The Three Basil Plants

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Originally posted on RooshV.com

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Since deciding in the summer of 2020 to become an Italian pizza master, I am in constant need of fresh basil since every pizza I make requires at least three or four fresh basil leaves. Instead of buying a package of basil every week, I maintain three basil plants at home. From taking care of them, I learned a lesson on how God treats us.

Walmart sells little plastic pots of basil for about the same price as a bunch. Rationally, I bought the pots so they can provide me a continual supply of basil at no extra cost for the rest of my life, but basil is a finicky plant. It hates to get its leaves too wet but at the same time needs a lot of water. The result is that I must check on my basil plants every day as if they were babies. I prune them regularly so dead or malformed leaves do not weigh the whole plant down. I lift up the pots often, rotating and examining them, measuring out water based on need. Where do the basil leaves put all that water that I give? I wonder.

When I bought the three plants, they were roughly equal in leaf density, but once in my care, one of the plants started to greatly lag behind the other two. Half of its stems died and the remaining ones produced tiny leaves that I couldn’t use in my pizzas. The plant had become worthless.

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As it was winter, sunlight into the house was limited. One spot by the window received the most amount of light. A second spot received slightly less and a third spot received the least. I put the struggling plant in the prime spot to get all the light. The other two plants, which were producing far more leaves, were placed in the spots that received less light. I wanted to give the lagging plant a chance to grow like the others.

The lagging plant refused to grow. The leaves remained small. The other two plants, I noticed, also stopped growing. The result of giving the slow plant favored treatment was that the two strongest plants began to starve. I could not tolerate this state of affairs. I moved the lagging plant to the back and allowed it to receive the least amount of light. I put the strongest plant in the prime spot. Its leaf density nearly doubled in only a week, giving me a bountiful crop for my pizzas. I had given the lagging plant a chance to produce, but it did not, and so it has remained an unproductive plant.

Now as they heard these things, [Jesus] spoke another parable, because He was near Jerusalem and because they thought the kingdom of God would appear immediately. Therefore He said: “A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom and to return. So he called ten of his servants, delivered to them ten minas, and said to them, ‘Do business till I come.’ But his citizens hated him, and sent a delegation after him, saying, ‘We will not have this man to reign over us.’

“And so it was that when he returned, having received the kingdom, he then commanded these servants, to whom he had given the money, to be called to him, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading. Then came the first, saying, ‘Master, your mina has earned ten minas.’ And he said to him, ‘Well done, good servant; because you were faithful in a very little, have authority over ten cities.’ And the second came, saying, ‘Master, your mina has earned five minas.’ Likewise he said to him, ‘You also be over five cities.’

“Then another came, saying, ‘Master, here is your mina, which I have kept put away in a handkerchief. For I feared you, because you are an austere man. You collect what you did not deposit, and reap what you did not sow.’ And he said to him, ‘Out of your own mouth I will judge you, you wicked servant. You knew that I was an austere man, collecting what I did not deposit and reaping what I did not sow. Why then did you not put my money in the bank, that at my coming I might have collected it with interest?’

“And he said to those who stood by, ‘Take the mina from him, and give it to him who has ten minas.’ (But they said to him, ‘Master, he has ten minas.’) ‘For I say to you, that to everyone who has will be given; and from him who does not have, even what he has will be taken away from him. But bring here those enemies of mine, who did not want me to reign over them, and slay them before me.’ ” —Luke 19:11-27
Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. Matthew 7:19

I did sympathize with the lagging plant, and gave it a chance underneath the full brightness of the sun, but it refused to grow while the other plants meekly begged for more sun to show me their full glory. As a pizzaiolo, I require basil leaves on schedule and without compromise, and so the basil that did not produce must be given much less even though I strongly desire it to give me a rich bounty. The strongest plant will get the prime spot of sun, and the middle plant, which I neither despise nor love, will get just enough to avoid the trash heap.

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One of my pizzas

I can’t help but wonder if God treats us in a similar way. He gives many chances for us to reach our full glory that comes only when we repent and commune with him, but how many people do you know, despite receiving many gifts, choose not to grow? We spiritually lag, and forsake the grace that he gives us to pursue the rewards of Satan while God’s faithful children prosper with fewer gifts by choosing to work with God. God moves the wicked servant to the back of the line and brings his bountiful servants forward for a full complement of grace, and those servants grow to amazing heights while their doomed peers are thrown into the fire.

Which plant am I? Am I the lagging plant that will be condemned, the middle plant that does just enough to get into Heaven, or the bountiful plant that pleases God the most with my spiritual production? I have been the lagging plant for many decades of my life and am deserving of not one further drop of water or ray of sun based on how I so ignorantly and persistently rebuked God, but God’s mercy is great, and I was not thrown into the fire. Today I serve God as the plant in the middle, and hope that I can grow higher to approach a morsel of the greatness of the saints that have come before me and given God such a bountiful crop.

Read Next: The Cardinal Outside Your Window
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messaggera

Kingfisher
Woman
Basil is great to cut and procreate in fresh water too.
Roots in a few days. Sometimes better than dealing with dirt issues. Best of luck.

Great parable!
 

Abdiel

Chicken
Orthodox
sorry you didn't like Pepe's when you were in town (I am okay with reviewers saying it is the best anywhere, it is for its history and is still delicious sometimes) but as a local I would go to 2-3 (primarily Modern) other apizzerias before I would step foot on Wooster Street


if you come back give Modern a try, guarantee you'll rent an apartment in the (Yale) graduate ghetto, get fat and pull your beard out listening to Yale theologians discuss their futures in Revelations five churches


also, the eagle family that hunts the Giant is currently five
 

TexasJenn

Woodpecker
Woman
Thanks to plenty of hot, sunny weather, we have a very long growing season in Texas. I've been enjoying a bounteous fresh herb garden for months now, using many fresh herbs in my cooking. The basil plant in the yard is 3 feet tall and bushy with plenty of leaves. I keep it pretty well pruned, but this thread inspired me to give it some extra attention today.
 

