The Rise Of The Orthosphere

Penitent

Robin
Orthodox
Roosh and other Orthodox forum members,

How do you deal with the ethnic aspect of the Orthodox church? While I do have some Ukrainian blood, I am mostly of Germanic heritage. There's no Germanic Orthodox church that I know of. Is it strange to not be of the ethnicity of the Orthodox branch you've chosen? (If, of course, this applies to you).
The Church in America is a lot more accessible today than it was a generation ago, and we can give thanks to God for that. We have tons of English language literature, and more often than not the services are served in English. The people I learned the Faith from had to be cultural ambassadors, going into ethnic Russian enclaves and assuming the role of a learner. It was not for everybody, you had to be a certain type of person. My Godfather went to a ROCOR parish for 20 years and stood through services which were being sung in Slavonic, not understanding a word of it.
 
Its a weird coincidence that I got into the Manosphere at the same time I was getting started on my Christian journey.

And finding other believers coincidentally there too when initially it was mostly atheist.

Divine Providence when you really pay attention is mostly "coincidences" that just happen especially in the Book of Genesis before the Exodus.

And the Book of Ruth. Where coincidences got people to what they are meant to be.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Gold Member
Roosh and other Orthodox forum members,

How do you deal with the ethnic aspect of the Orthodox church? While I do have some Ukrainian blood, I am mostly of Germanic heritage. There's no Germanic Orthodox church that I know of. Is it strange to not be of the ethnicity of the Orthodox branch you've chosen? (If, of course, this applies to you).

As someone of Anglo-Saxon descent, I feel welcome in ROCOR, where there are many American converts and English/Scottish/Irish saints commemorated on the calendar. ROCOR has seemingly invested more effort than others into integrating the West's Orthodox heritage, and St. John Maximovitch spent much time researching pre-Schism Western Saints. Several weeks ago we commemorated all saints of the British Isles at my (American) parish. Additionally, ROCOR has western rite parishes that serve the ancient Gregorian Mass, the same Orthodox worship as in Western lands in the first millennium.
 

orthobulgarian

Chicken
Orthodox
The main problem with the so called Orthosphere is that is composed mainly by neophytes and newly converts who are trying to project their political views on Orthodoxy instead doing the full conversion. Those people are from non-Orthodox background and are not familiar with the customs, the culture and the ethics of our faith. They want Orthodoxy to be new Evangelical Right but without the zionist stuff.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
The main problem with the so called Orthosphere is that is composed mainly by neophytes and newly converts who are trying to project their political views on Orthodoxy instead doing the full conversion. Those people are from non-Orthodox background and are not familiar with the customs, the culture and the ethics of our faith. They want Orthodoxy to be new Evangelical Right but without the zionist stuff.
I don't see this from Roosh, Brother Augustine, Jay Dyer, PatriarchPrimus, Snek, DavidTheRealMedWhite, or any major figure in the Orthosphere. It's pretty insulting to insinuate someone hasn't had a "full conversion" without very concrete proof. If people have some of the truth through their political beliefs, and they recognize Orthodoxy is the only compatible religion with those beliefs, and then they convert, I don't think that is something to criticize them for. Once they make the decision to convert, there is a lot of catechism and working of The Holy Spirit which follows.

For example, someone could recognize that homosexuality is wrong in and of itself, and that many ethnicities and cultures exist which should be respected, and they see Orthodoxy as the only religion which acknowledges this, then who are we to say that they converted for the wrong reasons? There is no wrong reason to convert.

We are all called to evangelize to others, we cannot prefer people who have an "Orthodox" background or come from an "Orthodox" culture.
 
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orthobulgarian

Chicken
Orthodox
I don't see this from Roosh, Brother Augustine, Jay Dyer, PatriarchPrimus, Snek, DavidTheRealMedWhite, or any major figure in the Orthosphere. It's pretty insulting to insinuate someone hasn't had a "full conversion" without very concrete proof. If people have some of the truth through their political beliefs, and they recognize Orthodoxy is the only compatible religion with those beliefs, and then they convert, I don't think that is something to criticize them for. Once they make the decision to convert, there is a lot of catechism and working of The Holy Spirit which follows.

