Thoughts about Higher Rate of Dementia in Women

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Let me try something scientific.

Hypercalcemia and/or Hyperparathyroidism.

This disease is often misdiagnosed, and is much more prevalent in women than in men and it more prevalent in senior women (who live longer than men). Hypercalcemia left for a long time essentially destroys the neurons in your brain and leads to dementia, a precursor to is is also osteoperosis as your body draws calcium out of your bones to keep blood calcium levels way too high. Hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism is also a disease which mainly has a post menopausal onset. As an old woman's hormones get messed up, so does the hormones that control blood calcium.

So, my guess is that dementia is more common in women because they are more common to have hormone and brain chemistry problems post menopause. Dementia is also more common in women because they make to old age and don't succumb to more male likely diseases from working outside the home in a higher stress or toxic environment like coronary disease or cancer.

So....its because they are women? Women lead less dangerous lives, but have more post hormonal impacts on their senior years. These post hormonal changes severely impact their body's regulatory and nervous systems, which leads to electrolyte imbalances like hypercalcemia, which leads to dementia, osteoperosis, metabolic and kidney disease. However, I think we'll definitely see dementia continue to rise as women become single smart phone addicts, and so develop feeble brains (but so will men) and a lifetime of birth control hormones (though I'd expect that is going to be seen more in incidence of breast and reproductive system cancers)
 
Is this in any given age group? If not it is maybe because men died before they had the chance to get dementia. As we know women get a few years older than men.
At least someone's not bringing religion into it. I don't know. I'm presuming that when they say women are twice as likely to get this disease, that they mean irrespective of life expectancy. It wouldn't be enough to explain the far higher occurance in women anyway.
 

estraudi

Pelican
Gold Member
Let me try something scientific.

Hypercalcemia and/or Hyperparathyroidism.

This disease is often misdiagnosed, and is much more prevalent in women than in men and it more prevalent in senior women (who live longer than men). Hypercalcemia left for a long time essentially destroys the neurons in your brain and leads to dementia, a precursor to is is also osteoperosis as your body draws calcium out of your bones to keep blood calcium levels way too high. Hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism is also a disease which mainly has a post menopausal onset. As an old woman's hormones get messed up, so does the hormones that control blood calcium.

So, my guess is that dementia is more common in women because they are more common to have hormone and brain chemistry problems post menopause. Dementia is also more common in women because they make to old age and don't succumb to more male likely diseases from working outside the home in a higher stress or toxic environment like coronary disease or cancer.

So....its because they are women? Women lead less dangerous lives, but have more post hormonal impacts on their senior years. These post hormonal changes severely impact their body's regulatory and nervous systems, which leads to electrolyte imbalances like hypercalcemia, which leads to dementia, osteoperosis, metabolic and kidney disease. However, I think we'll definitely see dementia continue to rise as women become single smart phone addicts, and so develop feeble brains (but so will men) and a lifetime of birth control hormones (though I'd expect that is going to be seen more in incidence of breast and reproductive system cancers)

Thanks for your input Doc. My mother was just diagnosed with osteoporosis in her spine as well as arthritis/ osteoporosis in her right hip.
She's been having back problems for a few years and now it's coming full circle that, as a postmenopausal woman, she is starting to experience the symptoms that would lead directly to dementia, just as you described. Couple this with her old beliefs (she's very conservative 59yr old) that women don't exercise, don't need to correct bad posture, sedentary life and general shit hispanic food diet she is not looking to be blessed with much health & vitality from here on out.
Worst part is she keeps thinking that somehow a doctor will fix her. I cannot explain enough that the doc is maybe 2% of the effort needed and the other 98% needs to come from her in order to be on the road to being a healthy sexagenarian.
Feels bad. I'm going to start some research into this hypercalcemia you mentioned. First time ever hearing that word.
Thanks.
 

Dr. Howard

Peacock
Gold Member
Thanks for your input Doc. My mother was just diagnosed with osteoporosis in her spine as well as arthritis/ osteoporosis in her right hip.
She's been having back problems for a few years and now it's coming full circle that, as a postmenopausal woman, she is starting to experience the symptoms that would lead directly to dementia, just as you described. Couple this with her old beliefs (she's very conservative 59yr old) that women don't exercise, don't need to correct bad posture, sedentary life and general shit hispanic food diet she is not looking to be blessed with much health & vitality from here on out.
Worst part is she keeps thinking that somehow a doctor will fix her. I cannot explain enough that the doc is maybe 2% of the effort needed and the other 98% needs to come from her in order to be on the road to being a healthy sexagenarian.
Feels bad. I'm going to start some research into this hypercalcemia you mentioned. First time ever hearing that word.
Thanks.

sending you a PM or whatever the new forum version is.
 
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