The Movie Thread

Wolfgang01

Chicken
Atheist
Yeah,
Trinity now has the Matrix-warping abilities as Neo. She can fly when he forgot how to. She laments having to be a mother and hits the antagonist for calling her a "bitch" (in one of the most predictable, eye-rolling scenes in the movie).
That, and the movie's way too goofy in regards to the more somber style of the previous films (it almost creeps into MCU level style of comedy). There's way too many new characters and truly lacks the commanding presence of
Morpheus and Agent Smith.
The action is stale and predictable (can't top the two two with that) and
they're setting up sequels which is ironic. While Neo was still trapped in the Matrix, characters were pointing out how tiring and stupid all the endless sequels and remakes in Hollywood all are.
 
Last edited:

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I've been watching "Meet Joe Black" today with Brad Pitt and Anthony Hopkins.

Anthony Hopkins character repeatedly kisses his daughters on the lips. Then one of the daughters kissed her brother in law on the lips.

I have seen this in many movies. Was it a way to distort morality by the cabal?
 

Hypno

Crow
Saw Chinatown, which is regarded as one of the best Noir films ever. It was good, I would recommend, although I was disappointed by the ending, although the ending of any suspense film is always something that even the best film can get tripped up on. One of the best was Body Heat, and while that's also one of the best neo noir films it barely missed an X-rating so its not for this crowd.

I previously recommended another Roman Polanski film above, The Ghost Writer. It garnered very little buzz but I think it compares favorably even with Chinatown.
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
Saw Chinatown, which is regarded as one of the best Noir films ever. It was good, I would recommend, although I was disappointed by the ending, although the ending of any suspense film is always something that even the best film can get tripped up on. One of the best was Body Heat, and while that's also one of the best neo noir films it barely missed an X-rating so its not for this crowd.

I previously recommended another Roman Polanski film above, The Ghost Writer. It garnered very little buzz but I think it compares favorably even with Chinatown.

Yeah, Body Heat had a great ending. It nicely wraps up the movie, but at the same time, leaves you wondering how happy one of the main characters is at the end. An excellent contemporary film noir.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Tonight I watched The Last Duel directed by Ridley Scott and thoroughly enjoyed it, which is rare for me these days with most films out of Hollywood.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Tonight I watched The Last Duel directed by Ridley Scott and thoroughly enjoyed it, which is rare for me these days with most films out of Hollywood.
I wonder if anyone who watched The Last Duel cares to comment on the Christian review of this movie as per the below:


20211225_163707.jpg
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I wonder if anyone who watched The Last Duel cares to comment on the Christian review of this movie as per the below:
There is fornicating, but not much nudity. When I anticipated any of either, I took of the headphones and looked away. For me it has nothing to do with being prudish, I just don't want to have sexual scenes playing in my head. The violence, which wasn't overly gratuitous in this movie, certainly by Hollywood standards anyway, doesn't disturb me. I've read much worse in books on WW1 & WW2. There was a little swearing, in one scene if I recall correctly, but it is set in the middle ages, so not much at all. It has an adult theme, but I'm an adult. I rarely watch movies, so it's not a big deal for me, as long as the story is compelling I'll watch. With these things you just have to be your own censor.
 
Last edited:

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
Weird...people keep recommending the last duel here. I thought it was a woke me too fest?

I just got done watching this:


Breaking Away (1979)

The story is about a group of outcast kids in a small town. They refer to themselves as 'Cutters' and they are working class rivals of another gang at the University. One kid has some curiosity and enough zest to relentlessly train as a cyclist as well as be genuinely curious about Italian culture.

I won't spoil too much but it all culminates in a huge cycling race at the end. But the actual message of the movie is you need to cultivate some passion in life otherwise you will get stuck in a small town with closed minded ways of thinking. I really liked how the MC was able to use his interest in other cultures to change his life. As someone who moved abroad, it resonated with me.

I know on this forum there has been a shift in attitudes towards travel and living abroad and a suggestion this is part of a globalist plan to alienate us etc...though there is personal transformation that can come from taking influence from other cultures.

The MC has a father who talks about when he was a boy, he worked 10 hours. He pushes his son to take a job and join the workaholic system he knows so well. He isn't really proud of his work. It's just working yourself into the ground is the way things are and his son better well get on board as well. The son tentatively tries mostly from pressure. But at the end of the movie, we have some hope that he will find an alternative way of living for himself. One that isn't just avoidant escapism with his loser friends nor one that is a slavish empty job like his father.

Ultimately, a cheesy coming of age story but it highlights the importance of self-actualizing yourself through your interests and drives (not what your parents want or what your friends are doing). The message, which has been repeated a lot in various movies and stories, is a vital one.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Weird...people keep recommending the last duel here. I thought it was a woke me too fest?

