The Movie Thread

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
I watched all 3 and although it was interesting to watch how they interacted together, the only musical contributions of note were from Paul and George, but mostly Paul. The Beatles latter work, as shown in the documentary, wasn't on par with the standard of their early pop songs, which were so well crafted and full of hooks. By 1967 they were using a lot of drugs and had clearly grown apart to some degree, which shows in their songs and not in a positive way. To me they look like a married couple treading on egg shells.

Towards the end they show their globohomo colours with a rant about Enoch Powell and as far as I know Paul & Ringo are just as Woke today. The Beatles were a brilliant, gifted bunch of lads who wrote great popular music, but in the end they were a force for, and a driver of, degeneracy. Along with the Rolling Stones, they were (((elevated))) to a cultural level that has had disastrous consequences for the West since. Popularising drug use, casual sex, Eastern mysticism and promoting idiotic, kumbayaesque, progressive ideology cannot be viewed as anything other than disastrous. And no, I don't think they were "handled". Evil follows where the money flows and in the 60s it was flowing into entertainment.

I've now finished all 3 myself. I want to write another post about the later two episodes...I would agree with everything you said there though. Except I think John's 'Don't let me down' was a great song from this period. I have no idea why this was left off the album. Paul was clearly on a different level during this period and was able to churn out what would become all time classic ballads (Let it be, Long and Riding road) with seeming ease. I don't love 'Let It Be' personally though.

I did observe that the wives tended to be artsy 'independent' women in the case of Paul/John. I remember at one point Paul's wife says 'you have to go to war - that's the only bad thing about being a man' in reference to the Vietnam war.

I don't really know how woke they were. A lot of the political references are done with goofing around/jokey tones. They absorbed what was going on at the time but I don't think they cared all that deeply and when they did, they moved on quickly. Being Beatles (not ideology) was the thing that bound them and the disbanding had disastrous consequences for all of them.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Catholic
Gold Member
To me there was only one Matrix. I started the second one years ago and turned it off after 10 minutes.

Only good sequel I've seen is Terminator 2.

Hello Godfather Part 2.

I saw Don't Look Up because it was on netflix and DiCaprio is in it. If it was in theaters probably wouldn't have made the drive. Man, what a piece of junk. Nearly every aspect of this movie was bad. The only thing decent was the acting, but the characters were so one note and boring. They never even got into the science of the comet hurdling toward Earth. The editing was terrible, so choppy. Endless social media montages. A pop star sings a song that is meant to be funny, but is just dumb.

The whole movie just comes across as smug and heavy handed. Probably one of the worst movies to come out this year.

Play Dirty:

I've talked about this movie before, but it's worth mentioning again. Great WW2 North African Desert flick. Michael Caine and some mercenary are tasked with blowing up an oil depot. Great pacing and cinematography. There are some cool gun fights, but they build suspense before it happens.
 

Tippy

Woodpecker
Other Christian
So I just got back from Spiderman: No Way Home.

I was already a big fan of both the other movies in this series. I think they worked well as good movies in other genres with Superhero elements (the highschool coming of age movie in the first one, the Eurotrip travel flick in the second).

This third one really upped the game though. It starts right where the last one left off. Spiderman goes to Dr. Strange to try to undo the reveal of his identity in part 2, which basically leads to a multiverse opening up with evil villains from past films appearing. Spiderman at first tries to trap them but (inspired by his aunt) tries to remove their wicked ways instead.

Of course, this isn't as simple as all that as people consumed with evil forces find themselves attached to the 'dark side' and view it as a vital part of who they are. Quite a powerful theme really, and who cannot relate to that feeling that their satan influenced side is somehow something they need? One thing I found interesting was how this movie was not about destroying the enemy buy about learning to understand that villains have good in them and can be redeemed through compassion. You could argue this is all very sappy but I feel like Spiderman is forced to confront his vengeful rage and overcome it in a hard earned personal victory. Due to the fact it is a superhero movie, the good does effectively have to be physically beaten into people in a way not too dissimilar to killing them. Yet the message of loving even ones enemies and trying to hope they can be redeemed is a positive one from a Christian perspective.

