childhood that I want to check out again - this time in widescreen, with stereo sound and no bits edited out for TV! And I'm going to have to check out a couple Hepburn romantic comedies from the fifties.

Someone at the NSA right now:
Sir, we've done it! All the stress from these hoaxes has turned the nazis gey! They're watching musicals ... and a third of the board is subscribed to the WFPBD thread!
;)
 

stugatz

Pelican
I have a confession to make: I've started watching musicals
:D:hmm:
Well, at least I watched a couple classics from my childhood (my parents' childhood really). Since Christopher Plummer died I thought I'd re-watch The Sound of Music. It took me a few days of watching snippets, but generally I enjoyed it and found it to be a good mood adjuster for a single guy living a somewhat isolated existence (and riding the Chastity Wagon). It is a bit "saccharine" as they say, but after watching TSoM you can definitely understand why it was a worldwide smash hit. There are solid Christian elements to it as well. Plummer did a great job filling out what could have been a cardboard character - RIP. A 20-something Julie Andrews is beautiful.

Then I watched My Fair Lady with Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison. (I think they're both 1964 productions. Strangely enough Andrews played Eliza in the stage production of MFL, across from Harrison, but was passed over for the film role because she was too unknown(!). This freed her up for her role in TSoM, so it was a win.). Good tunes and very entertaining. Marnie Nixon was the ghost voice for Hepburn.

There are a few more musicals that I watched in childhood that I want to check out again - this time in widescreen, with stereo sound and no bits edited out for TV! And I'm going to have to check out a couple Hepburn romantic comedies from the fifties.

Someone at the NSA right now:
Sir, we've done it! All the stress from these hoaxes has turned the nazis gey! They're watching musicals ... and a third of the board is subscribed to the WFPBD thread!
;)
No problem there. Some musicals like Singin' in the Rain are so good, you almost forget you're watching one.

I've always hated Sound of Music and trolled people by saying that Mary Poppins and Victor/Victoria are far less gay in comparison.

(Full disclosure, I usually dislike musicals but have had a Gilbert and Sullivan fixation for years - their operettas have enough 1870s camp and kitsch value where it negates all of my usual problems with the genre. That 1980s Pirates of Penzance movie with Kevin Kline is a pretty faithful adaptation of the operetta.)

EDIT: For anyone unfamiliar with Gilbert and Sullivan, they have a fantastically politically incorrect operetta called "The Mikado". It takes place in Japan, and all the roles are supposed to be played by whites in yellowface. The names of the characters are Nanki-Poo, Ko-Ko, Yum-Yum, and Pish-Tush. Maybe it's too obscure to get touched by cancel culture.)
 
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Pacífico

Chicken
Mishima: a Life in 4 Chapters(1985) by Paul Schrader is one of the best films I've seen. It's a very experimental/artistic film about the life of Yukio Mishima, the most celebrated Japanese author of the 50's and 60's. 10/10 for me.
 

DeWoken

Robin
For some reason I've never seen SitR, and never even heard of V/V or Gilbert and Sullivan. It's always interesting to see how little you know about something when you feel you have learned a good amount :) Looking at the AFI's top 25 I've seen about a third of them.


You have to wonder how these are selected, though. With TSoM's Christian elements it's not hard to imagine it getting shoved down, even though the nazis are the bad guys in it. So far Marry Poppins, while obviously being of high quality, is harder to watch, it lacks the universal appeal the two musicals I mentioned, being more of a straight-up kids movie. My family was mostly into the British, non-fantasy musicals.

I am interested in checking out film to do with Japan, thanks for the heads up :like:

No problem there. Some musicals like Singin' in the Rain are so good, you almost forget you're watching one.

I've always hated Sound of Music and trolled people by saying that Mary Poppins and Victor/Victoria are far less gay in comparison.
 

Maddox

Sparrow
The local theaters here have all gone "luxury" Our favorite is one where the seats are all paired leather recliners, with a light and server call button in the arm rest / end table. Its like flying first class. They have a full dinner menu and bar with cocktails, wine and even rotating taps craft draft beers. I usually bring my own nice bottle of wine and pay a small corkage.

