The Obsession of Travel and Social Status

DelMarMisty

Sparrow
Woman
Hi all,

I have been reading some opinions about travel in the forum and it has intrigued me to find out more about the source of obsession of travel in recent times. I am not going to lie, I have used travel in the past as personal validation. Even now, I keep think to myself and regretting not seeing a few more places I wanted to see in the world since I may never get the opportunity to again. I want to get your opinions on travel in general? I fell for the whole "cultured" thing and to some extent still haven't been able to shake the feeling of travel as an important aspect in my life. I do think travel appeared less cringe in the 90's when people didn't photograph all their food and famous places, although in the last 5 years it has turned out to be a bit of a joke with the posing and Instagram etc. I mainly enjoyed it because it took me away from the soulless western trap.

Thoughts?
 

Mountaineer

Pelican
Gold Member
There is nothing wrong with travel. Personally I think it is a blessing to be able to go thousands of miles to see some incredible place for yourself. After all God gave us this world. Why can't we see it for ourselves? Just because Roosh strongly associates travel with fornication doesn't mean you should be discouraged. The question is what do you want to get from it. Travel with God. If you experience pleasure, experience it for him. Roosh did that in 2019 and look what came out of it. Personally I'm absolutely satisfied with just being in a place and filling my eyes. I don't care about women, partying, food, drugs, other people taking stupid photos. I hike. I contemplate. I marvel at the vastness and diversity of our planet. Every place that I've been to taught me something and it's a memory no one can steal from me. I treat it as a God's gift.
 
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Leeloo

Woodpecker
Woman
Travel is a great way to learn about the world and our place in it. Being exposed to various landmarks, environments, and lifestyles is such a mind-broadening experience.

However I do agree with the original post that of the travel is Tag The Sponsor style of gratuitous status bragging and signaling, then yes, that culture is gross and shallow.
 

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
I'm at the point where I really only want to travel the U.S., and even then, I only want to soak up small town atmospheres. There are a few cities I wouldn't mind seeing (Nashville comes to mind) but I have ZERO interest in California cities; Las Vegas; Chicago.

Suburbs all look the same no matter the state. So that leaves small towns as truly having a draw for me.

I suppose I'd potentially think the same about small towns in England or Ireland, etc. But London? Paris? No thanks. Maybe 25 years ago; not now.
 

Jen18

Pigeon
Woman
My cousin died in her early 30s in a foreign country, while traveling. I weeped for the fact that she followed all the YOLO propaganda, while never marrying or having children. It's never come up in any family gathering re feminist propaganda ruining any legacy or life that she could've had.

So, yes, I think Travel is extremely overrated and part of pushing the "ANTI DEPRESSANT" propaganda.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
I loved international travel when I was young in my twenties, but I have no desire to even domestically travel now. Having a child/family really changes values and priorities.

In all honestly I traveled a lot to fill a void. The void was being filled with others in the travel group, and seeing new environments.
As a young woman traveling I went with a professional package with other people in a tour bus. You see a lot that way in a short period of time, and it kept me out of trouble. So no pubs unless with the group. The other option was all inclusive resorts that did not require leaving the area when alone.

Traveling was part of "finding the truth, finding life's purpose, and being enriched in the culture." How deceived I was in thinking this, but that was part of the indoctrination. But to the credit I love nature and architecture photography and it was a great experience for that.

Out of the places visited my favourite and most beautiful and peaceful was Assisi Italy. I would like to have retired there with my family.
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
I enjoy traveling and still do with my kids. I wouldn't want to leave them behind to party or anything, just expose them to different cultures, God's creation etc. Since I would never subject my toddler to wearing a mask on a plane (and don't want to myself for the principle of the matter) we will be seeing places we can drive to only. I had a plan to travel with the family for 2 years and show them the world and how privileged we are to live in the US prior to the events of last year, if not to really show them how spoiled children here are, as most the world doesn't have weird gender issues and high amounts of self medication. Also to keep them away from other middle schoolers since that's the age where kids tend to go a different direction depending who their friends are. Now, I'm not sure if this is going to be possible. My thought is that I won't compromise my values, like getting a vaccine or a microchip or whatever to travel. If that is what it comes down to, that is putting comfort and fun over my values, and of course if that is a Mark of the Beast that would be condemning.

