The Soccer Thread

Rocha

Ostrich
Gold Member
Labienus said:
Joao Felix looks like the next big thing. He's been incredible so far with Atletico.
Major flop...total waste of money.

Jorge Mendes can sell even his mother to a big club...
 

Labienus

Woodpecker
Rocha said:
Labienus said:
Joao Felix looks like the next big thing. He's been incredible so far with Atletico.
Major flop...total waste of money.

Jorge Mendes can sell even his mother to a big club...
He's been poor since my comment.

I still think he'll be a great player.

The other major young talent to watch is Kai Havertz at Bayer Leverkusen. That guy has everything.
 
Politics aside , I am always happy when I see a new nation entering the final phase of a major continental (or World) competition.
It seems that through the playoffs of Nations League group D we will have a new team in the now 24-teams competition for the Euro2020. Either North Macedonia , Kosovo or Georgia.

Through the normal qualifying groups , we probably will see Finland as a new nation. Unless mistaken they have never made it to a big competition.
 

John Silva

Sparrow
I also like to see a new nation in a final phase, but with 24 teams in the Euro and the 48 in the World Cup (after Qatar) it's not the same thing as before. In the Euro roughly half of the UEFA members(55) will qualify. I mean it's just not as epic as before. They're going to kill what was special about these competitions with these moronic enlargements.
 

Serie A

Pigeon
Polniy_Sostav said:
Politics aside , I am always happy when I see a new nation entering the final phase of a major continental (or World) competition.
It seems that through the playoffs of Nations League group D we will have a new team in the now 24-teams competition for the Euro2020. Either North Macedonia , Kosovo or Georgia.

Through the normal qualifying groups , we probably will see Finland as a new nation. Unless mistaken they have never made it to a big competition.
Pandev, Alioski, Ademi and Elmas deserve to grace the finals of a major tournament. Wonderful players.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
The last group in the upcoming Euro includes France, Germany and Portugal, the winners of the last 2 world cups and the last Euro and Euro Nations tournament. I can't recall a more deadly "group of death", ever!
 
John Silva said:
I also like to see a new nation in a final phase, but with 24 teams in the Euro and the 48 in the World Cup (after Qatar) it's not the same thing as before. In the Euro roughly half of the UEFA members(55) will qualify. I mean it's just not as epic as before. They're going to kill what was special about these competitions with these moronic enlargements.
The formula with so many host stadiums is just a joke. All this to make us believe that Europe is united whole it s obviously not. The only way to unite Europe would be under the banner of Christianity . But it s exactly the contrary that they are trying to push : the motto of the EU is "United in diversity".
Having said that they have so many matches impossible to make such as Kosovo v Serbia ; Azerbaijan v Armenia ; Ukraine v Russia etc ...

The problem is not enlargement per se ; I think the competitions could be 3 weeks longer and everyone would take place - I don't see why San Marino shouldn't play the Euro - but in this case qualifiers and nations league and friendlies should be banned .
 

Serie A

Pigeon
Polniy_Sostav said:
John Silva said:
I also like to see a new nation in a final phase, but with 24 teams in the Euro and the 48 in the World Cup (after Qatar) it's not the same thing as before. In the Euro roughly half of the UEFA members(55) will qualify. I mean it's just not as epic as before. They're going to kill what was special about these competitions with these moronic enlargements.
The formula with so many host stadiums is just a joke. All this to make us believe that Europe is united whole it s obviously not. The only way to unite Europe would be under the banner of Christianity . But it s exactly the contrary that they are trying to push : the motto of the EU is "United in diversity".
Having said that they have so many matches impossible to make such as Kosovo v Serbia ; Azerbaijan v Armenia ; Ukraine v Russia etc ...

The problem is not enlargement per se ; I think the competitions could be 3 weeks longer and everyone would take place - I don't see why San Marino shouldn't play the Euro - but in this case qualifiers and nations league and friendlies should be banned .
The present formula is actually not too bad. Europe has the greatest strength in depth of any continent when it comes to soccer, and a 24-team European Championship means that there is a healthy level of competition for qualification while still allowing some relative minnows the chance of qualifying (Albania in 2016, Macedonia and/or Kosovo in 2020).