For example, someone could recognize that homosexuality is wrong in and of itself, and that many ethnicities and cultures exist which should be respected, and they see Orthodoxy as the only religion which acknowledges this, then who are we to say that the converted for the wrong reasons? There is no wrong reason to convert.

We are all called to Evangelize to others, we cannot prefer people who have an "Orthodox" background or come from an "Orthodox" culture.
I am not talking about mentioned people but rather about the people claiming to be Orthodox in internet. I saw them as stereotypical young, male, playing video games, patriotic, redpilled and so on. I am sorry but can’t write much details in this moment and promise to elaborate my point later.
 

Penitent

Robin
Orthodox
I imagine that the Orthosphere will reach those who need a "brash" or bold approach to get their attention. The internet is chaos, and perhaps Ortho content creators are cutting through that noise.

That said, as Orthodox we should never call people heretics or say they're going to hell. We should share our faith and answer questions in a loving, patient way.
There is a need for the type of content being created in the Orthosphere. The Orthodox Church is inherently a conservative institution, so it should be no surprise if some people will view our (hither-to) un-Orthodox means of evangelism with skepticism. This should give us motivation as content creators to be irreproachable in our behavior. As Patriarch Kyrill has said, if we fail to use the internet for the purpose of evangelism, then only the devil will use it.

I will refer to one principle that sometimes irks me in the Orthosphere, and that is the advice to "talk to the priest" at any given parish.
I share your sentiment. It is sort of a knee-jerk reaction to say "talk to a priest," and not always helpful. On the one hand the priest in question has the grace conferred in ordination to guide souls, and in general following the advice of a priest is a safe bet. But sometimes we can take this principle and go a bit too far with it, making our priests out to be unerring guides. In the Russian tradition only an Elder is considered to be an unerring guide and I don't know of any that are alive today.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Ostrich
Orthodox
I am not talking about mentioned people but rather about the people claiming to be Orthodox in internet. I saw them as stereotypical young, male, playing video games, patriotic, redpilled and so on. I am sorry but can’t write much details in this moment and promise to elaborate my point later.
The advice I was given as an inquirer was "completely avoid the Orthodox internet." I still follow that advice to this day, apart from this forum and the Orthosphere content creators (including priests and monks on YouTube and podcasts).
 

get2choppaaa

Ostrich
The advice I was given as an inquirer was "completely avoid the Orthodox internet." I still follow that advice to this day, apart from this forum and the Orthosphere content creators (including priests and monks on YouTube and podcasts).
Exact advice i was given by my Priest. Since most of the commentary comes from newly illuminated/catechumens. Once we had that discussion I realized it's not a good idea to present myself as though i speak for Orthodoxy when i am new to The Church. I think it's important to remember that as laymen we should be very hesitant to present our understanding as the official position of The Church. Im sure I've probably been guilty of it in the past. I keep on the forum for the same reason that there are good resources here but am hesitant to do much more than that after my conversations with my priest.
 

Basilus of Moro

Sparrow
Orthodox
I share your sentiment. It is sort of a knee-jerk reaction to say "talk to a priest," and not always helpful. On the one hand the priest in question has the grace conferred in ordination to guide souls, and in general following the advice of a priest is a safe bet. But sometimes we can take this principle and go a bit too far with it, making our priests out to be unerring guides. In the Russian tradition only an Elder is considered to be an unerring guide and I don't know of any that are alive today.

Yes, that's right. I confess I don't really believe that priests necessarily actualize the grace given in potency upon their ordination, and so many guide souls to very bad places, it seems. A priest at my former parish, for example, would permit married couples to engage in mortal sins, saying it was not his business - "what you do in your bedroom is no business of mine" kind of boomer thing. I doubt most priests are like that - thank God! - but many are, based on conversations with geographically distant friends in various jurisdictions.

It is very difficult to find unerring guides these days, although they do exist, but are usually not very well known on purpose.

There's some very good quotes from perhaps St. Theophan if memory serves on how to find a good spiritual father that has bearing on who we can trust. I'm sure you've seen it, but it may be worth posting for new converts to the faith. If I dig it up, I'll post it somewhere.
 

