To carry a gun or not?

FrancisK

Pelican
Catholic
Gold Member
Thanks for the input everyone it is very valuable and I appreciate it all, I would like to reply to each one of you individually to comment and thank you but I don't want to clutter the thread with random chat.




I guess now the last issue would be the technical one, is it worth having my fingerprints on file to carry a gun?
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
The casing story sounds a bit like a
Thanks for the input everyone it is very valuable and I appreciate it all, I would like to reply to each one of you individually to comment and thank you but I don't want to clutter the thread with random chat.




I guess now the last issue would be the technical one, is it worth having my fingerprints on file to carry a gun?
Yes.

They've already got everything on you they need.

I wouldnt let the small hypothetical of them having your fingerprint and doing something be the thing that dissuaded you.

Edited to add: I reread the last couple pages... I really encourage everyone to look into the laws of their state. Some of the comments are not correct. Also printing is never a good idea, if I see you printing and I'm going to do bad... I've already isolated your play.

Shooting someone in the foot is the same as shooting them in the face as far as lethal forces is concerned.
 
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aeroektar

Pelican
I feel for those of you who need to get fingerprinted for a permit or license, half of this country is constitutional carry where none of that BS is required.

If you want to carry, do it, but you must train and become proficient. Becoming proficient with a handgun isn't a quick or easy process. We are most likely talking a couple thousand rounds, and dozens of range sessions. Red dots on pistols are a huge advantage, they are becoming commonplace, they help speed up the process of becoming proficient, and ultimately increase capability, especially in scenarios like with Eli Dicken in Indiana, needing to engage a target at 40 yards quickly. People are now running a drill to simulate that event, 40 yards, draw from concealment, fire 10 rounds in under 15 seconds and get at least 8 hits (on something like an IPSC target). Learn to enjoy the process, men should, and have all throughout history.
 

get2choppaaa

Hummingbird
Orthodox
If you've ever been fingerprinted for anything else like a driver's license, they have you on file. What's one more fingerprint?
I'm just gonna leave this out there...

There's a digital bio signature for every legal person in the US. They've already got ALL your info. It's just if they want to use it or not.
 

Pointy Elbows

Kingfisher
Orthodox
I encourage all reasonable, conservative people to at least be very well trained handgun owners. We want the good guys prepared. You might as well get one, train up, and lock it away if you are not comfortable with daily carry.

Caveat: If you, or anyone in your house, has depression or serious mental illness, don't do it. Even with young adult kids in the house, keep it locked up. I know people devastated after family members killed themselves with their gun.
 

Max Roscoe

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm just gonna leave this out there...

There's a digital bio signature for every legal person in the US. They've already got ALL your info. It's just if they want to use it or not.
Don't want to get too off topic but... I have never been fingerprinted.
If my prints are found somewhere, they will come back as "unknown prints" which are not in a police or government database to identify me by. I see people claiming this a lot, so I can only assume other states are collecting bio info on all their citizens which is a shame. But it's not the case here. Who knows, if you're born post-2000 they may print everyone as a baby. That wouldn't surprise me.

That said, if I decided I wanted to carry a pistol, and the only thing holding me back was giving a fingerprint, I would. I probably wouldn't when I was younger, but as I age, I'm more ok with making compromises, giving people things I normally wouldn't, if it benefits me in some way. It's why I put up with the TSA to travel.
 

kruger41

Sparrow
Don't want to get too off topic but... I have never been fingerprinted.
If my prints are found somewhere, they will come back as "unknown prints" which are not in a police or government database to identify me by. I see people claiming this a lot, so I can only assume other states are collecting bio info on all their citizens which is a shame. But it's not the case here. Who knows, if you're born post-2000 they may print everyone as a baby. That wouldn't surprise me.

That said, if I decided I wanted to carry a pistol, and the only thing holding me back was giving a fingerprint, I would. I probably wouldn't when I was younger, but as I age, I'm more ok with making compromises, giving people things I normally wouldn't, if it benefits me in some way. It's why I put up with the TSA to travel.
Even if "they" don't have your prints on file, there's a much wider variety of biometric data and similar that can identify you.


If you or a relative ever submitted one of those 23 and Me DNA tests, the government and various corporate entities have access to that. If you ever served in the Armed Forces of the US or any aligned NATO country, they have your medical and dental records on file. Your internet history, banking/credit card purchases, cellular data, digital photos you've saved to cloud servers, can paint a mosaic of your interests, your regular range of movement, etc. IIRC, there's an algo in existence that can describe your personality and probable future activity based on the aforementioned inputs. Not to be overly conspiratorial, but fingerprints alone are chump change compared to everything they have access to.
 

Frussell

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
I say get one if you have family you love and want to protect. On two occasions about a decade or so apart, my father defended our house from intruders. First time was a shotgun, someone broke in and he just racked the gun at the top of the stairs, never even saw the guy. Universal sound of get away from me. Second time someone was trying to sneakily open the back slider and he saw the movement, pointed a revolver and yelled HEY! The person slowly backed away and left the scene. This was in an 80 to 90 % white, middle and upper middle class suburban area. Very little crime. He would've conceal carried but in that particular state it wouldn't have been legal. Never needed it either thank God.
 

Cavalier

Kingfisher
Orthodox
If you call the police, nobody on a jury will ask the question, "Why didn't he just call the police". If you scream for help, likewise. Either or both may help your claim that you believed your life or severe bodily harm was at stake. Or, that of your family.

Of course, do the right thing. But, use of lethal force will set off a whole chain of events that may not end up in your favor. And that may be how the cards fall.

I generally don't comment when I don't know what I'm talking about, from actual personal experience. On that note, I'm checking out.
I would prefer to be alive and well and have to face the consequences of the shooting, as opposed to dead and not have to worry about anything.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
I would prefer to be alive and well and have to face the consequences of the shooting, as opposed to dead and not have to worry about anything.
And so, we are in 100% agreement. What you do before and after the event only impacts how favorably your claim of imminent death, etc. is received by a jury. It changes nothing about the need (or legal right) to protect yourself or your loved ones. This is the point I have been thusfar unsuccessful in making. Do the right thing, regardless. Face the consequences, however the cards fall.
 
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NotaBene

Robin
Protestant
Do the right thing, regardless. Face the consequences, however the cards fall.

The man is correct, but I also bet he doesn't live in the glorious state of MA, where even thinking about guns is a felony, heh.

Keeping a loaded gun of any kind in my house without it being under my "direct control" or in a safe could land me in prison for many years. That's just one of many stupid laws like that. I'm tempted to move to a constitutional carry state just to put my mind more at ease.
 

fortyfive

Kingfisher
Other Christian
When someone has the ability to stop evil and he chose not to do it and instead is playing the defenseless victim and even pretend that it's a virtue, to being unprepared and unarmed, then he is very wrong.
That position is not moral virtue but cowardice and the approval of evil.

I pity the wife and kids of such a man when they would need protection.
 
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