The new browser from Mozilla's shitlording former CEO

Enigma

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
brave_browser_logo.jpg


If you recall, Mozilla's former CEO was forced to resign a couple years ago when it was discovered that he supported anti-gay marriage legislation in California.

Well, now he's got his own browser out, called Brave.

The browser has built-in ad and tracker blocking, which not only enhances privacy but makes web browsing way faster.

I'd actually been using it for the past couple weeks without knowing who started it, and it's definitely very smooth. It's still in the early stages in terms of features, but supposedly it's already faster than Chrome, Firefox, and IE.

You can find out more here: https://techcrunch.com/2016/08/01/b...er-from-former-mozilla-ceo-grabs-4-5-million/

And you can download here: https://www.brave.com/
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I'm not talking about privacy, I'm talking about speed. Tor is slow as shit, especially when you're behind a VPN. If you're doing something that's particularly secretive, that's great, but when I'm just researching things online, I don't have time to waste with that.

Also, the anti-SJW angle is a good one.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Catholic
Gold Member
I was supremely disappointed by Brendan's firing. MikeCF shared Brave on Twitter a few months ago, and I've been using it on mobile since.

Overall great experience, highly recommend. I'll be checking out the desktop version soon.

This is how the war is won.
 

Thomas the Rhymer

Ostrich
Gold Member
In the long term, they plan on making you pay a monthly subscription for using Brave.

Unless you allow Brave to show ads. In which case you allegedly share 'anonymous' info about yourself and then you get to see targeted ads specifically designed not to slow down your internet browsing.

So they want you either to pay with money or pay with your data. Their long term plan is not to provide ad-free internet, rather they are trying to build up their own alternative ad infrastructure.

Their long term diabolical plan to make you pay for using a web browser is detailed here:
https://blog.brave.com/braves-payment-spec-out-for-developer-input/
 

Il Bersagliere

Pelican
Gold Member
Thomas the Rhymer said:
In the long term, they plan on making you pay a monthly subscription for using Brave.

Unless you allow Brave to show ads. In which case you allegedly share 'anonymous' info about yourself and then you get to see targeted ads specifically designed not to slow down your internet browsing.

So they want you either to pay with money or pay with your data. Their long term plan is not to provide ad-free internet, rather they are trying to build up their own alternative ad infrastructure.

Their long term diabolical plan to make you pay for using a web browser is detailed here:
https://blog.brave.com/braves-payment-spec-out-for-developer-input/

And this is why I prefer my software open-source. I was just raving about the browser to a buddy of mine of Skype.

Oh well, it was nice while it lasted.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Thomas the Rhymer said:
In the long term, they plan on making you pay a monthly subscription for using Brave.

Unless you allow Brave to show ads. In which case you allegedly share 'anonymous' info about yourself and then you get to see targeted ads specifically designed not to slow down your internet browsing.

So they want you either to pay with money or pay with your data. Their long term plan is not to provide ad-free internet, rather they are trying to build up their own alternative ad infrastructure.

Their long term diabolical plan to make you pay for using a web browser is detailed here:
https://blog.brave.com/braves-payment-spec-out-for-developer-input/

I'm not an expert on the subject by any means, but the post you just linked to claims they will pay YOU, the user, when you allow it to show ads. And the ads you see will be "replacement ads".

You only pay if you want to see no ads whatsoever.

"For ad-replacement mode, once an ad campaign is reconciled and our advertising partners pay us, the total views from the ad-replacement users are aggregated into a weighted list for publishers. From the total payment, our ad-matching partner takes a share (15%), we take our share (15%), we reserve the user revenue share of the total payment (15%) for ad-replacement users, and the remaining amount is allocated to the publishers (e.g., 55%). The payment to each publisher is then calculated using the weighted-ratio method. In order to enhance privacy, the payment to each ad-replacement user is calculated independently of the actual ad impressions served to that user – Brave Software does not keep track of which users were served which impressions.

