The Orthodox Church

rotekz

Ostrich
Gold Member
Teedub said:
I heard based British nationalist Nick Griffin say that he's started attending the Russian Orthodox church near where he lives, as its the only form of Christianity in Britain that isn't pozzed, and in his words "is almost identical to the Anglo Saxon chuch before 1066". [Go to around 1:00:00]
There is a superb little e-book by Fr Andrew Phillips called 'Orthodox Christianity and the Old English Church'. It is available for free here: http://orthodoxengland.org.uk/zresources.htm
 

FilipSRB

Woodpecker
Despite the pressures from the media and to the horror of local liberals the Serbian Orthodox Church is still holding Liturgies and still giving Holy Communion from the same cup and with the same spoon.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Teedub said:
I heard based British nationalist Nick Griffin say that he's started attending the Russian Orthodox church near where he lives, as its the only form of Christianity in Britain that isn't pozzed, and in his words "is almost identical to the Anglo Saxon chuch before 1066". [Go to around 1:00:00]

And, I'd also come across ROCOR priest Father Spyridon via Roosh's twitter feed. There's a couple of books by him on amazon, I've bought Journey to Mount Athos. Just wondering if any of you knew much about any of his other works?
I've heard a lot of good things about Fr. Spyridon's Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan, but I haven't read it yet. It's also something of an unofficial sequel to Fr. Seraphim Rose's Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future, so you may want to read that first.

The British Isles, especially Ireland, being Orthodox up until the Norman Conquests is pretty much the accepted view in most of the Orthodox world. Alfred the Great, for instance, is highly revered in Orthodoxy. The reign of Charlemagne is considered the turning point, so to speak, in France and continental Europe.

There are a couple other English-speaking sources that I can think of who have talked/written about the subject at length, Vladimir Moss (English) and Dr. Matthew Raphael Johnson (American), but they're both schismatics (belong to non-canonical churches), so you have to take some of the stuff they talk about with a grain of salt.

Vladimir Moss ebook on fall of Orthodox England.

Matt Johnson podcast on Orthodox England and Alfred the Great.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Speaking of Fr. Rose, I recently finished reading the massive but very good biography of his life, written by Heiromonk Damascene.

The book references Fr. Rose's magazine, The Orthodox Word, quite a lot, so I went looking for back issues and found out that the first 105 issues are available on archive.org for free.

There's a staggering amount of good content in these, particularly on the lives of the Saints, and much of it being translated to English for the first time or being pulled from rather obscure/rare sources.
 

Goni

Robin
Enigma said:
Teedub said:
I heard based British nationalist Nick Griffin say that he's started attending the Russian Orthodox church near where he lives, as its the only form of Christianity in Britain that isn't pozzed, and in his words "is almost identical to the Anglo Saxon chuch before 1066". [Go to around 1:00:00]

And, I'd also come across ROCOR priest Father Spyridon via Roosh's twitter feed. There's a couple of books by him on amazon, I've bought Journey to Mount Athos. Just wondering if any of you knew much about any of his other works?
I've heard a lot of good things about Fr. Spyridon's Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan, but I haven't read it yet. It's also something of an unofficial sequel to Fr. Seraphim Rose's Orthodoxy and the Religion of the Future, so you may want to read that first.

The British Isles, especially Ireland, being Orthodox up until the Norman Conquests is pretty much the accepted view in most of the Orthodox world. Alfred the Great, for instance, is highly revered in Orthodoxy. The reign of Charlemagne is considered the turning point, so to speak, in France and continental Europe.

There are a couple other English-speaking sources that I can think of who have talked/written about the subject at length, Vladimir Moss (English) and Dr. Matthew Raphael Johnson (American), but they're both schismatics (belong to non-canonical churches), so you have to take some of the stuff they talk about with a grain of salt.

Vladimir Moss ebook on fall of Orthodox England.

Matt Johnson podcast on Orthodox England and Alfred the Great.
While it is true that the Great Schism happened in 1054 and before officially the Christisn Church was 1, we can not say that British isles were Orthodox before 1066.

The catholic dogma had penetrated the west since times of Charlemagne in 700s.

During the Norman invasion British isles were already " catholic".

Among Catholic and Orthodox chuches many saints are the same because it was essentially one institution.
 
Goni said:
While it is true that the Great Schism happened in 1054 and before officially the Christisn Church was 1,
In the year 1053 there was already the Chalcedonians, the non-Chalcedonians, and the Church of the East, all somewhat separate although the lines were blurry. And the 1054 schism was only between Rome and Constantinople; it didn't affect either Church's relationship with Jerusalem, Antioch, Moscow, etc. until long after.

Goni said:
we can not say that British isles were Orthodox before 1066.

The catholic dogma had penetrated the west since times of Charlemagne in 700s.

During the Norman invasion British isles were already " catholic".
What did the Church of England teach, before the Norman conquest, that was heterodox?
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Goni said:
While it is true that the Great Schism happened in 1054 and before officially the Christisn Church was 1, we can not say that British isles were Orthodox before 1066.

