The Plane Crash Thread

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
I’ve been fascinated watching a Smithsonian Channel series that analyzes various plane crashes. And with the recent 737 Max in the news and piquing everyone’s interest in plane crashes, I thought a plane crash thread was warranted. I’ll post information here about famous plane crashes, and feel free to discuss.

I’ll start with an unbelievable crash. United 232 in 1989, which in mid flight blew an engine and lost all their hydraulics and thus most of the control of the aircraft, a DC-10 with nearly 300 souls on board. The pilots ended up controlling the aircraft with the throttle. A DC-10 training pilot was sitting in first class as a civilian and was called up to the cockpit to help (Denny Fitch, see video of his story below). Denny controlled the throttles while standing up between the pilot and first officer.

They were headed from Denver to Chicago, but were flying over Iowa when their trouble started. They ended up crash landing in Sioux City Iowa. 185 people survived it (including all the pilots) while 112 died in the crash.

Here’s video of the crash:


Here’s Denny Fitch’s story of the crash (a fascinating story, he tells it well).


The captain was Al Haynes, who showed great leadership in the cockpit that day. Grace under pressure. He was even (effectively) using humor in the cockpit during this unbelievably tense crisis. Read the cockpit voice recorder transcript here.

https://www.tailstrike.com/190789.htm
 

RIslander

 
Banned
The instructors show that United video every year in annual training at airlines. It is one of the biggest feats in aviation. Those three worked as a perfect team and accomplished the impossible.
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
How about TACA 110? This is similar to the Sully ditching in the Hudson. They were flying a 737 from Mexico to New Orleans, and over the Gulf of Mexico, they lost all their engines. They glided to the edge of Louisiana and spotted some canals, and that was the plan, ditch it in a canal. As they were descending, the copilot spotted a levee (flat with short grass) and the pilot agreed that would be a better landing spot. He was lined up over the canal, so he had to slip it over at the last minute to line up on the levee. He landed there safely, no injuries. The pilot said that was his smoothest landing ever.

tacajpg-89bdbc45122461b1.jpg


levee.jpg
 

Syberpunk

Pelican
Gold Member

But speaking seriously, this was incredible, the pilot landed using one eye.


Edit: I just seen the above post now is related to the same crash
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
I probably should have called this the plane crash/incident thread, cause not all of these are crashes.

Here’s an interesting incident. British Airways 5390 in 1990. The pilot’s windshield broke out, and he got sucked out the window. His crew was able to grab his ankles and keep him from his death.

(Recreation of course).
a-reconstruction-of-pilot-tim-lancasters-legs-being-held-by-a-flight-attendant-image-credit-national-geographic-channel-136398564451002601-150609172658.jpg


They flew like this until they could land:

pinned-136398564470602601


The pilot survived with only minor injuries and was back flying in no time.
 

JayR

Kingfisher
Atheist
PSA Flight 182 has always fascinated me. Collided with an unseen Cessna while coming in for a landing over a residential San Diego neighborhood in 1978. 144 dead including the two in the Cessna and the people in houses on the ground. The crash was captured on video by a nearby cameraman who heard the collision overhead while working on another story.

3jNSxOQ.jpg


The cockpit dialog during the 22 seconds between the collision with the Cessna and ground impact is haunting (from Wikipedia):

09:01:42 ((Sound of thump similar to nose gear door closing))
09:01:45 Captain Whoop!
09:01:46 First officer Aaargh!
09:01:47 ((Sound of impact))
09:01:47 Off-duty captain Oh # #
09:01:49 Captain Easy baby, easy baby
09:01:50 Unknown Yeah
09:01:51 ((Sound of electrical system reactivation tone on voice recorder, system off less than one second))
09:01:51 Captain What have we got here?
09:01:52 First officer It's bad
09:01:52 Captain Huh?
09:01:53 First officer We're hit man, we are hit
09:01:55 Captain (to Lindbergh tower) Tower, we're going down, this is PSA
09:01:57 Lindbergh tower OK, we'll call the equipment for you
09:01:58 Unknown Whoo!
09:01:58 ((Sound of stall warning))
09:01:59 Unknown Bob!
09:01:59 Captain (to Lindbergh tower) This is it, baby!
09:02:00 First officer # # #
09:02:01 Unknown # #
09:02:03 Captain (on intercom, to passengers) Brace yourself
09:02:04 Unknown Hey, baby *
09:02:04 Unknown Ma, I love ya
09:02:04.5 ((Electrical power to recorder stops))

I lived in San Diego for a while and know the crash neighborhood well. There are a couple plaques there to remember the victims.
 

Yatagan

Pelican
Gold Member
The deadliest plane crash in history, where two 747s crashed into each other killing 583 people.