So, what happens when you're in ad-replacement mode? The Brave Ledger makes a transfer of the user revenue share to your Brave wallet! You have two choices: you can "donate" the funds to your favorite sites (this is the automated default); or you can transfer the funds to another Bitcoin wallet and spend them yourself. However, in order to take money out of the system, Anti-money laundering (AML) and Know your customer (KYC) regulations require that Brave Software verifies your identity. If you choose to verify your identity, then you'll need to demonstrate control of a phone number and an email address. Even so, there will be no way for Brave Software to correlate your browsing history with payments to your wallet."

Il Bersagliere said:
And this is why I prefer my software open-source. I was just raving about the browser to a buddy of mine of Skype.

Oh well, it was nice while it lasted.

Brave is open source, as far as I know. That's what it says on their website and that's what it's been reported as.
 

The Beast1

Peacock
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
What are the technical specs on this browser?

What's the javascript engine based on?

Genuinely curious, I'd like to stop using Chrome.
 

WalkingMan

Woodpecker
Ad blocking is something I'd consider paying for. It's surprising how much faster pages can load when they aren't drowned in ads. Nothing in life is free.
 

WalkingMan

Woodpecker
This is the clincher for me right here, and for plenty of other people:

"Because of its ad-blocking and script-blocking features, mobile users will also see less battery consumption and data usage."

10yje.gif
 

Phoenix

 
Banned
Il Bersagliere said:
And this is why I prefer my software open-source. I was just raving about the browser to a buddy of mine of Skype.

Oh well, it was nice while it lasted.

Turns out that other people want to get paid for their work too...

There's no such thing as a free lunch. Open-source software suffers from something called "being a steaming pile of crap". Take any open-source software and compare it to it's best paid competitor and it can only hope to be 10% as good. When you pay, everything just works, everything works good and in ways you've never imagined it could. Just take a look at [shudder] Gimp versus Photoshop.

The only time apparently free software is free is where you can't see how you're being monetized. Either you're free guinea pigs and word-spreaders for the developers who then collect big consulting fees from corporate customers who want installation/customization/support etc (this forum software is an example). Or in the case of Mozilla and its "google is the default search engine" contract with Google, from which they get most of their money -- and in turn Google gets another pillar of search engine hegemony.
 

anthony

Pelican
Catholic
I have used Epic Browser https://www.epicbrowser.com/ in the past. It is based on Chromium and seems to be in constant beta. Plus whatever proxy they go through to hide you (???) isn't the greatest.

I have been waiting for Brave to mature and it seems a version 1.0 is coming out soon.
 

anthony

Pelican
Catholic
Phoenix said:
Turns out that other people want to get paid for their work too...

There's no such thing as a free lunch. Open-source software suffers from something called "being a steaming pile of crap". Take any open-source software and compare it to it's best paid competitor and it can only hope to be 10% as good. When you pay, everything just works, everything works good and in ways you've never imagined it could. Just take a look at [shudder] Gimp versus Photoshop.

I have a differing perspective.

Open Source allows everyone to code review and test the code. You don't need to have it be free to be Open Source. Yes, there is no such thing as a free lunch and software needs to be monetized for value of work. But Open Source does not translate into "free".

Any paid competitor can also suffer from "being a steaming pile of crap". Often times they suffer from "hotsjwceoputsonshortskirtandgoesintoboardroomtobegformoney" such as Theranos.
 

Valentine

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I don't see the benefit over Firefox with this. Free extensions for ad blocking like uBlock Origin and tracking protection via Disconnect or Privacy Badger already exist.

Brave's main selling point is built-in ad and tracker blocking, but they themselves have admitted they're not going permanently block ads, they're merely going to swap existing ads for their own ad network. No thanks, I'll stick to blocking them all thank you.
 

Hotwheels

Crow
Gold Member
WalkingMan said:
Ad blocking is something I'd consider paying for. It's surprising how much faster pages can load when they aren't drowned in ads. Nothing in life is free.

Breitbart doesn't make a dime off me.

Not because I don't want them to make an income, but rather they have so many fucking ads on their site it barely loads at times.

In fact Breitbart is the reason I finally installed adblock.
 
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