The Movie Thread

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Good rating system, could have saved me the 10 minutes I wasted. What site is this?

I find it very useful in that it helps me to see a quick summary of a movie written through Christian lenses. Thus, I wouldnt waste my time on a woke/degenerate/nasty film.
 

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
Thirty plus years ago I too enjoyed Breaking Away. At the time it was somewhat well known and mostly appreciated however I believe the media was blind to it at least I don't recall any promotion for the movie on the boob tube.
The feeling I had watching it was, 'why isn't this talked about more?' It's ultimately inspirational like any Rocky type movie. I think it has a negative/depressing undercurrent to it which might be a bit too 'real' for some audiences maybe.

Interesting that it came out in 1979 (a few years after Rocky) and is another example of a happy ending in a decade that had almost entirely bummer endings.
 

Hypno

Crow
Weird...people keep recommending the last duel here. I thought it was a woke me too fest?

I just got done watching this:


Breaking Away (1979)

The story is about a group of outcast kids in a small town. They refer to themselves as 'Cutters' and they are working class rivals of another gang at the University. One kid has some curiosity and enough zest to relentlessly train as a cyclist as well as be genuinely curious about Italian culture.

I won't spoil too much but it all culminates in a huge cycling race at the end. But the actual message of the movie is you need to cultivate some passion in life otherwise you will get stuck in a small town with closed minded ways of thinking. I really liked how the MC was able to use his interest in other cultures to change his life. As someone who moved abroad, it resonated with me.

I know on this forum there has been a shift in attitudes towards travel and living abroad and a suggestion this is part of a globalist plan to alienate us etc...though there is personal transformation that can come from taking influence from other cultures.

The MC has a father who talks about when he was a boy, he worked 10 hours. He pushes his son to take a job and join the workaholic system he knows so well. He isn't really proud of his work. It's just working yourself into the ground is the way things are and his son better well get on board as well. The son tentatively tries mostly from pressure. But at the end of the movie, we have some hope that he will find an alternative way of living for himself. One that isn't just avoidant escapism with his loser friends nor one that is a slavish empty job like his father.

Ultimately, a cheesy coming of age story but it highlights the importance of self-actualizing yourself through your interests and drives (not what your parents want or what your friends are doing). The message, which has been repeated a lot in various movies and stories, is a vital one.

Forgot about this film but I remember I liked it. Good summary. Its more of a coming of age film in terms of finding your niche in the world as a teen or early 20s man, not the typical puberty type coming of age stories.
 

Hypno

Crow
Compare that to the Maltese Falcon. That is an optimistic movie. There are bad people, but the good, rough guy, with no serious psychological drama, but rooted in his identity beats them. Die Hard is another example. There are exceptions in Hollywood, not every movie is subversion.

Yes, ChinaTown has a depressing ending. They telegraph that from the title, which is code for a type of "You can't beat City Hall" nihlism, and the film is about political corruption. It would have been more disappointing if they had somehow forced a happy ending, because we all know that would be highly contrived.

My take on it is while it was a well made film with some stunning performances, the story sort of falls apart at the end. The ending was not worthy of the performances and the hype. I don't mind that the ending wasn't uplifting. But I do mind that the ending (in my view) seemed to erode some of the characters motivations, not to the point of plot holes but in that direction. Its a little surprising, since the film is heralded as one of the best noir films of all time.

Side note - the film was directed by Roman Polanski. He appears in the film in a small role at the small thug with the knife who slices Nicholson's nose.

And I agree that Houston gave a great performance. Understated, almost Gus-Fring like, but different.
 

Hypno

Crow
Saw a Guy Ritchie film yesterday, The Gentlemen.

Very satisfying. Typical Guy Ritchie movie - small time thugs, unexpected plot twists, etc. Great performances by Colin Ferrel and Hugh Grant. Less humor than Snatch but still almost as good. (But that's his best in my opinion, so don't expect it to be that level.)
 

RedLagoon

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
Saw a Guy Ritchie film yesterday, The Gentlemen.

Very satisfying. Typical Guy Ritchie movie - small time thugs, unexpected plot twists, etc. Great performances by Colin Ferrel and Hugh Grant. Less humor than Snatch but still almost as good. (But that's his best in my opinion, so don't expect it to be that level.)
Yes it was good.