The Tenerife airport disaster was a fatal runway collision between two Boeing 747s on Sunday, March 27, 1977 at Los Rodeos Airport (now Tenerife North Airport) on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands. The crash killed 583 people, making it the deadliest accident in aviation history. As a result of the complex interaction of organizational influences, environmental preconditions, and unsafe acts leading up to this aircraft mishap, the disaster at Tenerife has served as a textbook example for reviewing the processes and frameworks used in aviation mishap investigations and accident prevention.
A bomb explosion at Gran Canaria Airport, and the threat of a second bomb, caused many aircraft to be diverted to Los Rodeos Airport. Among them were KLM Flight 4805 and Pan Am Flight 1736 – the two aircraft involved in the accident. At Los Rodeos Airport, air traffic controllers were forced to park many of the airplanes on the taxiway, thereby blocking it. Further complicating the situation, while authorities waited to reopen Gran Canaria, a dense fog developed at Tenerife, greatly reducing visibility.
When Gran Canaria reopened, the parked aircraft blocking the taxiway at Tenerife required both of the 747s to taxi on the only runway in order to get in position for takeoff. The fog was so thick that neither aircraft could see the other, and the controller in the tower could not see the runway or the two 747s on it. As the airport did not have ground radar, the controller could find where each airplane was only by voice reports over the radio. As a result of several misunderstandings, the KLM flight tried to take off while the Pan Am flight was still on the runway. The resulting collision destroyed both aircraft, killing all 248 aboard the KLM flight and 335 of 396 aboard the Pan Am flight. Sixty-one people aboard the Pan Am flight, including the pilots and flight engineer, survived the disaster.
 

The Lizard of Oz

Crow
Gold Member
Dusty said:
Here’s Denny Fitch’s story of the crash (a fascinating story, he tells it well).


The captain was Al Haynes, who showed great leadership in the cockpit that day. Grace under pressure. He was even (effectively) using humor in the cockpit during this unbelievably tense crisis. Read the cockpit voice recorder transcript here.

https://www.tailstrike.com/190789.htm

That was a great and unforgettable video -- so much to say about it, but I'll just say this: if anyone wants to know what an American is -- the very truest, purest, deepest type -- let them watch this film from beginning to end and they'll have their answer.

Thank you for posting, Dusty.
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
The Lizard of Oz said:
Dusty said:
Here’s Denny Fitch’s story of the crash (a fascinating story, he tells it well).


The captain was Al Haynes, who showed great leadership in the cockpit that day. Grace under pressure. He was even (effectively) using humor in the cockpit during this unbelievably tense crisis. Read the cockpit voice recorder transcript here.

https://www.tailstrike.com/190789.htm

That was a great and unforgettable video -- so much to say about it, but I'll just say this: if anyone wants to know what an American is -- the very truest, purest, deepest type -- let them watch this film from beginning to end and they'll have their answer.

Thank you for posting, Dusty.

It’s funny Lizard, when I watched that video the first time, I thought the exact same thing. The same with the captain, Al Haynes, who reminds me a lot of Sullenberger.

Fitch sadly died from brain cancer in 2012. Haynes is still alive, he’s 87 now. He’s given thousands of speeches on the accident, and donates all the speaking fees to charity.

Here’s some audio of the cockpit voice recorder.


You can hear the tension, and at times near panic. But they stay focused, and even break up the tension with jokes. “I tell you what, we’ll have a beer when this is all over.” “I don’t drink, but I’ll sure as shit have one.”
 

dicknixon72

Pelican
I've binge watched every Air Crash Investigation/Mayday. I like how virtually every Soviet-era crash is something obscenely stupid like not understanding TCAS or letting a kid fly the plane.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
This one happened thirty years ago, but I remember. Aloha Airlines.


The roof blew off!

I don't know if any of you ever flew on Aloha, but it was the coolest airline ever. Then one day it just went out of business.

I flew them a ton interisland. They were all 737's and those dudes flew them hard. And each plane made lots of daily takeoffs and landings. The runways are shorter and potholey. Maui, for example, was like they hads to hit the gas and do a full 180 to get enough speed on the main runway. I'm surprised this was the only accident.

Aloha!
 

Dusty

Peacock
Gold Member
Kona said:
This one happened thirty years ago, but I remember. Aloha Airlines.


The roof blew off!

I don't know if any of you ever flew on Aloha, but it was the coolest airline ever. Then one day it just went out of business.

I flew them a ton interisland. They were all 737's and those dudes flew them hard. And each plane made lots of daily takeoffs and landings. The runways are shorter and potholey. Maui, for example, was like they hads to hit the gas and do a full 180 to get enough speed on the main runway. I'm surprised this was the only accident.

Aloha!

Yeah, that was a crazy one! The roof blew off at 24,000 feet and it sucked one of the flight attendants out and killed her. What a way to go. The other flight attendant dropped to the floor and held on for dear life to a seat mount. I think some of the passengers held her down too. The passengers weren’t blown out because of their seatbelts.

[img=750x500]https://www.aerotime.aero/upload/files/aloha_2.jpg[/img]

The pilot landed that sucker safely. The pilot and copilot couldn’t hear each other due to the noise from the wind, and used hand signals to communicate. At 2:25, you see the survivors shaking the pilots hand.

 

jordypip23

Ostrich
Gold Member
IveBeenFramed said:
One that happened near my hometown. USAir Flight 427...it was a 737 also.


I knew a family whose father passed away in that one. I think that one led to Boeing fixing some faults with the vertical stabilizer. RIP.
 

Kona

Crow
Gold Member
Here's another Hawaii plane crash. A guy on the plane Gopro'd it.


They are state employees on the plane. They went to Kalaupapa on Molokai. It's only accessible by planes like that, or donkeys. It's also a weird and spooky part of the world. Its where the last remaining lepers live, they don't want that spreading, so it's isolated.

Interestingly, the only person who died was the director of the state health department. She so happens to be the lady who verified Obama's birth certificate. Some say the crash was a conspiracy, I say its the evil leprosy spirits cursed the plane. Like I said its spooky over there.

Aloha!
 
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