Church The Orthodox Church

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Had another, more formal, meeting with the head Priest. The church is part of the OCA (Orthodox Church in America).

Unfortunately, all liturgy/services are done outdoors and almost all the clergymen are masked. Tonight was a zoom call with the priest and about 5 other newcomers. 3 of the people were on board and interested, while 2 (spouses) were skeptical and/or unfamiliar with the faith (as they were american prots).

The priest is very knowledgeable, anti-communism, on fire for the faith. One tidbit: he goes off on tangents and rambles a bit. We were supposed to introduce ourselves and we all spent 5-10 min but he went on for a half hour about every minor detail; not a huge deal but maybe this is common with priests? The first time I spoke with him (a couple weeks ago) he went on for an hour about various details.

The process of becoming a catechumen is over a year. It's weekly (~50 sessions) of zoom and/or in person meetings. I'm open to this commitment, but is this a common practice/procedure?

There's a couple other local churches here (Syriac, Coptic, Romanian)...but I'm not sure if I would "fit it" to these as well as the OCA (any input here would be appreciated).
I would look for a ROCOR or Antiochian parish above OCA.
 

DanielH

Pelican
Orthodox
In general Roosh, why do you recommend those above OCA?
Where I am the OCA parishes are forced to use multiple spoons for communion. That sounds like a silly thing to take issue with but many interpret that as the hierarchs saying that the body and blood of Christ can spread disease, when even scientific studies have shown there is no evidence of disease being spread through communion, ever.
 

Blade Runner

Pelican
Orthodox
Where I am the OCA parishes are forced to use multiple spoons for communion. That sounds like a silly thing to take issue with but many interpret that as the hierarchs saying that the body and blood of Christ can spread disease, when even scientific studies have shown there is no evidence of disease being spread through communion, ever.

Let's just say I am very familiar with this and other issues, as I have posted on them before. I just wanted to be open ended to see where exactly Roosh was coming from, and why. I have stated on this forum that sadly, the OCA and GOA have been lacking, in many respects.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
In general Roosh, why do you recommend those above OCA?
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I came across this story today, about an Orthodox church in Chernobyl that's remained open since the disaster there.

"Even during the most difficult days of 1986, the area around the St. Elijah Church was clean (from radiation - IF), not to mention that the church itself was also clean," president of the Ukrainian Chernobyl Union Yury Andreyev said in a Kiev-Moscow video conference on Wednesday.

Now, the territory adjacent to the church has a background level of 6 microroentgen per hour compared with 18 in Kiev. [Note: Kiev is the capital and is over 50 miles away from Chernobyl]

Andreyev also said many disaster liquidators are former atheists. "We came to believe later, after observing such developments which could be explained only by God's will," he says.

 

Blade Runner

Pelican
Orthodox

Thanks, I didn't see that. I enjoyed your analysis there.
 
Where did you hear this?

It's common knowledge; you can ask a Roman Catholic if you're unsure. I should give a caveat, though: I'm using Orthodox terms.

In 1 Corinthians 10-12, St. Paul explains that the Church is the body of Christ, because we commune with his flesh and blood, and that all the baptized participate in that relationship. Priests have a responsibility to make sure no one partakes in Christ's flesh and blood unworthily, so sometimes they put someone out of communion (in Latin, excommunicare) as part of their penance after confession. It used to be done for long periods of time, but these days most priests won't excommunicate someone for more than a week.

During the centuries of separation from orthodoxy, Rome came to mean something different by the word Church, and therefore something different by the word excommunicate. For them, the word Church refers primarily to the organization, so for them excommunication means formal expulsion from the organization. As a result, they don't call it excommunication when they put kids out of communion.
 

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
This weekend I went to a special consecration service at my local parish in north Georgia, and saw none other than Roosh!

The church he's attending in Alabama has a relationship with my parish and their priest invited him to come to our ceremony. Was great getting to hang out with him for a bit.
It's hard to judge a parish from a couple of services, but yours was one of the best I've visited. Strong community, lots of families, and a great priest.
 
Met with the Priest again.

The couple cons: won't shake my hand (covid). A bit nice/submissive - gives off a very meek for the sake of priesthood vibe (not sure if that's good or bad)

The pros (lots of them): He has amazing theology and knowledge. His understanding of history, the church, and the faith is amazing. We shared the same sentiment on the dislike for the debauchery in the west and he wasn't beating around the bush at all. He was also somehow redpilled on Zi0nism western influences. He said he's not pro Judaism, that there's lots of mason/kabalah influences there, and that the wallstreet/hollywood origins are all global (((banking money))).