But Colin Farrell seems to pick the right movies:

-In Bruges

And a personal favorite of mine:

-Cassandras dream
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
Weird...people keep recommending the last duel here. I thought it was a woke me too fest?

I just got done watching this:


Breaking Away (1979)

The story is about a group of outcast kids in a small town. They refer to themselves as 'Cutters' and they are working class rivals of another gang at the University. One kid has some curiosity and enough zest to relentlessly train as a cyclist as well as be genuinely curious about Italian culture.

I won't spoil too much but it all culminates in a huge cycling race at the end. But the actual message of the movie is you need to cultivate some passion in life otherwise you will get stuck in a small town with closed minded ways of thinking. I really liked how the MC was able to use his interest in other cultures to change his life. As someone who moved abroad, it resonated with me.

I know on this forum there has been a shift in attitudes towards travel and living abroad and a suggestion this is part of a globalist plan to alienate us etc...though there is personal transformation that can come from taking influence from other cultures.

The MC has a father who talks about when he was a boy, he worked 10 hours. He pushes his son to take a job and join the workaholic system he knows so well. He isn't really proud of his work. It's just working yourself into the ground is the way things are and his son better well get on board as well. The son tentatively tries mostly from pressure. But at the end of the movie, we have some hope that he will find an alternative way of living for himself. One that isn't just avoidant escapism with his loser friends nor one that is a slavish empty job like his father.

Ultimately, a cheesy coming of age story but it highlights the importance of self-actualizing yourself through your interests and drives (not what your parents want or what your friends are doing). The message, which has been repeated a lot in various movies and stories, is a vital one.

I didn't think the movie was cheesy at all. IMO, it's one of the best coming-of-age films ever made.

One of the other themes the movie presents was the drawbacks of idolizing others. The protag, who worships the Italian cycling team, gets a heavy dose of realism when they finally come to his town. It's kind of a nice Christian message thrown in there, even though to my recollection religion doesn't play a part in the film.
 

Turretin

Sparrow
Protestant
Maybe I am lonely in the opinion that every Guy Ritchie movie, including Snatch, is ridiculous. The casts are great, but the stories are silly constructed and the cuts and the camera are too wannabe cool. The Gentlemen serve as a perfect example. The dialogues are shamefully wannabe early Tarantino.
 

GreatIrishElk

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
If anybody has not seen Netflix’s new movie ‘don’t look up’, go and watch it. Quick synopsis, the world is going to end but nobody wants to listen. It is hard to watch because it is exactly the same position we are in right now.
 

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
Been watching the Beatles doc on Disney plus. Just seen the first part:


I had seen the original Let it Be a long time ago plus several key moments from this on YouTube before. Watching this now, it's amazing to me how it humanizes The Beatles. These guys were almost a mythological force at this time. But they're just 4 guys here. The documentary shows the frustration of the creative process - not every idea they have is golden. A lot of the jamming around is just goofing off. Genius does not just come out of nowhere. But we see moments here of how flashes of inspiration become songs, especially from Paul.

Paul was known for his dictatorial role in the band at this phase and it shows. In particular, George appears to be his whipping boy. George is reprimanded several times for adding too many guitar flourishes and for having ideas that are too old fashioned or simple or just too something but anyway, Paul doesn't like them. George does his best to prove himself by bringing in what would later turn out to be classics (such as All things must pass) but he still can't get the recognition he deserves. Anyone who has ever been in a work situation where their flaws are put under the spotlight and their strengths ignored will relate to George Harrison's plight in part 1 of this movie.

As for John Lennon, he comes across quite passive here. Not really bringing many ideas. Avoiding conflict with humour but regularly being late and ignoring the fact that having Yoko just sit there might annoy other people. None of the frustration towards John ever bubbles up as it does with Paul and George, probably because nobody would truly feel comfortable directly questioning Lennon (due to his temperamental nature plus prior status as band leader). I find these dynamics really quite fascinating and I am looking forward to seeing more in part 2!

