The Movie Thread

DeWoken

Robin
(I always wonder why he got forgiven, did he grovel and promise he'd never say it again or something?)
I have heard it said that Mel hasn't produced any good movies since his drunk fiasco.

Where the heck are the Chinese and Russian movies already? Anti-ZOG places are not skillful at winning hearts and minds :confused: Edit: and I mean, why can't blacklisted talent collaborate with them?
 
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stugatz

Pelican
Hacksaw Ridge was good but not great (at least I thought so).

I think he's working on a sequel to The Passion with the same actor who played Jesus...I'm wondering how that's even going to work, it's been almost two decades since the movie came out, and he's (I think) portraying Jesus walking the earth for 40 days after his resurrection.

If he's for sure doing it, I hope he doesn't water it down to please Hollywood - they really didn't like that The Passion did as well as it did.
 

Maddox

Robin
I have heard it said that Mel hasn't produced any good movies since his drunk fiasco.

Where the heck are the Chinese and Russian movies already? Anti-ZOG places are not skillful at winning hearts and minds :confused: Edit: and I mean, why can't blacklisted talent collaborate with them?

I never understood why Mel couldn't work for others while (((the studio heads))) put him on a 10-year hiatus from directing. I mean, I get that A-List producers didn't want to sacrifice their careers, but you'd think that successful indie producers who don't rely on Hollywood for jobs would want to work with him. And Mel needed the work.

In that 10 years time, it looks like all he did was take the occasional small acting gig.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
I remember seeing that one I think in late 2018. I thought it was very solid (and it's nice to see a WWII movie that focuses on the Pacific) but not particularly great. I think it just got overly praised because Mel Gibson finally got forgiven by Hollywood after those comments he made in the 2000s, and is now making movies again. (I always wonder why he got forgiven, did he grovel and promise he'd never say it again or something?)

Gibson has directed some good stuff and doesn't get enough recognition (Braveheart, The Passion). I need to see Apocalypto.

Braveheart won 5 oscars and made a bunch of money. If anything, I think it's overrated.

Passion made even more money. Gibson financed it mostly on his own, so he ended up pocketing 400 million. Not bad for a religious R rated movie with subtitles. At one point Gibson was nearly a billionaire. I think his wife got around 400 million in the divorce.

If there's one Gibson movie to see, it's Apocalypto. Tarantino and Scorsese have hailed it as brilliant.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Braveheart won 5 oscars and made a bunch of money. If anything, I think it's overrated.

Passion made even more money. Gibson financed it mostly on his own, so he ended up pocketing 400 million. Not bad for a religious R rated movie with subtitles. At one point Gibson was nearly a billionaire. I think his wife got around 400 million in the divorce.

If there's one Gibson movie to see, it's Apocalypto. Tarantino and Scorsese have hailed it as brilliant.
Thing is, I don't remember people talking about Braveheart much past the 1990s - if anything, people remember The Patriot better. It's one of those Best Picture winners that faded quickly, and I think it's definitely better than that.

That "Man Without A Face" flick from the early 1990s is also directed by him, I didn't know until the other day. It's pretty good (but you could miss it, there are so many other better movies).
 

renotime

Ostrich
Gold Member
I'd have to disagree. William Wallace screaming freedom just won't die. There were a lot of parodies on it. Without Braveheart you probably don't get The Patriot. There really weren't a lot of sword and shield movies prior to Braveheart and there were a bunch of them in the 90s and early 2000s.

I found Braveheart and The Patriot to be middling and cheesy, albeit entertaining.

While it is debatable on whether or not Braveheart or Patriot have lived on, it's hard to argue against Gladiator, which I don't get. The only thing that move had going for it was Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix's performances. I watched it again in the last year and I still don't get it.
 
What makes or breaks a movie in the end usually is the edit. Braveheart has an extended cut that was never released, likely filled in all the gaps that made its grand plot look a little delirious in the theatrical cut, though it is a good film in the vein of not promoting degeneracy, it shows it and it is all viewed in a negative light, though I'm not sure if it tries to get the audience to sympathize with the King's faggy prince son or make us feel disgusted with it, but I know what my default reaction was, and how I smirk every time I recall longshanks tossing his homo lover out the castle window, and he states the obvious situation at which the outside world views whites this present day, weak effeminate and gay: a ripe target for invasion: "And not my gentle son, the mere sight of him will only encourage an enemy to takeover the whole country."
 