I don't want to spoilt too much but basically, what Spiderman also learns from the other Spiderman universe(s) is a kind of fatalistic reality: he will have to face suffering and loss and that it is unavoidable. Yet loss is a vital part of his maturity - he absorbs the lessons learnt from this and that then becomes part of who he is. The idea that pain and loss are needed for growth and maturity could hopefully be a slap in the face for the soy boy fanbase of these movies.

There is another type of sacrifice that Spiderman must make in this movie that nearly brought a tear to my eye. There is nothing more powerful to me in movies that when a character has to let go of something they hold dear to them for the greater good (See Casablanca, Toy Story 3, Manhattan and even Avengers: Infinity War). Sacrifice is an important Christ derived ideal and while in this movie I had a few issues as to the real world consequences of this and how it would actually work (giving me more of a headache than the intended gut punch to the heart) it was still far more moving than any other entry in this series.

There were several characters from past incarnations of these movies I didn't expect to see again and there was humour from these interactions as well as a good deal of nostalgia (in particular when friends and foes from the first trilogy pop up).

You could argue that the past two movies in this trilogy were escapist low stakes affairs but I feel like what made this one stand out is it had real world consequences for Spiderman in a number of universes.
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
Play Dirty:

I've talked about this movie before, but it's worth mentioning again. Great WW2 North African Desert flick. Michael Caine and some mercenary are tasked with blowing up an oil depot. Great pacing and cinematography. There are some cool gun fights, but they build suspense before it happens.

I will search this one out. Love WWII films and I'm a big fan of Caine as he's an amazingly talented actor. He can take a silly little movie like "Blame It On Rio" and make it better than it actually is.

BTW...if you've never seen him in "A Shock To The System" I'd recommend watching this if you like black comedies. His acting in this one is top-notch.
 

Papist

Woodpecker
Trad Catholic
I have just watched Premonition, which was panned by the 'Critics' on Rotten Tomatoes, and it's easy to see why! The protagonist is seemingly a stay-at-home mum with two daughters - a traditional American family. During the film she seeks guidance from a Priest. The plot was decent and I would score it 7/10.
 

renotime

Ostrich
Catholic
Gold Member
I don't think a movie gets 8 percent on Rotten Tomatoes because it has traditional values and religion. And it came out in 2007 before people hated whites, religion, and housewives.
 

Denam8487

Sparrow
Catholic
“Best of the Best” starring Phillip Rhee, Eric Roberts, Chris Penn, and James Earl Jones.

A martial arts movie made for men. The MC Eric Roberts is a widower and doting white father to his only son which is next to unheard of in Hollywood.

He befriends Tommy Lee who is the team’s best fighter. I like how Tommy and Eric Roberts form a natural and organic male friendship. I hate that we don’t see this anymore without a bunch of Tumblr and Reddit degenerates “shipping” two guys who had a conversation with one another.

Chris Penn is the resident redneck badass and while the film makes a few jokes at his expense, he’s still portrayed as an unequivocal good guy against the Koreans. It doesn’t hurt that Penn steals damn near every scene that he’s in.

There’s a vegan Buddhist white guy on the team that gets steamrolled in the finals which made me LOL. Also Eric Roberts doesn’t end up simping for the token Blonde coach.

Throw in a powerful 80s rock soundtrack, some excellent TKD choreography and a satisfying ending and you have arguably the best martial arts film ever made.

No nudity or excessive swearing either.

 

Going strong

Crow
Trad Catholic
Gold Member
Hello Godfather Part 2.