The catholic dogma had penetrated the west since times of Charlemagne in 700s.

During the Norman invasion British isles were already " catholic".

Among Catholic and Orthodox chuches many saints are the same because it was essentially one institution.
Right, and Orthodox consider that original, united Church to be an Orthodox institution, while Catholics obviously regard it as a Catholic one.

However, what is questioned by almost no one is that Pope Alexander II blessed the Norman invasion of England, and he did so to bring England and its church under the authority of Rome.

From New Advent, a Catholic encyclopedia:

The repudiation of this oath by Harold at the Confessor's death enabled William to assume the character of an avenger of perjury. He was probably sincere enough in believing himself constituted by God champion of the Church, and in obtaining from Pope Alexander II not only a blessing on his enterprise, but the gift of a specially consecrated banner as for a religious crusade. A century later Henry II, when projecting his conquest of Ireland, adopted a similar rôle. At the same time it is not now disputed by impartial historians (e.g. H. C. Davis, or C. Oman) that the claim to establish a better order of things was in fact justified by the event. "The Norman Conquest", says H. C. Davis, "raised the English to that level of culture which the continental people had already reached and left it for the Plantagenets of Anjou to make England in her turn 'a leader among nations'."

...

On the other hand, St. Gregory himself commended the king for the zeal he had shown in securing the freedom of the Church, and he was content, while such a spirit prevailed, to leave the sovereign practically free in his appointments to English bishoprics. Altogether Mr. C. Oman does not exaggerate when he tells us that before the Conquest "the typical faults of the dark ages, pluralism, simony, lax observance of the canons, contented ignorance, worldliness in every aspect, were all too prevalent in England"; but he adds that by the Conqueror's wise policy "the condition of the Church alike in the matter of spiritual zeal, of hard work and of learning, was much improved".
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15642c.htm

If England was Catholic, why did it need to be invaded and reformed? Why did William remove and replace all of the English bishops, even re-locating their sees?

This was not a case of an individual English king simply being excommunicated; multiple Popes considered the English church to be guilty of rejecting both Rome's authority and at least some Catholic dogmas. This is not an Orthodox argument, it's what Catholics themselves claimed.
 
Christ is risen!



Here we see Christ rising, the gates of Hades smashed beneath him as he lifts Adam and Eve from their graves into life eternal. Satan lies beneath him, pathetic and defeated. On the left are King David, Solomon the Wise, and John the Baptist. On the left are Abel, Moses, and the prophet Isaiah, all bearing witness to Christ's resurrection.

"A certain brother brought fresh loaves into his cell, and invited his elders to table. And when they had eaten a farl apiece, they stopped. But the brother, knowing their trevail of abstinence, began humbly to entreat them, saying, "For God's sake, eat this day until ye are filled." And they ate another ten. Behold therefore how these that were true monks and sincere in abstinence did eat more than they had need of, for God's sake." The Sayings of the Fathers 4:64

Enjoy your mimosas and steaks today, for God's sake!
 
Emperor Constantine said:
I feel somewhat ripped off for not having been exposed to Psalm 151 until adulthood. It's interesting that David announces that he has taken away reproach from the children of Israel by defeating Goliath: he understood that allowing the godless to triumph was a sin of cowardice.
From Sir Lancelot Brenton's translation:

Psalm 151
1 This Psalm is a genuine one of David, though supernumerary, composed when he fought in single combat with Goliad.
I was small among my brethren, and youngest in my father's house: I tended my father's sheep.
2 My hands formed a musical instrument, and my fingers tuned a psaltery.
3 And who shall tell my Lord? the Lord himself, he himself hears.
4 He sent forth his angel, and took me from my father's sheep, and he anointed me with the oil of his anointing.
5 My brothers were handsome and tall; but the Lord did not take pleasure in them.
6 I went forth to meet the Philistine; and he cursed me by his idols.
7 But I drew his own sword, and beheaded him, and removed reproach from the children of Israel.
Where's Psalm 151? My Bible only goes to Psalm 150.
 
BigFellow said:
Where's Psalm 151? My Bible only goes to Psalm 150.
Psalm 151 is included as an appendix in the Septuagint – the Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible popular amongst the first Christians. Later, when the Jews standardized their Hebrew text of the Old Testament, they did not include Psalm 151.

So it just depends on which text your Bible is translated from. The standard Old Testament for the Orthodox is the Septuagint, so we include Psalm 151. Protestants and RCs typically translate from the rabbinic Hebrew text, so they don’t normally include it. The above translation, though, was done by Sir Lancelot Brenton, a Protestant.

I should add that it’s in the dead sea scrolls, debunking the once-popular idea among Western scholars that it was never part of the Hebrew text. It's outside the number, or "supernumerary" in Brenton's translation, and none of the Orthodox Churches use it in the Liturgy except for the Armenians.
 

Mountaineer

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Roosh said:
Powerful interview:

Thank you for sharing this. I always appreciated the value of being humble, didn't know why but it felt right. Now I know it's a blessing given to us by God.
 
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