When we do travel we do educational things like see museums, visit churches and natural sites, and make an effort to talk to locals. We also make sure to hit up sites that show the evils of Communism/Atheism which is easy to do in Europe and Asia. We stay away from all inclusive resorts and cruises since that's not our thing and they are filled with just eating, drinking, and laying by the pool. I don't think that's inherently bad as people need breaks but I don't really enjoy it myself.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I wish I’d done it when I was younger, but it wasn't a thing when I was that age plus I’ve always been a homebody. I’d love to visit biblical places in Israel. My travel dreams are closer to home these days—Yellowstone in the autumn, the New England coast, Glacier National Park, Grand Canyon, etc. I want to see the 9/11 memorial in NY, but I’m not sure I’d ever really be up to it emotionally. For the past couple of years we’ve been visiting obscure Oregon Trail spots using a detailed book and Trail-specific map. It’s kind of like geocaching but for the Oregon Trail. It’s a lot of fun to work out these locations and successfully find them.
 

dragonfire00

Sparrow
Woman
I'm at the point where I really only want to travel the U.S., and even then, I only want to soak up small town atmospheres. There are a few cities I wouldn't mind seeing (Nashville comes to mind) but I have ZERO interest in California cities; Las Vegas; Chicago.

Suburbs all look the same no matter the state. So that leaves small towns as truly having a draw for me.

I suppose I'd potentially think the same about small towns in England or Ireland, etc. But London? Paris? No thanks. Maybe 25 years ago; not now.
I've been (and lived in a couple) to all the places you mentioned and they were totally different 25 ish years ago and still have historical value (except LV) but I'd never recommend them today lol. I only like the European cities for historical sites, museums etc that showcase Western culture but not to stay in very long, the US does better with natural sights than our cities for sure. If anything they'd be more disappointing, Paris/London and NYC are just depressing :sneaky: would have been nice to have been around for their prime.
 

Ah_Tibor

Woodpecker
Woman
I want to go to the Carpathians to my ancestral villages (in Slovakia and Ukraine), maybe Russia, Turkey, and Egypt. I have some ancestry in Italy (Basilicata region) so wouldn't mind checking that out. I have a Slovak distant cousin (our grandmothers are first cousins and look exactly alike) who found me on FB who was always telling me to go, and he wanted to visit the US too. Slovakia went hard with COVID stuff (they mass tested the entire country, the positivity rate is less than 1% but I think they're just ending their lockdown now) so we're both like yeah, that probably won't happen LOL. My dad visited with his grandfather in 1979 so a lot of things have changed since then.

When I was in college there was a group trip to Istanbul for $1500. I should have went. I doubt international travel is going to be easy in the future the way it's been for the past 20 years.

Otherwise I feel like you can do the same crap anywhere-- eat, shop, hang out on a beach. I'd rather go to a nice lake and roast hot dogs than get on a plane. We went to St. John (US Virgin Island) for our honeymoon and it was beautiful but also packed with rich bums smoking weed so who cares

I also went on a house building trip in Mexico and got bit by a spider and had a huge allergic reaction. They gave me benadryl and steroids and left me alone in the "infirmary" (a shed with a bed) while my heart raced but I also wanted to sleep.

Yeah travel is overrated if it's just for the pictures or consuming the "experience" or lifestyle.
 

Luna Novem

Woodpecker
Woman
I want to go to the Carpathians to my ancestral villages (in Slovakia and Ukraine), maybe Russia, Turkey, and Egypt. I have some ancestry in Italy (Basilicata region) so wouldn't mind checking that out. I have a Slovak distant cousin (our grandmothers are first cousins and look exactly alike) who found me on FB who was always telling me to go, and he wanted to visit the US too. Slovakia went hard with COVID stuff (they mass tested the entire country, the positivity rate is less than 1% but I think they're just ending their lockdown now) so we're both like yeah, that probably won't happen LOL. My dad visited with his grandfather in 1979 so a lot of things have changed since then.

When I was in college there was a group trip to Istanbul for $1500. I should have went. I doubt international travel is going to be easy in the future the way it's been for the past 20 years.

Otherwise I feel like you can do the same crap anywhere-- eat, shop, hang out on a beach. I'd rather go to a nice lake and roast hot dogs than get on a plane. We went to St. John (US Virgin Island) for our honeymoon and it was beautiful but also packed with rich bums smoking weed so who cares

I also went on a house building trip in Mexico and got bit by a spider and had a huge allergic reaction. They gave me benadryl and steroids and left me alone in the "infirmary" (a shed with a bed) while my heart raced but I also wanted to sleep.