Overall the convo was great and I am on the same page with him in many ways. Are all orthodox priests this redpilled, or has he uniquely done his homework?
 

The Resilient

Ostrich
Orthodox
Met with the Priest again.

The couple cons: won't shake my hand (covid). A bit nice/submissive - gives off a very meek for the sake of priesthood vibe (not sure if that's good or bad)

The pros (lots of them): He has amazing theology and knowledge. His understanding of history, the church, and the faith is amazing. We shared the same sentiment on the dislike for the debauchery in the west and he wasn't beating around the bush at all. He was also somehow redpilled on Zi0nism western influences. He said he's not pro Judaism, that there's lots of mason/kabalah influences there, and that the wallstreet/hollywood origins are all global (((banking money))).

Overall the convo was great and I am on the same page with him in many ways. Are all orthodox priests this redpilled, or has he uniquely done his homework?


Out of my experience, that's pretty unique
 

Aboulia

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Met with the Priest again.

The couple cons: won't shake my hand (covid). A bit nice/submissive - gives off a very meek for the sake of priesthood vibe (not sure if that's good or bad)

The pros (lots of them): He has amazing theology and knowledge. His understanding of history, the church, and the faith is amazing. We shared the same sentiment on the dislike for the debauchery in the west and he wasn't beating around the bush at all. He was also somehow redpilled on Zi0nism western influences. He said he's not pro Judaism, that there's lots of mason/kabalah influences there, and that the wallstreet/hollywood origins are all global (((banking money))).

Overall the convo was great and I am on the same page with him in many ways. Are all orthodox priests this redpilled, or has he uniquely done his homework?

Being "redpilled" depends on the person. The first Orthodox "priest" I ever met was a Jewish convert from Anglicanism, and he disgusted me by his impiety (he used crude humor, and stated that all religions are basically the same). But if you do listen to the services (if they're in a language you understand), it speaks many times of the Jews and the role they played in murdering Jesus Christ, and how they tried to hide his resurrection.

There are priests who do it for the money/social status, and there are priests who do it out of piety. It's understandable that he refuses to shake your hand in these times assuming he's the one you mentioned earlier practicing outdoor liturgies, it seems he's paying lip service to the regime to stay out of trouble.

Thanks for all the responses. A couple more topics I'd like to learn more about:

4) Apostolic Succession - I was raised not to accept this because it's like a game of telephone. Many Catholics cite 'Peter was the first pope, and the authority transferred thousands of years to present day.' But many Prots cite Catholic corruption, power, or theology such as indulgences that leaves a sour taste in their mouths. Can anyone clarify this or give more info about apostolic succession?

5) The dead - I would still like to follow up on this. From my understanding Jesus didn't visit Lazarus to pay respects to the dead, but to visit him while sick and then he raised him from the dead? I can see remembering or honoring a dead friend/relative, but a concept that I don't fully understand is my Catholic neighbor who has a favorite saint they pray to?

Thank you all again for your answers. I've read them all and appreciate your responses.

DanielH touched on this, but I don't think he emphasized it enough. Orthodoxy is about Truth. Apostolic succession is not a game of telephone, otherwise there could be no justification in calling others heretics. Ideas are heretical because they don't conform to the reality of the world, and will lead to hell on earth if they're followed. The sole purpose of apostolic succession is to hand down the faith as it was understood by the apostles, they don't hand down the power to decide what is correct, they hand down correct doctrine, or they end up anathematizing themselves by an untrue confession of the faith.

I can't speak for your neighbour, but when we are baptized, we take upon Christian names, quite often the name of a saint who we may pray to, people may struggle with certain things in their life, who they pray to certain saints who have overcome the specific passion that's troubling them. One other thing that's good to remember, is that God, through the saints preserved the church, and it's worthwhile to remember them, just as you are only here since your ancestors struggled and sacrificed to continue life.

Personally though, I'd really like to forget the guy who invented daylight savings time.
 

DelMarMisty

Robin
Woman
Orthodox
Can someone explain to me the iconography issue between Orthodox Christianity and Catholicism in a simple way. I have a general understanding of the schism etc. but would there be other reasons why Catholics are so offended by Icons. I have Catholic friends and I can see them feeling uncomfortable that I have Christ Panocrator on my wall. I cannot imagine walking into a empty Church with no images, I mean, what is the issue here? Let me know if there is a better place to post this question.
 
Top