I just got done watching this:


Breaking Away (1979)

The story is about a group of outcast kids in a small town. They refer to themselves as 'Cutters' and they are working class rivals of another gang at the University. One kid has some curiosity and enough zest to relentlessly train as a cyclist as well as be genuinely curious about Italian culture.

I won't spoil too much but it all culminates in a huge cycling race at the end. But the actual message of the movie is you need to cultivate some passion in life otherwise you will get stuck in a small town with closed minded ways of thinking. I really liked how the MC was able to use his interest in other cultures to change his life. As someone who moved abroad, it resonated with me.

I know on this forum there has been a shift in attitudes towards travel and living abroad and a suggestion this is part of a globalist plan to alienate us etc...though there is personal transformation that can come from taking influence from other cultures.

The MC has a father who talks about when he was a boy, he worked 10 hours. He pushes his son to take a job and join the workaholic system he knows so well. He isn't really proud of his work. It's just working yourself into the ground is the way things are and his son better well get on board as well. The son tentatively tries mostly from pressure. But at the end of the movie, we have some hope that he will find an alternative way of living for himself. One that isn't just avoidant escapism with his loser friends nor one that is a slavish empty job like his father.

Ultimately, a cheesy coming of age story but it highlights the importance of self-actualizing yourself through your interests and drives (not what your parents want or what your friends are doing). The message, which has been repeated a lot in various movies and stories, is a vital one.
"Breaking Away" was quite funny, entertaining and light. I Iove finding movies like that most people never heard of.
 

Turretin

Sparrow
Protestant
Saw Chinatown, which is regarded as one of the best Noir films ever. It was good, I would recommend, although I was disappointed by the ending, although the ending of any suspense film is always something that even the best film can get tripped up on. One of the best was Body Heat, and while that's also one of the best neo noir films it barely missed an X-rating so its not for this crowd.

I previously recommended another Roman Polanski film above, The Ghost Writer. It garnered very little buzz but I think it compares favorably even with Chinatown.
The highlight of Chinatown is John Huston. The movie is great, but they had to make a second part, that like many sequels hurts the legacy of the first part. Do you know that movie with Bogart that is filmed in ego-perspective the first 30 minutes or so? The Film Noirs of the 30s and 40s have a happy end. Chinatown is just depressing.
 

Gimlet

Kingfisher
Im a big Western fan and was very happy when a new Western movie called "Old Henry" popped up a couple of weeks ago. It was for me the best movie this year, which doesnt say anything in this times but for the whole 90min I was bound to my couch and enjoyed it a lot.

No gays. No Betas. No Females. Movie starts slow as most Western do, but achieves to create interesting good characters, that I wanted to follow their story. I put the trailer here, but I would recommend to dont watch it. Go in blind and you wont regret it I promise!



My wife shares a Netflix accoutn with a friend (yeah I know...) and I admit to watch The Office lately a lot (I enjoy it) with my Wife together. Just saw a new movie pop up in the front page called: The Power of the Dog what it seems to be a Western movie with Benedict Cumberbatch. Thought why not give a try and after 30min into it, something just didnt feel right. So I stopped the movie and opened imdb to read a couple of reviews and found this one:

: View attachment 35386

Ohh....now I know why I had a bitter taste when I saw a Western movie on the frontpage of Jewflix. I shouldnt expect anything less. I was lucky that I didnt see the Gay part yet. Really need to cancel Netflix.....
Wow. I started to watch this movie Power of the Dog, and I shut it off after the kid made paper flowers. I knew it stunk, that's for this post proving we should all trust our instincts of this
 

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
The highlight of Chinatown is John Huston. The movie is great, but they had to make a second part, that like many sequels hurts the legacy of the first part. Do you know that movie with Bogart that is filmed in ego-perspective the first 30 minutes or so? The Film Noirs of the 30s and 40s have a happy end. Chinatown is just depressing.

Most of Hollywood movies portray quite bleak, joyless reality.

Also, I cant think of one futuristic/sci-fi movie that shows a nice, pleasant version of the future. Its always either zombies or some post apocalyptic event or something else equally depressing.

I guess they do it so people would feel hopeless about the future and demoralized. This accomplishes a few goals, discouraging people from having kids being probably one of the main ones.
 

Turretin

Sparrow
Protestant
Most of Hollywood movies portray quite bleak, joyless reality.

Also, I cant think of one futuristic/sci-fi movie that shows a nice, pleasant version of the future. Its always either zombies or some post apocalyptic event or something else equally depressing.

I guess they do it so people would feel hopeless about the future and demoralized. This accomplishes a few goals, discouraging people from having kids being probably one of the main ones.
Compare that to the Maltese Falcon. That is an optimistic movie. There are bad people, but the good, rough guy, with no serious psychological drama, but rooted in his identity beats them. Die Hard is another example. There are exceptions in Hollywood, not every movie is subversion.
 
Top