I saw Don't Look Up because it was on netflix and DiCaprio is in it. If it was in theaters probably wouldn't have made the drive. Man, what a piece of junk. Nearly every aspect of this movie was bad. The only thing decent was the acting, but the characters were so one note and boring. They never even got into the science of the comet hurdling toward Earth. The editing was terrible, so choppy. Endless social media montages. A pop star sings a song that is meant to be funny, but is just dumb.

The whole movie just comes across as smug and heavy handed. Probably one of the worst movies to come out this year.

What you said is right but it sometimes feels like, hidden among the general, usual woke trash of this movie ("heterosexual Texan men are trigger happy and Orange Bad") , there are some not-so-leftist funny bits.

Like, the bad President having a pic of herself with Steven Seagal, but also with Clinton... Or, the rich woke 2000 survivors, having spent billions on a spaceship, bringing their beloved gay cellphones, but forgetting to bring guns, thus ultimately safely landing on a distant planet, but getting eaten by brontorecs. I mean, it's funny, they beat time and space across the stars, but forgot to buy a rifle.

It's mostly pro-vax trash, yes, but it has some funny parts, reminiscent of the Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy.
 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I agree with the movieguide.org review and thought it was one of the most boring films I've ever seen. It's got a Rashomon plot where some parts of the story are shown from different characters' points of view. I can't recall the exact details, but one of the sequences of one character was almost 100% identical to the previous character's viewpoint, the only tiny difference was an insignificant scarf and that was it, and both lasted several minutes. Really boring.

There was a lot of violence during the final duel and following when the loser's body was despoiled. Pretty nasty Game of Thrones level stuff.

The film also anachronistically shoe-horned into its plot how terrible men are to women and that gender equality would solve all these problems. I can't recall how they phrased it, but it was like 90's woke terminology delivered in a lame French accent.

They also worked in a plot device to illustrate this, which I'll hide to avoid spoilers.

Adam Driver's character raped the wife of Matt Damon's character and in order to show how terrible men are to women, in a totally unbelievable scene where his wife tells him she was raped, Damon's character actually says something like,

"Well, I'll not let him be the last man who entered you. Preparest thou thine womb that I mayest enter it."

"But dearest lord, my womb dost achest so."

"Silence, thou wench! Disrobest thineself forthwith and prepare to be mounted!"

It was almost this bad.
 
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Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Saw Matrix Resurrections yesterday evening. I was expecting 100% unwatchable trash, so the bar was pretty low, and even though it was well over two hours long, I enjoyed parts of it and simply ignored the rest.

Listened today to Morgoth's review and he says it better than I can, so I suggest you check him out. He also does some great classic film reviews with Endeavor, so give him a try.


or his bitchute channel


Like Skynet, Matrix 4 is self-aware and tries to have a joke at its audience's expense, including a giant neon sign in the opening fight sequence that says, "For those who like to eat shit."

However, the joke is really on the Wachowski's because nothing they have done can get past the fact that they have no new or original ideas to offer. And although the reboot has adapted some of the previous characters from the oughties into more current iterations: the masonic god architect has become a psychiatric control freak and explicit transformation into agents has been replaced with quicker and less dramatic release of the NPC's or MKULTRAs, who are more numerous than agents could ever be in a properly functioning matrix, they're still just regurgitating old ideas like any post-modern franchise.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Woodpecker
Orthodox
“Best of the Best” starring Phillip Rhee, Eric Roberts, Chris Penn, and James Earl Jones.

A martial arts movie made for men. The MC Eric Roberts is a widower and doting white father to his only son which is next to unheard of in Hollywood.

He befriends Tommy Lee who is the team’s best fighter. I like how Tommy and Eric Roberts form a natural and organic male friendship. I hate that we don’t see this anymore without a bunch of Tumblr and Reddit degenerates “shipping” two guys who had a conversation with one another.

Chris Penn is the resident redneck badass and while the film makes a few jokes at his expense, he’s still portrayed as an unequivocal good guy against the Koreans. It doesn’t hurt that Penn steals damn near every scene that he’s in.