Now I'm not trying to concern troll here, but i know on this forum The Beatles will probably get lumped in as another conspiracy. They were engineered and then injected into society - they were the vax of the 60's to unleash satanic free love on the world! I'm sure there were elites who found ways to use The Beatles to meet their ends

BUT

they were astonishing songwriters who really worked at their craft. They had talent at a young age, sure, but they put in thousands of hours of practice performing in Hamburg (not the 10k famously quoted by Gladwell but still a good 2-3 thousand hours). On top of that, they were willing to embrace their curiosity to travel the world and take on new influences (as well as drugs of course). Through The Beatles, we can see how passion, hard work, curiosity and brotherhood could lead to an amazing musical force unlike any other group in history. The Beatles were great not because of one individual but a meeting of 4 conflicting yet complimentary musicians and characters. Paul's workhorse-ism a ying to Lennon's passionate (yet destructive) forceful songwriting. Ringo's dopey humour an antidote to George's glum mysticism. It all came together by chance and like an accidental completion of a Rubiks cube, it's amazing it happened at all.
 

JayR

Kingfisher
Atheist
Weird...people keep recommending the last duel here. I thought it was a woke me too fest?
I almost avoided watching this movie because I kept reading sentiments like "a feminist rebuke of misogyny!!" in the reviews.

It's not that at all.

The movie is set in 14th century France, and at that time men dominated and women were subservient. That's just how it was, but it drives modern feminazis crazy to see that truth -- even if it happened 700 years ago -- portrayed on the screen.

It's a good period piece done in the excellent Ridley Scott style. I enjoyed it and recommend it.
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Escape from New York - Been a good decade since I watched it. Pure class. Batman is pretty good, but Snake is a real super hero. Awesome music, too.
 

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
If anybody has not seen Netflix’s new movie ‘don’t look up’, go and watch it. Quick synopsis, the world is going to end but nobody wants to listen. It is hard to watch because it is exactly the same position we are in right now.

I just saw it.

I feel like with Di Caprio's involvement (a known climate change obsessive) the target of this movie is probably climate change denialists. It also points it's fingers at the Trump administration and Republicans. It's pretty obvious Streep (who gets involved in sex scandals) and her son Jonah Hill (who is presented as a moron) are supposed to be surrogates for Trump and Co.

Also, the scientists trying to show people the truth are attacked online by right wing trolls (at one point they are referred to as Marxists). What I imagined the targets of humour were as follows:
- people who ignore experts
- Trump supporters
- Trump administration
- tech billionaire entrepreneurs
- social media

It all gets a bit complicated if we are to look at it through a lens of the covid response though, as the movie also presents the government as ignoring scientists if they can selfishly use a crisis for their own gain. It also presents the governments as willing to lie to the people in collusion with goals of big tech and depicts scientists being black listed or 'taken off grid' as they call it in this movie. This is exactly what has happened with the covid response, where the government ignored the 'wrong' scientists and also took advantage of the pandemic to suit the wants of various other interests.

This aspect of the critique is a bit more subtle and probably unintended. Yet it's actually the more interesting aspect of the film. It's clear that the main targets are the obvious right wing ones and leftists are supposed to watch it and feel like the good guys. However, one can't help but also notice that it shows how individuals with common sense are smeared and ignored by an increasingly idiotic and reactionary populace (people who are also abused and manipulated by big tech.) As a result, I feel it's an accidental critique of the left and current coronavirus response, though the intended target is the complete opposite.

I feel that most people who watch this movie will come away thinking 'those who don't listen to scientists are idiots' though. I certainly don't think it will work to wake normies up to the evil of the current agenda.
 

fortyfive

Woodpecker
Other Christian
Recently I watched this movie, and it was a pleasure. No hidden agenda, no leftist hero pretending to be tough, by using the F word constantly, but good acting, smart dialogues, highly recommend.

 

NoMoreTO

Hummingbird
Catholic
If anybody has not seen Netflix’s new movie ‘don’t look up’, go and watch it. Quick synopsis, the world is going to end but nobody wants to listen. It is hard to watch because it is exactly the same position we are in right now.

I watched about half of that movie. I sort of found it to be kind of a downer. It was designed as a comedy or satire, but nothing really made me laugh out loud.
 

MartyMcFly

Kingfisher
Other Christian
Escape from New York - Been a good decade since I watched it. Pure class. Batman is pretty good, but Snake is a real super hero. Awesome music, too.
I really liked "Escape from New York" as well. Snake was one of the coolest characters in movie history and definitely someone you would want to lead you out of a jam. I am a big fan of dystopian movies and this one is one of the best. The pimpmobile the crime boss on the island drove is also memorable and the creepy mentally deranged people who lived in the sewers were especially creepy. John Carpenter's "Assault on Precinct 13" is also great if you liked "Escape from new York."