DeWoken

Robin
I'd have to disagree. William Wallace screaming freedom just won't die. There were a lot of parodies on it. Without Braveheart you probably don't get The Patriot. There really weren't a lot of sword and shield movies prior to Braveheart and there were a bunch of them in the 90s and early 2000s.
Yes, Braveheart lives on. It's been a few years since I've re-watched it, I remember that the story is a bit twisty-windy.

Braveheart has an extended cut that was never released
It sure would be nice for it to see the light of day.

I don't think anyone is making the case that Mel is the greatest actor or director that ever lived, just that he obviously loves freedom and made pretty good movies.

I like Gladiator, but like many here, I am cutting back on violence and gore in my viewing. I was pleasantly surprised by the additional scenes in the extended cut.

I have a very soft spot for Kirsten and Marie Antoinette. Sweet film and I'm still impressed how well it came together style-wise. They went bold with it and that's why it worked. Just like Luhrman's Romeo + Juliet.
I'd like to correct myself: after re-watching Marie Antoinette I agree, it is a worthwhile film. My complaint is just that it left me hungry for details - but there is only so much you can pack into an engaging 1.5hr movie.

For instance, I was not aware that Antoinette married to Louis when she was 14 and he 15. That goes a long way to explaining the awkwardness in the bedroom that takes place.

The wikipedia article on Louis indicates that he tried hard to modernize France but was often thwarted by the nobility. It's interesting to think how a king had his hands tied when trying to enact policy, just like many of our politicians.

The French royals reigned for about 1000 years until the guillotines started to drop. Sophia Coppola did well to highlight this important time in history where Enlightenment ideals gained strength and likewise Christianity waned. Also I believe it goes against popular interpretation to depict the royals in a sympathetic light so that took some bravery.
 

MRAll134

Pelican
I don't think anyone is making the case that Mel is the greatest actor or director that ever lived, just that he obviously loves freedom and made pretty good movies.
Gibson is the best actor that ever lived. Have you even seen The Road Warrior (1982)? Or, what about the Passion of Christ (2004)? Maybe, he is not the Best Director to have ever lived. But, he is the best conservative director of the last 20 years, with John Milius being the best in the last 40.
 

Maddox

Robin
Gibson is the best actor that ever lived. Have you even seen The Road Warrior (1982)? Or, what about the Passion of Christ (2004)? Maybe, he is not the Best Director to have ever lived. But, he is the best conservative director of the last 20 years, with John Milius being the best in the last 40.

I'd maybe agree with the last statement about him being the best conservative director in the last 20 years. Although, I'm not sure exactly what other directors would qualify for that title.

However...best actor ever? I assume you're joking on that one. I'm not even sure how to answer that myself. But for the last 20 years, my vote for that award goes to both Christian Bale and Phillip Seymour Hoffman.
 

stugatz

Pelican
I'd have to disagree. William Wallace screaming freedom just won't die. There were a lot of parodies on it. Without Braveheart you probably don't get The Patriot. There really weren't a lot of sword and shield movies prior to Braveheart and there were a bunch of them in the 90s and early 2000s.

I found Braveheart and The Patriot to be middling and cheesy, albeit entertaining.

While it is debatable on whether or not Braveheart or Patriot have lived on, it's hard to argue against Gladiator, which I don't get. The only thing that move had going for it was Crowe and Joaquin Phoenix's performances. I watched it again in the last year and I still don't get it.
My main issue with The Patriot is that the church-burning sequence was pretty shameless manipulative, & seemed to try to be retroactively portraying the Redcoats as some kind of proto-Nazis. (That, and the whole sequence is very similar to a similar atrocity portrayed in the WWII film Come and See.)

I agree on Gladiator. I like it enough, but I have no clue why it got nominated for Oscars let alone won Best Picture. (EDIT: Looks like it was just a dry year, but I think Traffic or Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon would have been a better choice.)
 
But for the last 20 years, my vote for that award goes to both Christian Bale and Phillip Seymour Hoffman.
Maybe Daniel Day-Lewis who was active in the last twenty years but retired a few years ago. Simply genius acting in Gangs of New York and There Will Be Blood (and The Last of the Mohicans even though that came out more than twenty years ago). I haven't seen Spielberg's Lincoln. Daniel was very selective in his roles, for better or worse, so it's hard to say if he was more talented than a versatile actor such as Christian Bale.
 