Abdiel

Chicken
Orthodox
how do I change my chicken to a rooster?

doubt I can link to youtube, but from there, I offer you .... /watch?v=fQZ1Ao2yK5A
 
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ephriam

Chicken
Orthodox
Don't know what your situation is w/r/t space but I *highly* recommend this thing:


It attaches to most any Camp Chef pellet grill (smoker) and the combo of the two is unstoppable. Smoke your meat, vegetables etc on one side, make pizza on the other. There are also other attachments. Check them out - https://www.campchef.com/shop

Best pellet grill out there based on my experience and the pizza oven is fabulous.
 

Philonous

Sparrow
So, the artist reveals his craft. This, to relative newcomers such as myself (I take it more seasoned forum members already knew about your culinary/gardening pursuits).

My mother was a home economics teacher for 30 years, with “food chemistry” being part of her master’s degree. However, her cooking was simply not great—not ever. It was the cooking of a woman trained in sciences, trained in the WWII era about how to create large volumes of foods for institutions and industry.

“This has nutritional value”—God, did I hate hearing those words. It generally meant some flavorless, textureless quiche full of spinach, boiled meats and fish devoid of seasoning. Her granola Christmas cookies were like ground-up bits of cardboard baked in molasses—none of the other kids at school liked them. Nonetheless, she could describe the process from start to finish of how any known confectionary is produced.

In training women in the sciences, American colleges had taken everything out of what makes the woman’s approach to foods and aesthetics innately female (at least they didn’t alter her ability to sew things).

I have no innate ability at cooking myself—and no love of growing any sort of plant, either. Never took a single chemistry course in my life (I did audit one at one time—then noticed I was failing all the practice lessons, so there was no point in taking it for real).

I do know that for my own craft—oil painting—that “linseed oil” comes from the flax plant, and it was flax—rather than cotton—from which Europeans made their clothes and ship sails for centuries (made them out of linen—along with some use of hemp and Indian cotton; the Vikings used wood for their sailcloth).

That, and linseed oil has almost no smell—if you buy old oil paints on eBay and they have an odor, that’s the pigment—not the oil medium.

Any visual fine art that goes beyond the merely decorative is generally about 2 things:

1.) Crafting inspired images that herald one’s religion or civil society (even both at the same time);

2.) Dazzling the human psyche with brilliant colors tastefully arranged (although merely decorative art also serves this purpose).

And so, as you create the stuff more and more often, you start to become an “art nerd”. Learn what “Scheveningen warm grey” looks like. Learn the different sizes/shapes of brushes, as well as which company(s) makes good ones in enduring synthetic sable. Learn how much quality materials cost (a fortune), and how to care for them.

And does artistic talent translate into carpentry skill?

No. Not necessarily.

A carpenter has to know trees—know woods, and structural strengths. With that as a given, he has to be able to able to envision a piece of furnishing or architecture in x, y, and z dimensions—then know how to cut and fasten all the difference pieces without damaging any (or damaging a bare minimum).

I’m in my 50’s and I’ve never been able to do that with any finesse. So I’m probably never going to be able to do it. I will always damage lumber. I will always get measurements slightly off. I will always overbuild and break things, and without the hand of God my repairs will always look ugly.
 

roll the stone

Chicken
Woman
There seems to be all kinds of lessons in gardening. I look at my fruit trees, corn, watermelon, etc and think they are wonderful and so glad I planted them even though its been lots of prep work and maintenance --- I was thinking of this in relation to my sons friend who used to stay at our house ALOT. He had no mom and a lame dad & his behavior often showed it. I had many reasons to not want him here but I felt like God was telling me to keep "working" -- well the boy is still no saint but he is improving and getting closer to the Lord. I pray I never pass on one of HIS assignments because that's where the joy and lasting rewards are at.
 

tinana

Chicken
Woman
Love the analogy. There's also the environment the 3rd basil is in... you've changed the light and the water, what about the soil? One of my basil plants slowly withered and I realise it was because the soil was too alkaline.

It's possible that moving the plant to a less toxic environment will allow it to absorb the nutrients it needs.
 

Ah_Tibor

Kingfisher
Woman
Orthodox
So, the artist reveals his craft. This, to relative newcomers such as myself (I take it more seasoned forum members already knew about your culinary/gardening pursuits).

My mother was a home economics teacher for 30 years, with “food chemistry” being part of her master’s degree. However, her cooking was simply not great—not ever. It was the cooking of a woman trained in sciences, trained in the WWII era about how to create large volumes of foods for institutions and industry.

“This has nutritional value”—God, did I hate hearing those words. It generally meant some flavorless, textureless quiche full of spinach, boiled meats and fish devoid of seasoning. Her granola Christmas cookies were like ground-up bits of cardboard baked in molasses—none of the other kids at school liked them. Nonetheless, she could describe the process from start to finish of how any known confectionary is produced.

In training women in the sciences, American colleges had taken everything out of what makes the woman’s approach to foods and aesthetics innately female (at least they didn’t alter her ability to sew things).


This is a good read on that topic! Short version: as things became more methodical/progressive/science! women weren't part of that, so they turned the domestic arts into a science to compete.
 

_io

Chicken
Woman
I have been feeling uncomfortable about this scripture lately, but your take on this analogy has convicted me. I already knew I was not flourishing, but your story really hit me hard. Thank you.
 
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