The Tennis Thread

Freebird Flying

Woodpecker
I learned tennis mid 30 s just a few years ago and I wanted to take the opportunity to learn the game properly, so I hired the best coach in my city that I could find. I bought a ball machine to practice on after the lessons. Then, I signed up for tennis clinics, league play and a meetup group.

I got absolutely killed playing 3.0. as that was the lowest level but most of the guys had been playing for a couple of years. I found that playing in the meetup groups or drop in clinics to have a more chill and fun vibe, plus I didn't have to be on a schedule and was able to play against different players of various skill levels. It took me a couple of years to where I could compete well enough to compete with the guys who were good in high school.

I really enjoyed the process of learning something and having so much fun playing, I really love tennis. I stoppped playing for around 2 years and just getting back into the sport, and it really is a great and fun sport to play and even watch.

I actually took the opportunity to use tennis as an excuse to do some traveling. I attended all 4 major tennis Tourneys my 2nd year playing. I watched the French Open, Wimbledon, U.S. Open, and Australia. Fun travels.

I've seen guys get really good in a year that played a lot. I think it depends on your personality if you want to be self taught and get great form then definitely find a top tier coach and get lessons early so you don't develop bad habits. If you just want to do it your way then it's ok also. But I think when you play on your own before taking the lessons you will likely develop bad habits so it's likely best to take the lessons right off IMO.

I'm looking forward to the Australia event in January I plan to go. I'm really hoping Federer and Jochavich can get matched up at the Final or Semifinal.

I learned the one handed backhand. that's a very tricky shot to get consistent at. Also, I like watching the players with the one handed backhands play the best. The kick server is a fun shot also. I also love going for a very hard return serveI remember at the meetup group I was trying to kill the serves from all of the players for a few sessions and after studying some vidoes on youtube and being persistent at it, I was getting dialed in and my return serve became pretty dangerous at times :)

. If you get a chance to read Open by Aggassi, it's a great read. I loved that book.

Tennis is Fun!

Cheers!
 

Built to Fade

Woodpecker
Tennis Learning Datasheet (Introduction)

TigerMandingo said:
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How long have you been playing?
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Tips on how to get better?
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I'll add some tennis learning information here for anyone that plays tennis or are looking to try tennis for the first time. I'm an experienced player (10+ years experience) & here are three of the most important things I've learned throughout my tennis journey:

1. Having a clear intention [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tW8Yh3hVG08][size=xx-small][1], [2][/url][/size]

Having a clear intention is one of the most important skills to have in tennis. This would be one of the deal-breakers for anyone learning to play. It is the ability to know in advance which shot you want to hit (topspin/back spin, forehand/backhand, groundstroke/drop shot, flat/slice/kick serve, power/block/drop volley or overhead smash), the ball trajectory (direction/height/depth/spin/speed) & why you want to hit this particular shot. If you only learn one thing from tennis, always remember this.

You may have seen a tennis player with poor technique defeat someone who seems to have a "superior" power game (big serve/forehand, spin spin spin, penetrating shots, very aggressive playing style) & you wonder to yourself:
How could that player just only flick their racquet to hit lots of strange shots, yet manage to frustrate their opponent at the same time?

The answer is that the player with "poor technique" possess a much clearer intention to hit a tennis ball anywhere they want on the court than their opponent can. They would know in advance where they'll want to hit the next shot before their "power hitter" opponent has even swung their racquet forward to hit the ball.

Then, guess what happens to that power hitter? Either they'll hit harder closer to the lines (Dominic Thiem says hi) or start playing passive tennis. Since the "power hitter's" intentions become unclear and are becoming increasingly frustrated, the set will be over quickly in favour of the player with "poor technique".

Developing a clear intention during play only comes with the experience of hitting a tennis ball at least thousands of times in thousands of different ways. Having a clear intention will minimise your negative emotions because you are focused on hitting a good shot. This brings up the second point.