Penitent

Robin
Orthodox
The advice I was given as an inquirer was "completely avoid the Orthodox internet." I still follow that advice to this day, apart from this forum and the Orthosphere content creators (including priests and monks on YouTube and podcasts).
The advice I was given by my priest was similar: look to see if is says "with the blessing of [name of bishop/synod]." I believe the technical term is imprimatur. Wouldn't that be cool if this site had that posted on the header of the home page?
 

OrthoLeaf

Sparrow
Orthodox
Roosh and other Orthodox forum members,

How do you deal with the ethnic aspect of the Orthodox church? While I do have some Ukrainian blood, I am mostly of Germanic heritage. There's no Germanic Orthodox church that I know of. Is it strange to not be of the ethnicity of the Orthodox branch you've chosen? (If, of course, this applies to you).
By walking into the parish and joining them in worship. It's really just that simple. My parish is a heavy ethnic Russian community, but I was welcomed in with open arms. So far it has been completely immune to the spirit of our times and walking into the parish is like entering another world altogether. I actually feel more at home here, than I ever did in the OCA with their masks and disinfectant wipes - and this is in spite of no longer understanding 2/3rds of the Liturgy.
 

Penitent

Robin
Orthodox
Yes, that's right. I confess I don't really believe that priests necessarily actualize the grace given in potency upon their ordination, and so many guide souls to very bad places, it seems. A priest at my former parish, for example, would permit married couples to engage in mortal sins, saying it was not his business - "what you do in your bedroom is no business of mine" kind of boomer thing. I doubt most priests are like that - thank God! - but many are, based on conversations with geographically distant friends in various jurisdictions.

It is very difficult to find unerring guides these days, although they do exist, but are usually not very well known on purpose.

There's some very good quotes from perhaps St. Theophan if memory serves on how to find a good spiritual father that has bearing on who we can trust. I'm sure you've seen it, but it may be worth posting for new converts to the faith. If I dig it up, I'll post it somewhere.
I'm not sure who this quote is attributed to but it is one that applies to me:
"He who gives himself spiritual guidance has a fool for a spiritual father."
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
Roosh and other Orthodox forum members,

How do you deal with the ethnic aspect of the Orthodox church? While I do have some Ukrainian blood, I am mostly of Germanic heritage. There's no Germanic Orthodox church that I know of. Is it strange to not be of the ethnicity of the Orthodox branch you've chosen? (If, of course, this applies to you).
I’m Indian, and have been openly welcomed in ethnic Serbian and Russian churches, while Antiochian parishes have been unfriendly. It really depends on the parish: there’s no hard rule here.
 
By walking into the parish and joining them in worship. It's really just that simple. My parish is a heavy ethnic Russian community, but I was welcomed in with open arms. So far it has been completely immune to the spirit of our times and walking into the parish is like entering another world altogether. I actually feel more at home here, than I ever did in the OCA with their masks and disinfectant wipes - and this is in spite of no longer understanding 2/3rds of the Liturgy.

The more visible the church is the more it is targeted for subversion. So the Catholic and Protestant Churches have got the greatest helping of that operation.

Russian Orthodox isn't so visible and prominent to be a target yet by comparison.
 

Liviu

Sparrow
Orthodox
Are you telling me the Catholic church is orthodox? And the Orthodox church is catholic? What about us orthodox, catholic, Protestant Christians? :laughter:
Catholic Church is neither orthodox (because `orthodoxia` in Greek means `right worshipping`) nor Catholic (`catholic` in Greek means `universal`). In the Vth century in the Church was the pentarchy : Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem. Rome introduced innovations in faith starting with the IXth century and in 1054 separated itself from the Eastern patriarchates of former pentarchy, which still are in communion. So, One True Church (The Orthodox Church) is also `orthodox` and `catholic`. The so called Catholic Church is only Church of Rome.

Another example of theft of name is the name of the Roman Empire. The westerns called the Roman Empire which remained in East with the capital at Constantinople, Byzantine Empire, gelous on their true continuity of former Roman Empire with the capital at Rome. But the official name of the empire wasn`t Byzantine Empire,was Roman Empire. In the same time the German Empire from about the time of the schism, with the blessing of the pope of the time took the name the Holy Roman Empire with the attempt to stress that the `orthodox` faith is at Rome not at Constantinople. But you can`t impose the truth through words. True faith is shown more by facts than by words.
 
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