There’s a vegan Buddhist white guy on the team that gets steamrolled in the finals which made me LOL. Also Eric Roberts doesn’t end up simping for the token Blonde coach.

Throw in a powerful 80s rock soundtrack, some excellent TKD choreography and a satisfying ending and you have arguably the best martial arts film ever made.

No nudity or excessive swearing either.

We had this movie on VHS when I was a kid, probably watched it at least 5 times. Yes, great action. It has everything a classic 1980s action movie would have.
 

An0dyne

Robin
Other Christian
So I just got back from Spiderman: No Way Home.

I was already a big fan of both the other movies in this series. I think they worked well as good movies in other genres with Superhero elements (the highschool coming of age movie in the first one, the Eurotrip travel flick in the second).

This third one really upped the game though. It starts right where the last one left off. Spiderman goes to Dr. Strange to try to undo the reveal of his identity in part 2, which basically leads to a multiverse opening up with evil villains from past films appearing. Spiderman at first tries to trap them but (inspired by his aunt) tries to remove their wicked ways instead.

Of course, this isn't as simple as all that as people consumed with evil forces find themselves attached to the 'dark side' and view it as a vital part of who they are. Quite a powerful theme really, and who cannot relate to that feeling that their satan influenced side is somehow something they need? One thing I found interesting was how this movie was not about destroying the enemy buy about learning to understand that villains have good in them and can be redeemed through compassion. You could argue this is all very sappy but I feel like Spiderman is forced to confront his vengeful rage and overcome it in a hard earned personal victory. Due to the fact it is a superhero movie, the good does effectively have to be physically beaten into people in a way not too dissimilar to killing them. Yet the message of loving even ones enemies and trying to hope they can be redeemed is a positive one from a Christian perspective.

I don't want to spoilt too much but basically, what Spiderman also learns from the other Spiderman universe(s) is a kind of fatalistic reality: he will have to face suffering and loss and that it is unavoidable. Yet loss is a vital part of his maturity - he absorbs the lessons learnt from this and that then becomes part of who he is. The idea that pain and loss are needed for growth and maturity could hopefully be a slap in the face for the soy boy fanbase of these movies.

There is another type of sacrifice that Spiderman must make in this movie that nearly brought a tear to my eye. There is nothing more powerful to me in movies that when a character has to let go of something they hold dear to them for the greater good (See Casablanca, Toy Story 3, Manhattan and even Avengers: Infinity War). Sacrifice is an important Christ derived ideal and while in this movie I had a few issues as to the real world consequences of this and how it would actually work (giving me more of a headache than the intended gut punch to the heart) it was still far more moving than any other entry in this series.

There were several characters from past incarnations of these movies I didn't expect to see again and there was humour from these interactions as well as a good deal of nostalgia (in particular when friends and foes from the first trilogy pop up).

You could argue that the past two movies in this trilogy were escapist low stakes affairs but I feel like what made this one stand out is it had real world consequences for Spiderman in a number of universes.
Came here to post about this too. I also noticed that the film had a number of based undertones. Spiderman’s situation at the beginning had a LOT of similarities to Kyle Rittenhouse. And was portrayed in a positive light. The media in contrast was portrayed poorly as divisive fake news peddlers. It also provided an interesting social commentary on the polarized ideologies in the country today. Meanwhile, MJ was a fairly feminine supportive figure, rather than having to take the center stage and fight crime herself. A good womanly role model in that respect. I also personally appreciated the frank take on mental health issues and the prison industrial complex. All in all, a pretty good film—particularly with all the high stakes nuance you mentioned.
 

ScannerLIV

Woodpecker
Saw Matrix Resurrections yesterday evening. I was expecting 100% unwatchable trash, so the bar was pretty low, and even though it was well over two hours long, I enjoyed parts of it and simply ignored the rest.

