The Sopranos Discussion/Appreciation Thread

SiverFox

Robin
Talking Sopranos
Sopranos co-stars Michael Imperioli and Steve Schirripa host the definitive Sopranos re-watch podcast. Michael and Steve follow the Sopranos series episode by episode giving fans all the inside info, behind the scenes stories and little-known facts that could only come from someone on the inside. Talking Sopranos also features interviews with additional cast members, producers, writers, production crew and special guests. Along with talking about the Sopranos, Michael and Steve will also share candid conversations about the entertainment business, their friendship and all the folks they’ve met along the way. This is a must listen for all Sopranos fans.

https://talkingsopranos.simplecast.com/
 
I only just finished watching this series for the first time. I didn't buy the hype when it came out but now I see it was well deserved.

All the characters were so well written and acted. I just binged the series from start to finish so I know now I'll spend a while ruminating on it. I can't say much that hasn't been written in these pages, but I will reiterate what some others have said: I'm glad I watched it now and not 15 years ago, with what I have learned about human (and particularly female) nature in that time.

Also, for the record: I don't think Tony gets whacked in that final blackout. I do think we are left with the idea that it will happen sooner or later (maybe sooner) and that he will forever be looking over his shoulder, never knowing when it is coming.
 
I'm glad this thread got revived; quite appropriate for a timeless great which is relevant to men. Also I've been watching and rewatching to get into the nuances of their conversations. It's treasure to an overanalyzing type like me.

That said I'm impatiently waiting for the prequel movie. I'm wary how it will go as it's amid the 70's race riots. Will we see Dickie Moltisanti or young Tony being proto SJW's? I'm revving to see how much Chase gets away with his realism this time.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Kingfisher
For anyone wondering, DO NOT waste your time watching Many Saints.

It's just a series of bad SNL sketches based on a great tv show, with some scenes from Shaft interspersed in.

It's a shame they besmirched a piece of epic Americana with this steaming pile of waste.
I'm disappointed in the reception but that is to be expected as that was how people were with the original show. I thought the movie was great. The acting was fantastic. The music was great. As for the "bad SNL" sketches, it has the same episodic DNA as the show. The themes of determinism over free will using Oedipus Rex in a metaphor flew over most people's heads for the show and not much has changed 14 years on.

Anyway, he never had the makings of a varsity athlete.
 
Last edited:
I'm disappointed in the reception but that is to be expected as that was how people were with the original show. I thought the movie was great. The acting was fantastic. The music was great. As for the "bad SNL" sketches, it has the same episodic DNA as the show. The themes of determinism over free will using Oedipus Rex in a metaphor flew over most people's heads for the show and not much has changed 14 years on.

Anyway, he never had the makings of a varsity athlete.

You're disappointed that people feel rightfully repulsed at this disjointed mess of a film? Some of the acting was fine, the rest was camp impressions.

Yeah, the dumb audience missed all the Freudianism and Oedipal references... I mean, the main character only killed his father something like 20 min into the movie so he could sleep with his mother, and Tony's mom was made up with prosthetics to look like his WIFE on the show. It was really really subtle, and only you appreciated it, lol.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Kingfisher
You're disappointed that people feel rightfully repulsed at this disjointed mess of a film? Some of the acting was fine, the rest was camp impressions.
I'm disappointed that people are slow to appreciate the art. If you were there for the original shows finale, you might recall that it was polarizing but 14 years on its heralded as one of the most unique and mysterious television finales ever. I suspect the same will remain true for this movie, especially for those who have watched it more than once (I've already watched it 5 times to see what I missed).

Yeah, the dumb audience missed all the Freudianism and Oedipal references... I mean, the main character only killed his father something like 20 min into the movie so he could sleep with his mother, and Tony's mom was made up with prosthetics to look like his WIFE on the show.
Not calling the audience dumb. I'm sympathetic as to why most would feel the way they do as David Chase is infamous for intentionally frustrating his audience by subverting their expectations and using roundabout symbolism to carry thematic elements. I would encourage the audience to watch it more than once before they come to a hasty conclusion and I would encourage them to do the same with the original show as well. But if the Sopranos is not for them then it's not for them.

There's also more to it than just those examples but good catch.

It was really really subtle, and only you appreciated it, lol.
I think this snark is beneath you. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 
Last edited:
I think if something like the Sopranos was written and directed by a real Neapolitan implant, there would be much less (((psychobabble))) and much more accurate portrayals (though often mundane, their lives weren't really that interesting other than the high of certain crimes) of wiseguys and their daily doings. For interesting crime that really spikes the adrenaline, you're going to have to look outside the syndicate types. The most real character on that show was the guy Phil played by Frank Vincent, who rightly called Tony's crew "this pigmy thing over in Jersey," something the show never really focused on was how the commission operated across the country. Individual episodes by themselves were great, like the pilot episode, the college one where Tony finds the rat in hiding, when Tony and Paulie go to Italy and do business with the Rome syndicate, and some of the episodes in the final season, but altogether its just not realistic like Michael Franzese describes. James Gandolfini played a better mobster in his three scenes in True Romance than he did in this entire show.

The Many Saints of Newark missed the mark, they could have done great, but then when you look at the source material, it had jew written all over it then, and this has jew written all over it now.
 
Top