Yeah travel is overrated if it's just for the pictures or consuming the "experience" or lifestyle.
I have Ukrainian heritage as well :)
 

Ah_Tibor

Woodpecker
Woman
Back to the original post though I think personal websites and then blogs really started the trend. I remember being on LiveJournal as a teen and thinking I would spend my early 20s travelling around and having fun adventures.

Without really considering the people doing that either have rich parents or a job that requires them to travel (and probably sucks). On the extreme end of the spectrum you have the sluts/prostitute types but that really seems to be recent phenomenon, not that they didn't exist before but now it's easy and celebrated.

I'm actually glad I never travelled or partied because the people who made that into a lifestyle didn't age very well and typically have issues starting a family. A family friend once told me her favorite decade was her 50s because the kids grew up and she and her husband got to do what they wanted, so I think the "do everything when you're young or ypu won't do it" model is wrong and counterproductive. I think you're just less jaded and willing to sleep in a hostel or whatever.
 
Just because Roosh strongly associates travel with fornication doesn't mean you should be discouraged.

Wait until he gets married and realizes you can bring your wife with you. ;)

We traveled abroad and in the US a good deal in the age before cell phones, so travel to us has always been a way to...
  • Get away from the narrow world others impose on us
  • Connect with culture and history up close and personal
  • Develop skills of independence
  • Enjoy each other's company without distractions
We've also considered ourselves very fortunate because not everyone was blessed with the same opportunities. Travel is still like this for us and we often try to go places where we know our cell phones won't work (we also don't have social media).

Millenials made travel cringe-worthy...but in their conformity they seem to stick to all the same places. Just go to different places and remember travel doesn't make you special (like Millenials seem to think)...

If anything, travel teaches you how tiny your life really is in the vastness of the world.
 
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Grow Bag

Kingfisher
Being an older gentleman, I was fortunate enough to have traveled around Europe, or bummed might be a more fitting verb, in the 70s & early 80s. It was a different world altogether than the one we're living in now, so I have different perspective to many here. Most travel was by coach or hitchhiking, as air travel was way too expensive back then. The first time I traveled to Athens it took 3 days rather than hours, which, though uncomfortable, meant that the senses could take in the changes of landscape, culture and climate. It also meant that as a destination is was out of reach for those who were unwilling to put up with the 3 day slog to get there.

Because I traveled in the 70s, when I was in Holland, France, Germany, Poland, Italy, Greece, etc., I met mostly Dutch, German, Polish, Italian and Greek people. Multiculturalism was in it's early stages in most of Europe, as was the export of American corporate culture. In retrospect, I'd say I saw the last days of Europe before it was infected with the poz.

By far the most pronounced changes have occurred in Greece. Back then it was still a breathtakingly beautiful country, with a rich culture and where one could still have a sense of it's antiquity. It pained me to see how it was changing for the worse when I revisited in the 90s. I wouldn't dare visit now, it would tarnish my memories. Back then it was mostly still agrarian, though tourism was beginning to effect some negative changes in some of the more popular resorts. People were poor by Western standards, yet they were often so generous and had a strong sense of who they were as a people. I think now that poverty is a great preserver of values and culture and affluence is the great destroyer.

I often stayed in small villages where I'd find agricultural work. In the evenings after work the men would gather in the kafenions (bar/cafe) to drink an ouzo or beer and they'd often steer the conversation around to how rich my country was. It betrayed an envy in them that I'd try to counter, but my Greek wasn't quite proficient enough to flesh out my argument. The best I could do was tell that what they still have, we have lost and mores the pity. I couldn't tell them that I admired the simplicity and slow pace of life, that there was a complementary demarcation between a man and woman's world, that most homes were uncluttered with gadgets and the only TV was in the kafeneion. But it only takes one TV in a village to sow the seeds.
 

Tippy

Robin
I think the idea of it's great but the reality is often depressing. It's kind of like fornication in that sense. It's an empty experience in a lot of ways. But it's powerful and overwhelms the senses so if we live empty lives, we think this is meaningful. Really it's just a sensory overload.
 

Jen18

Pigeon
Woman
Again, my cousin's death was so tragic to me b/c it could have been prevented had she followed God's Will. And even after death, her family struggles to understand that her death was mainly due to secular/satanic YOLO propaganda.
 

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
Jen, I’m so sorry about your cousin. May I ask if she died due to being in a foreign country, or did she just happen to be there when she died? I’d think dying so far away from home would be a lonely experience, although I suppose dying is lonely regardless.
 
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