Here is the pimpmobile for those who didn't see the movie:

download.jpg
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Been watching the Beatles doc on Disney plus. Just seen the first part:


I had seen the original Let it Be a long time ago plus several key moments from this on YouTube before. Watching this now, it's amazing to me how it humanizes The Beatles. These guys were almost a mythological force at this time. But they're just 4 guys here. The documentary shows the frustration of the creative process - not every idea they have is golden. A lot of the jamming around is just goofing off. Genius does not just come out of nowhere. But we see moments here of how flashes of inspiration become songs, especially from Paul.

Paul was known for his dictatorial role in the band at this phase and it shows. In particular, George appears to be his whipping boy. George is reprimanded several times for adding too many guitar flourishes and for having ideas that are too old fashioned or simple or just too something but anyway, Paul doesn't like them. George does his best to prove himself by bringing in what would later turn out to be classics (such as All things must pass) but he still can't get the recognition he deserves. Anyone who has ever been in a work situation where their flaws are put under the spotlight and their strengths ignored will relate to George Harrison's plight in part 1 of this movie.

As for John Lennon, he comes across quite passive here. Not really bringing many ideas. Avoiding conflict with humour but regularly being late and ignoring the fact that having Yoko just sit there might annoy other people. None of the frustration towards John ever bubbles up as it does with Paul and George, probably because nobody would truly feel comfortable directly questioning Lennon (due to his temperamental nature plus prior status as band leader). I find these dynamics really quite fascinating and I am looking forward to seeing more in part 2!

Now I'm not trying to concern troll here, but i know on this forum The Beatles will probably get lumped in as another conspiracy. They were engineered and then injected into society - they were the vax of the 60's to unleash satanic free love on the world! I'm sure there were elites who found ways to use The Beatles to meet their ends

BUT

they were astonishing songwriters who really worked at their craft. They had talent at a young age, sure, but they put in thousands of hours of practice performing in Hamburg (not the 10k famously quoted by Gladwell but still a good 2-3 thousand hours). On top of that, they were willing to embrace their curiosity to travel the world and take on new influences (as well as drugs of course). Through The Beatles, we can see how passion, hard work, curiosity and brotherhood could lead to an amazing musical force unlike any other group in history. The Beatles were great not because of one individual but a meeting of 4 conflicting yet complimentary musicians and characters. Paul's workhorse-ism a ying to Lennon's passionate (yet destructive) forceful songwriting. Ringo's dopey humour an antidote to George's glum mysticism. It all came together by chance and like an accidental completion of a Rubiks cube, it's amazing it happened at all.
I watched all 3 and although it was interesting to watch how they interacted together, the only musical contributions of note were from Paul and George, but mostly Paul. The Beatles latter work, as shown in the documentary, wasn't on par with the standard of their early pop songs, which were so well crafted and full of hooks. By 1967 they were using a lot of drugs and had clearly grown apart to some degree, which shows in their songs and not in a positive way. To me they look like a married couple treading on egg shells.

Towards the end they show their globohomo colours with a rant about Enoch Powell and as far as I know Paul & Ringo are just as Woke today. The Beatles were a brilliant, gifted bunch of lads who wrote great popular music, but in the end they were a force for, and a driver of, degeneracy. Along with the Rolling Stones, they were (((elevated))) to a cultural level that has had disastrous consequences for the West since. Popularising drug use, casual sex, Eastern mysticism and promoting idiotic, kumbayaesque, progressive ideology cannot be viewed as anything other than disastrous. And no, I don't think they were "handled". Evil follows where the money flows and in the 60s it was flowing into entertainment.
 

GreatIrishElk

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I just saw it.

I watched about half of that movie
Yes apologies, I did not mean to sell it as an enjoyable or well made movie. Any Netflix original ever made must be viewed (if at all) with a critical eye. I realised that this one in particular was mainly aimed at the conservative/ republican perspective.

One thing that particularly stood out was how they shone a light on how a few people control what ‘science’ and ‘news’ stories the masses are able to consume. Ask most normies if it is possible that this could reflect the unnecessarily damaging response to the coronavirus, and they will protest passionately that it is only satire.
 
Top