Listened today to Morgoth's review and he says it better than I can, so I suggest you check him out. He also does some great classic film reviews with Endeavor, so give him a try.


or his bitchute channel


Like Skynet, Matrix 4 is self-aware and tries to have a joke at its audience's expense, including a giant neon sign in the opening fight sequence that says, "For those who like to eat shit."

However, the joke is really on the Wachowski's because nothing they have done can get past the fact that they have no new or original ideas to offer. And although the reboot has adapted some of the previous characters from the oughties into more current iterations: the masonic god architect has become a psychiatric control freak and explicit transformation into agents has been replaced with quicker and less dramatic release of the NPC's or MKULTRAs, who are more numerous than agents could ever be in a properly functioning matrix, they're still just regurgitating old ideas like any post-modern franchise.

I don't care to watch this movie, let alone pay for it but any good action scene? Seems to be the best part was already revealed in the trailer when two agents entered the hallway-the way the agent glided through the door from what seems like space or alternative dimension was the coolest part of the trailer-as they hunted down bugs and that black folk.
 

Grow Bag

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Hello Godfather Part 2.

I saw Don't Look Up because it was on netflix and DiCaprio is in it. If it was in theaters probably wouldn't have made the drive. Man, what a piece of junk. Nearly every aspect of this movie was bad. The only thing decent was the acting, but the characters were so one note and boring. They never even got into the science of the comet hurdling toward Earth. The editing was terrible, so choppy. Endless social media montages. A pop star sings a song that is meant to be funny, but is just dumb.
I got about 15 minutes in with Don't Look Up before I switched off. The whole blacks as the bosses, blacks as the academic high achievers thing is so tedious you'd think they'd find another role for them in their parallel universe. Better still, just stop the tokenism, but the Woke can't do that. Wokeness & comedy are antithetical.
 

MartyMcFly

Kingfisher
Other Christian
I recently watched this movie for the second time and liked it even better than the first time I watched it. Most French movies I have seen are not very good but this one is a good story about friendship from 2 different social classes (a common theme but it can often make a good story). The 2 main actors did a really good job and there were a lot of good comedic moments. The movie itself is positive and shows how some people in bad situations have potential for improvement if they are given the opportunity. What I liked is that the young man did not treat the man in the wheelchair with pity and instead was straightforward. They both helped each other which is a sign of a good friendship. This is based on a true story although the immigrant changed from being from Algeria to Senegal because the directors liked Omar Sy in another movie.

 

Tom Slick

Woodpecker
Orthodox
I don't care to watch this movie, let alone pay for it but any good action scene?

I don't think there were any good action scenes, except maybe the opening sequence was alright. However, the on-screen character is a purple-haired, Southeast Asian girl with an accent. It's not a heavy accent, but I couldn't understand her much of the time and the forced diversity took away from the action.

I watched Matrix Resurrections knowing it wasn't going to be as good as the first. I had to download the first one to forget about the new one.

Money-grab garbage.

I paid $4 at the cinema in order to reminisce about how things were back in '99 and also to look for in-jokes. I was curious how the film and its producers would deal with the problem of making a movie that not only has nearly nothing new to offer, but that shows footage of its first installment for extended periods. Their solution of a plot line where the great rebel, Neo, has been commodified and is sold with happy meal trinkets is kinda cute.

It's a quirk of mine that I find movies with blatantly obvious symbolism to be hilarious, stuff like: Snow Piercer (2013), Cube (1997), and Chinese Box (1997), and as bad as Matrix 4 was, at least its makers don't hate their audience, even when they make self-referential meta-trash like this, whereas a director like David Lynch has nothing but contempt for his fans and constantly mocks and demoralizes them, but they still flock to his films.

Even though the Wachowskis have made real some of their sci-fi fantasy by going tranny, they don't seem mean-spirited, unlike like Lynch or Alexander Payne, who are but a couple of the classic demoralization experts who were making films at the same time as the original Matrix was released.

Although Matrix 4 was a bad movie, it didn't make me feel bad.
 
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