2. Focus on hitting a "good shot", a type of process oriented goal setting.

A "good shot" would be any racquet movement your body uses to hit the ball that can generate effortless power with minimal effort and is repeatable. This extends from the first point about having a clear intention. This would be of heightened emphasis for the serve, since that's the only tennis shot where you have full control of the shot. The fundamental movements for each stroke are:

Volley - "High Five" or "Punch"
Fore/Back hand - Underarm Throw, Side Throw & Backhand Throw (for one handed backhand)
Serve - Overarm Throw


Developing a clear intention will take 6-12 months of intensive training (10+ hours a week) or a few years playing casually to be competent at this skill. Multiply by 100-1000x (this may still be generous) and it would be an approximation of an elite tennis player's proficiency.

3. Accepting mistakes. This can also apply to other areas of your life.

Lastly, this is the most important concept to understand and it links back to your intent. From my experience, I will always make a mistake in every point I play. The mistake could be technical (racquet swung differently than I wanted), tactical (trying a cheeky "tweener" instead of a regular forehand (Hi Nick :banana:)) or physical (reacted too late or not enough hip & leg drive or poor footwork). On average, I made a mistake every 20-30 seconds and for less experienced players, this would occur more frequently. As this is one of the deal-breakers when learning to play, it is important to understand that mistakes will happen and you'll need to know why this mistake occurred. This would require a clear intent (refer to point #1) to induce any improvements moving forward.

TL;DR:
1. "Clear Eyes, Full Hearts, Can't Lose."
2. Roger Federer
3. What [not?] to do when a mistake occurs (video below, scroll to 0:27): :laugh::laugh::laugh:
Look before you smash the ball in frustration or even better, don't hit that ball at all (Denis Shapovalov learned the hard way & it may have helped him become more focused):


If you learned a lot from this and improved your tennis game, you may be able to teach tennis to some eager tennis players.
tenue-tennis-femme.jpg
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[img=640x800]https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/2...ry_Suspension-Short_Black_FT3-4_Web.jpg[/img]

References:
[1] - The Most Important Element Of Tennis For Consistency (by Tomaz Mencinger)
[2] - #1 Thing In Tennis You Must Never Forget: Intention (by Tomaz Mencinger)

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"Game, set and match." #160
 

Built to Fade

Woodpecker
Novak Djokovic has taken the Year-End No. 1 for 2018. Congrats Novak.

Has Novak regained his "Super Alpha mode"? Only time will tell. It's Novak's 2019 for the taking.

This is what I meant when I said that Novak has a 99.99999999999999999999999% chance to win his 15th Grand Slam at the Novak Djokovic Australian Open.
Here's a couple of articles highlighting Novak's great 2018 comeback run:
  1. Where does Djokovic’s comeback rate among best ever? | Original Article: Where does Djokovic’s comeback rate among best ever?
    c485f00258538e5f0699c2fb6323bbd8f49293ae.jpg

    Novak Djokovic regained the world No. 1 ranking on Monday, having climbed from outside the top 20 at the start of the year.

    And the worrying thing for his opponents? He might have only just got started.

    Djokovic’s climb back to No. 1 has taken in two Grand Slam titles and a 47-10 win record, leading to a total improvement in his Elo rating* from the start of the year of +265.

    NEWS: Nishikori beats erratic Federer in London

    Elo ratings are an alternative to more traditional rankings aimed at giving a greater insight into a player’s performance ability.

    As impressive as that ratings climb is, it isn’t unprecedented, especially when you consider players who are just coming onto the scene and have the most room to improve over a short period of time.


    [Read full article for ELO ratings & explanation]
  2. Why Novak Djokovic Is Playing Scary Tennis Right Now... | Original Article: Why Novak Djokovic Is Playing Scary Tennis Right Now...
    _______________________________________________
    Serb's dazzling serving numbers have underpinned his second-half surge in 2018 and make him the man to beat at the Nitto ATP Finals
    _______________________________________________

    What happens when the game’s best returner suddenly becomes one of the best players at holding serve? Things get scary. Quickly!

    Since Wimbledon, Novak Djokovic has been holding serve more than 9 out of 10 times. He continues to break serve almost once every three times. Any mathematician will tell you those are winning numbers.

    Having started the year with a 6-6 match record, Djokovic has completed the greatest in-season turnaround by a player to finish the season World No. 1 in ATP Rankings history (since 1973).

    Brad Gilbert, the former World No. 4, leading coach and now insightful commentator, traces Djokovic’s resurgence to his epic semi-final win over Nadal at Wimbledon. And, in particular, the Serb’s serving performance that day.