The UEFA Nations League has been a surprising hit with fans, too. At first I thought it was too complicated to catch on, but attendances have been impressive.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Ibra's bicycle kick goal for Sweden is still the most amazing goal I've ever seen, looks just as amazing as it did the first time around.
 

open source

Sparrow
Gold Member
Top scorers of the decade



Golden boy nominees at the start of the decade



Most red cards of the decade



PL top scorers



Pl assists


Ballon d'or votes



Dailymail's team of the decade
- impossible to agree on all but this seems to be most agreed upon team by fans


Team of the decade by other magazines - image
 
'Shocked and disappointed': Judge dismisses USWNT's equal pay claim

A federal judge threw out the unequal pay claim by players on the US women’s national soccer team in a surprising loss for the defending World Cup champions but allowed their allegation of discriminatory working conditions to go to trial.

Players led by Alex Morgan sued in March 2019, claiming they have not been paid equally under their collective bargaining agreement to what the men’s national team receives under its labor deal. They asked for more than $66m in damages under the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

In a 32-page decision Friday, US district judge R Gary Klausner granted in part a motion for partial summary judgment by the US Soccer Federation. He threw out the Equal Pay Act allegations but left intact the Civil Rights Act claims.

“The history of negotiations between the parties demonstrates that the WNT rejected an offer to be paid under the same pay-to-play structure as the MNT, and the WNT was willing to forgo higher bonuses for benefits, such as greater base compensation and the guarantee of a higher number of contracted players,” Klausner wrote.

“Accordingly, plaintiffs cannot now retroactively deem their CBA worse than the MNT CBA by reference to what they would have made had they been paid under the MNT’s pay-to-play terms structure when they themselves rejected such a structure,” he said.

Klausner left intact claims the USSF discriminated in the money it spent on commercial airfare, hotel accommodations, and medical and training support services.

A trial is scheduled for 16 June in federal court in Los Angeles.

“We are shocked and disappointed with today’s decision, but we will not give up our hard work for equal pay,” Molly Levinson, spokeswoman for the women’s players, said in a statement. “We are confident in our case and steadfast in our commitment to ensuring that girls and women who play this sport will not be valued as lesser just because of their gender.”

Players intend to ask the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals to overturn Klausner’s decision, a move that could delay the trial into 2021 or later.

“If you know this team at all you know we have a lot of fight left in us. We knew this wasn’t going to be easy, change never is,” defender Becky Sauerbrunn wrote on Twitter.


While the Americans are the most successful women’s team, with four World Cup titles including the last two, the US men did not even qualify for the 2018 World Cup. The USSF argued the women actually made more than the men both overall and by game average, and the women claimed they should have the same bonus structure as the men.

“Merely comparing what WNT players received under their own CBA with what they would have received under the MNT CBA discounts the value that the team placed on guaranteed benefits they receive under their agreement, which they opted for at the expense of higher performance-based bonuses,” Klausner wrote.

“This issue is insufficient to create a genuine issue of material fact for trial,” he added.

Klausner also said the women could not go forward with their claim that the USSF discriminated against them by scheduling more games on artificial turf than the men had. He said there was not sufficient evidence to show that decisions on field surface were made for discriminatory reasons.

He rejected the USSF’s argument that the men had a competitive need for charter flights that the women lacked, allowing that part of the suit to go forward. The federation has argued that the men, who have struggled in World Cup qualifying, have more need for charters than the women in order to arrive more rested for their qualifiers.

“This rationale does not fully explain the gross disparity on money spent on airfare and hotels for the teams,” Klausner wrote.

In addition, the USSF has said spending in these areas has been equal since the women’s union agreed to a new labor deal in 2017.

Klausner allowed other claims of discriminatory travel accommodations, such as money spent on hotels and commercial flights, to go to trial along with claims on support services such as medical and training staff. He said the USSF’s lawyers waited until reply briefs to ask for those claims to be thrown out, which meant he did not have to consider them.

Seyfarth Shaw’s summary judgment motion for the USSF included arguments critical of American women’s players. That filing caused an uproar and led to the resignation of USSF president Carlos Cordeiro, who was replaced by Cindy Parlow Cone, a former national team player. Latham & Watkins took over as counsel and filed the reply brief.

Parlow Cone has said she hopes the suit can settle before a trial.

“We look forward to working with the women’s national team to chart a positive path forward to grow the game,” the USSF said in a statement. “We are committed to continuing that work to ensure our women’s national team remains the best in the world.”

Earlier Friday, the women asked that Parlow Cone be included as a trial witness. Their lawyers said although the federation backed off earlier arguments saying women were inferior to their male counterparts in skill and effort, it still planned to contest differences in responsibility.
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