TheLot_Auditorium.jpg




They also have a big upscale lobby with multi big screen TV display. Good place to hang with friends after a movie

the-lot-fashion-island.jpg


Overall it makes the experience of escaping for a few hours a lot more enjoyable

Going to the movie theater has always been something Ive enjoyed. Probably because of memories of my father taking us to the movies on Saturdays when I was a kid

Is there really a server bringing people food and drinks during the movie? I imagine that would get very annoying for everyone else.
 

stugatz

Pelican
For some reason I've never seen SitR, and never even heard of V/V or Gilbert and Sullivan. It's always interesting to see how little you know about something when you feel you have learned a good amount :) Looking at the AFI's top 25 I've seen about a third of them.


You have to wonder how these are selected, though. With TSoM's Christian elements it's not hard to imagine it getting shoved down, even though the nazis are the bad guys in it. So far Marry Poppins, while obviously being of high quality, is harder to watch, it lacks the universal appeal the two musicals I mentioned, being more of a straight-up kids movie. My family was mostly into the British, non-fantasy musicals.

I am interested in checking out film to do with Japan, thanks for the heads up :like:
Singin' in the Rain is just great stuff even if you don't like musicals. Victor/Victoria is pretty degenerate to be honest (it has a massive gay fanbase), but I guess give it a watch if you like Julie Andrews - the music is very good and the script is clever. I liked it way more when I was a liberal.

My problem with Sound of Music really isn't that the Nazis are cartoonish bad guys - most movies since 1945 have done that and I've gotten used to it. I just don't like how sappy and saccharine it is, and I usually cringe all the way through it. Also, it's laughable that they portrayed Austria as unwilling to go along with the Anschluss - sure, they were strong-armed into it and had no real choice, but I'm convinced well over three quarters of that country liked Hitler enthusiastically. (In comparison, Mary Poppins has pretty intelligent social commentary when it comes to 1910 England and what led to WWI, and it's for a much younger audience.)
 

DeWoken

Robin
Is there really a server bringing people food and drinks during the movie? I imagine that would get very annoying for everyone else.

I've never experienced it myself but that sounds like a good time. People are naturally wired to find a certain level of stimulation - including somewhat distracting elements - to be pleasing, I think. Why should the movie theatre be a bugman haven? If you are out in public there should be some friction, warmth, and heat to let you know it. Public masturbation should be proscribed.

Serious movies would attract a more serious crowd. When getting your popcorn you might eye up your fellow movie goers and maybe interact a little. If you see someone who might present a problem you make a note of it.

My problem with Sound of Music really isn't that the Nazis are cartoonish bad guys - most movies since 1945 have done that and I've gotten used to it. I just don't like how sappy and saccharine it is, and I usually cringe all the way through it. Also, it's laughable that they portrayed Austria as unwilling to go along with the Anschluss - sure, they were strong-armed into it and had no real choice, but I'm convinced well over three quarters of that country liked Hitler enthusiastically. (In comparison, Mary Poppins has pretty intelligent social commentary when it comes to 1910 England and what led to WWI, and it's for a much younger audience.)

Yes, in truth Uncle Addie had many fans. I had to fast-forward through "my favorite things". Okay then, I'll try and finish MP. It's pretty funny how the wife is this strident suffragette but when her husband is around she's submissive :squintlol: It should have been a warning to men of that time.
 

Kiwi

Pigeon
A Hidden Life.

Phenomenal film. Very moving and captivating in the story telling, themes, cinematography and characters. Especially given the truth of the story both historically and in the post truth of today.

a quote from the film;

"What we do, is just create... sympathy. We create-- We create admirers. We don't create followers. Christ's life is a demand. You don't want to be reminded of it. So we don't have to see what happens to the truth. A darker time is coming... when men will be more clever. They won't fight the truth, they'll just ignore it. I paint their comfortable Christ, with a halo over his head. How can I show what I haven't lived? Someday I might have the courage to venture, not yet. Someday I'll... I'll paint the true Christ."
 

kazz

Kingfisher
Nobody is a good movie, I was not expecting it to be so good. Funny its ex special forces takes on Russian mafia same as Equalizer and John Wick.
 

Maddox

Sparrow
I've never experienced it myself but that sounds like a good time. People are naturally wired to find a certain level of stimulation - including somewhat distracting elements - to be pleasing, I think. Why should the movie theatre be a bugman haven? If you are out in public there should be some friction, warmth, and heat to let you know it. Public masturbation should be proscribed.

If servers are walking up and down the aisles, they're probably also blocking site lines to the screen. And people are already annoyed at those who use cell phones during movies. It would seem these theaters with patrons talking back and forth with the servers would present more of these annoyances.
 
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