    “I thought that was his best-serving match in a long time and that match was the impetus to where he is now. His serve has been the huge difference in his game as he’s gone on this run,” Gilbert says. “He’s not serving massively bigger but, like Rafa, he’s a good spot server who hits the corners. He's hitting service winners and winning a higher percentage of first-serve points.”

    Prior to Wimbledon, Djokovic was winning 84.4 percent of service games in 2018. But since Wimbledon the Serb had held serve 90.9 percent of the time leading into Nitto ATP Finals. On a full-season basis, only five players have held serve at 90 percent or better in 2018: John Isner, Ivo Karlovic, Roger Federer, Milos Raonic and Nick Kyrgios. (It must be noted that those marks include the clay season, during which it can be tougher to hold serve. Djokovic’s 90.9 percentage rate has been achieved on grass and hard.)
    _______________________________________________
    You May Also Like: Read & Watch: Djokovic Presented Year-End ATP World Tour No. 1 Trophy
    _______________________________________________

    Caveats aside, Djokovic’s serving numbers underpinned his remarkable 31-1 record from the start of Wimbledon up to his loss in the final of the Rolex Paris Masters to Karen Khachanov. Gilbert believes that the Serb’s second-half run will continue, if not accelerate, in 2019.

    “I think he's about to dominate,” Gilbert says. “The freight train has started and it’s full steam ahead.”

    Gilbert was coaching Andre Agassi in 1999 when the American worked his way back from a low of No. 14 in May to win two majors [Roland Garros and the US Open] and finish on top of the ATP Rankings. Prior to this year, that same-season comeback was the biggest by a year-end No. 1.

    “Novak’s Wimbledon breakthrough and his 31-2 [match record] turnaround totally reminds me of what Andre did in '99 when he won the French, got to the final of Wimbledon and won the US Open. I think Novak is looking at a monster 2019. I could see him winning Australia and all of a sudden he's in play for his second Djoker Slam.

    “He’s tying Federer and Connors with five year-end No. 1 finishes. Beating Sampras' six year-enders, finishing his career with 45 Masters 1000 titles… all these things are possible. But right now I'm sure he's just focussed on finishing the year strong and winning the Nitto ATP Finals.”

    Did You Know?
    Djokovic's 23 aces against Nadal in his five-set victory at Wimbledon this year were a career-high for the Serb.
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"Djokovic is the most complete player of all time. - Nick Bollettieri" #165
 

Freebird Flying

Woodpecker
Who's going to be in Melbourne for Aus. Open?

Hope I can see a Jochavich Federer Final. Roger is gonna crush his soul. Just want to see good match actually.

Big 4? I think it's just a big 3. Andy Murray has been long gone for some time now. He only has 3 titles, hardly worthy of being in the big 4.

As a side note - Has anyone recommendations on how to stream the games on demand internationally? I was trying to watch the French Open matches online but I can't find them. Live won't work. I don't have time to watch the whole match but if I can get on demand then I can watch that would be awesome!

Cheers!
 

godfather dust

Hummingbird
Gold Member
What surface do you guys prefer?

I haven't done grass, just cement and clay.

I like the clay if it has been maintained well, prefer the smaller bounce. Bad clay gives lots of bad bounces however.
 

Built to Fade

Woodpecker
godfather dust said:
What surface do you guys prefer?

I haven't done grass, just cement and clay.

I like the clay if it has been maintained well, prefer the smaller bounce. Bad clay gives lots of bad bounces however.

I've only played on hardcourt & synthetic grass/carpet. I'd like to play on clay one day as I generally hit with a lot of spin.

I don't recommend playing too much tennis on hardcourts since it's basically painted over concrete. Video related:
_______________________________________________

I've watched this Youtuber's (Andrew) tennis videos as it's always good to watch players closer to your own level. I think he's from eastern US. He did a match against a subscriber/fan some time ago.

Wearing blue shirt:

Having a hit with a nationally ranked female college prospect:

Andrew's most recent tennis video (wearing hat & yellow shirt):

My level is similar to his. The guy has good court coverage & consistency.
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"Swing high during the backswing, low to generate topspin potential, then high again during the contact & follow-through. It's kind of like a rollercoaster going down, then up." #173
 

Freebird Flying

Woodpecker
I'm willing to pay up to 200 dollars to get access to the major tennis tourneys on demand in a format like NBA and NFL league pass offer. No luck so far....