DeWoken

Robin
Interesting fact is that Marie Antoinette was booed in Cannes.
From what I remember of the wikis this was a one or two French (((critics))) in the crowd and it got played up. They were protesting the fact that the movie wasn't a second public execution of the uppity shiksa.

Interesting trivia:

Her BFF :sad:
There is a scene towards the end of the movie shows many princes and princesses of the blood saying farewell to the Queen before fleeing the country, including her two favorite companions, the Duchesse de Polignac and the Princesse de Lamballe. The real Duchesse de Polignac did take refuge in Switzerland. Princesse de Lamballe did initially leave the royal family for safety in England, but returned later at the request of Marie Antoinette after she and her family were caught trying to escape. She remained with the royal family until her own arrest. After refusing to sign an oath renouncing the monarchy, she was mutilated and beheaded, and her head was mounted on a pike and paraded past the prison window of the doomed Queen.

@MRAll134, do you predict we will see another excellent movie out of "St. Mel"? Divorce takes a lot out of a man. Whoa! He has 9 kids :eek:

 
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My main issue with The Patriot is that the church-burning sequence was pretty shameless manipulative, & seemed to try to be retroactively portraying the Redcoats as some kind of proto-Nazis. (That, and the whole sequence is very similar to a similar atrocity portrayed in the WWII film Come and See.)

I agree on Gladiator. I like it enough, but I have no clue why it got nominated for Oscars let alone won Best Picture. (EDIT: Looks like it was just a dry year, but I think Traffic or Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon would have been a better choice.)

I consider Gladiator to be one of my all-time favorite movies. It has such a timeless story of a noble and just leader of men, who has his life ripped apart by an ultimately weak and hugely insecure excuse for a man. The villain in the end gets what he deserves in a powerful tale of righteous revenge. I have a hard time deciding of the two films, Braveheart and Gladiator, which I prefer most...

"My name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies of the North, General of the Felix Legions and loyal servant to the TRUE emperor, Marcus Aurelius. Father to a murdered son, husband to a murdered wife. And I will have my vengeance, in this life or the next."


In death, he reunites with his slain family...


Iconic quotes from the classic film...

 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
Mel Gibson is one of the greatest ever. Everytime he directs its a midnight release for me. It's no wonder he was at one point the biggest man in Hollywood. The only 2 movies I'm interested in that have yet to come out are his Passion of the Christ sequel and the Sopranos prequel.

It is a little curious how he seems to have earned his way back into hollyweirds good graces. I remember when Hacksaw Ridge came out, they had almost a song and dance of Andrew Garfield saying "see? Mel's not that bad. He's not a drunken anti-semite anymore." Nevertheless, I'm not too worried. He proved he can do a movie all on his own with Passion and he proved he hasn't compromised with Hacksaw.
 
I have heard it said that Mel hasn't produced any good movies since his drunk fiasco.

Where the heck are the Chinese and Russian movies already? Anti-ZOG places are not skillful at winning hearts and minds :confused: Edit: and I mean, why can't blacklisted talent collaborate with them?

Watch the movie first, I would. Would not advise looking up the back story or analyses beforehand as its simple, spare message will have been already explained and therefore its impact lost. It has a meta-commentary about the way the world is going that is consistent with recent events. But it is a good film with great acting and directing in and of itself.


This guys Magnum Opus was Leviathan which the usual suspects loved as they took it for a commentary on "Putin's Russia". Most Russians thought the film was rubbish. The above film is about fathers and sons and the aspect of the "Dark Father" each kids Dad possesses Odin-like in his children's imaginations.


^Feels like a parable akin to the morally ambivalent Canterbury Tales.

I wouldn't expect too much 'based' collaborative work with Hollywoods blacklisted from either country though.

The interface of their movie industries with the outside world is controlled by the Cohens.

Just as China's rise has been stage managed by the Chosenites who have controlled their interface with the outside world since the 70s and before and just as Putins Russian administration has to play along with the Cohens to even survive.

They're not going to upset their masters/enablers/partners too much any time soon.
 
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