I need access to the matches without commercials, scores and I can watch at my convenience. Is that possible?
 
Disappointed Raonic is out, he seemed to be playing really good until his last match.

His net game has improved a lot but the last match he got lobbed a couple times.
 
I bought some new tennis shoes online the other day, they were on sale but the regular price was around $130USD so I assumed they'd be pretty decent. The thing is, I find them to be pretty uncomfortable, they are only second pair of tennis specific shoes, my first pair was some cheap $40 Nikes so I thought those shoes were just pieces of shit.

Are all tennis shoes this stiff and uncomfortable compared to running or training shoes?
 

Brosemite

Ostrich
Gold Member
Built to Fade said:
I've only played on hardcourt & synthetic grass/carpet. I'd like to play on clay one day as I generally hit with a lot of spin.

I don't recommend playing too much tennis on hardcourts since it's basically painted over concrete. Video related:

Yeah playing too much on hardcourts is the same reason why most NBA coaches don't want their guys playing on street courts during the offseason....too much wear & tear on the knees and the injuries on the surface can be the most devastating too.

I haven't played on clay before but only hardcourts and grass.

I think the hardest part about playing on grass is vertical up & down movement...maybe I was wearing awful shoes that day while on vacation in Asia. Horizontal movement is easy for me on grass as the surface tends to neutralize the heavy topspin and crazy kick serves.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
Sidney Crosby said:
I bought some new tennis shoes online the other day, they were on sale but the regular price was around $130USD so I assumed they'd be pretty decent. The thing is, I find them to be pretty uncomfortable, they are only second pair of tennis specific shoes, my first pair was some cheap $40 Nikes so I thought those shoes were just pieces of shit.

Are all tennis shoes this stiff and uncomfortable compared to running or training shoes?

Yes, as they have to maintain in a rigid way your foot and therefore ankle, as the game of tennis involves sharp torsion and sudden changes of directions.

dominic-thiem-sliding-on-clay.aspx


By the way, much respect to Built To fade, on his predicting Novak's victory at the AO'19: apparently, there is money to be made following his advice, for betting I mean!

https://www.rooshvforum.com/thread-56608-post-1885802.html#pid1885802
 

Brosemite

Ostrich
Gold Member
Sidney Crosby said:
I bought some new tennis shoes online the other day, they were on sale but the regular price was around $130USD so I assumed they'd be pretty decent. The thing is, I find them to be pretty uncomfortable, they are only second pair of tennis specific shoes, my first pair was some cheap $40 Nikes so I thought those shoes were just pieces of shit.

Are all tennis shoes this stiff and uncomfortable compared to running or training shoes?

Great points @Going Strong.

Also, I think tennis shoes are absolutely the BEST for cross training as well.

Whether it comes down to running sprints on say a tennis/indoor basketball court, weight lifting, or doing high intensity interval training, certain types of tennis shoes will provide you with more stability as they are constructed for sharp sudden twists & turns on an unforgiving surface being concrete!

Nike tennis court shoes tend to be overpriced & tear quite easily though they make the most comfortable distance running ones.

Adidas tennis court shoes tend to provide a nice balance of comfort & stability making it more effective than Nike.

The best tennis court shoes I've come across definitely have to be Asics. Most of these provide some form of a outer sole 6-12 month warranty as I use these shoes for my high intensity interval or overall athletic training. Have had my current pair since Fall 2014 as they're still working great past that warranty until now.

Another thing to keep in mind is to wear a half size or sometimes a full size smaller than your actual foot measurements for enhanced performance. This can even be true for dress shoes too as it'll fit your clothes better when going out.

Also, be sure to get low cut tennis shoes as it will increase your overall maneuverability & speed. For the money you pay, it'll also look more stylish than mid cut too.
 
Fucking Djokovic man.....snatching victory from the jaws of defeat like a boss. Fed looked devastated after the match lolz. On top of that, the crowd was working against Joker the entire time!

If he stays healthy he’ll surpass the GS record no doubt. What a champ.
 
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