TravelerKai’s Martial Arts Datasheet

@Dr Mantis Toboggan

It’s worth training in Wing Chun also. It’s not really an effective martial art, but chi sao will help you develop a level of sensitivity that will surprise you for BJJ
 

kel

Ostrich
I want to take up martial arts again - some kind of MMA type thing, focusing on pragmatics, a Jeet Kun Do style blend of systema, krav maga, BJJ, and wing chun. Tough to find that kind of person. I'd rather find a trainer, pay him well, and get personal lessons than go to a dojo. I'm trying to give my money directly to people as much as possible.
 
For self defense and money is an issue, bjj is the best mixed in with boxing basics like high guard and basic combos.

There plenty of gyms to choose from if you're in socal or texas. They've got McDojos all over the place as well as less conventional MMA gyms and personal instructors for aikido, wing chun, etc.
 
(Apologies in advance - no, this thread bump is not the return of TravelerKai.)

Video from Vladimir Vasiliev who runs a Systema school in Toronto. His english is fairly basic, so usually his wife narrates his videos. It's a just a basic checklist for staying healthy in a stressful time. Ideally, we should already have been following many of these suggestions. It's followed by some breathing exercises for relieving tension.


I'm a big fan of the Systema breath work; it has helped me greatly in some very high-stress situations.

Here is a copy of the checklist they refer to in the video:
system10.jpg
 

Papist

Sparrow
I trained in karate for a number of years, though never got my shodan (2nd kyu). I have also boxed on and off over the years.

Having got sober, I'm now looking to train again. I have thought about judo, but I really don't want to damage my back or knees, which the OP states is highly likely. I think BJJ is overrated and wouldn't be very practical in a street fight. Ideally I'd like to train in something I could continue into old age - so I'm considering wing chun. During lockdown I have been training with a friend, hitting pads, and practising some kicks and I'm enjoying myself. So I thought I might continue with that, too. We have been watching videos on YouTube and taking a good technique and then drilling it.

Has anyone heard of Russell Stutely and his wave form technique? I bought a copy of one of his books, and have watched some videos of his, but I can't quite seem to make it work. I think, in part, it;s because I have drilled conventional punches so hard over the years, that it's difficult to learn new habits.

Also my wing chun chain punches are really weak. I have seen demos of them, and know they can be quite powerful. I had a friend who was a football casual (hooligan) and one of the lads in his firm practised wing chun and apparently knocked a guy out with a single 'rabbit punch' as my pal described it.

Don;t get me wrong, I'm not at all violent. In fact I have let a few people off over the years, when I could have rightly battered them.
 
I trained in karate for a number of years, though never got my shodan (2nd kyu). I have also boxed on and off over the years.

Having got sober, I'm now looking to train again. I have thought about judo, but I really don't want to damage my back or knees, which the OP states is highly likely. I think BJJ is overrated and wouldn't be very practical in a street fight. Ideally I'd like to train in something I could continue into old age - so I'm considering wing chun. During lockdown I have been training with a friend, hitting pads, and practising some kicks and I'm enjoying myself. So I thought I might continue with that, too. We have been watching videos on YouTube and taking a good technique and then drilling it.

Has anyone heard of Russell Stutely and his wave form technique? I bought a copy of one of his books, and have watched some videos of his, but I can't quite seem to make it work. I think, in part, it;s because I have drilled conventional punches so hard over the years, that it's difficult to learn new habits.

Also my wing chun chain punches are really weak. I have seen demos of them, and know they can be quite powerful. I had a friend who was a football casual (hooligan) and one of the lads in his firm practised wing chun and apparently knocked a guy out with a single 'rabbit punch' as my pal described it.

Don;t get me wrong, I'm not at all violent. In fact I have let a few people off over the years, when I could have rightly battered them.
This Wing Chun guy lost against against MMA in China:
 

Papist

Sparrow
This Wing Chun guy lost against against MMA in China:
Of course he did!

I wasn't suggesting wing chun is some incredible martial art, rather 'something I could continue into old age'. Wing chun would be a hobby, although it does have devastating finger strikes (aimed at one's eye) and low kicks which attack the shin, knee and groin - none of which cannot be tested in a sporting contest. But I like the idea of using the wooden man.
 
Of course he did!

I wasn't suggesting wing chun is some incredible martial art, rather 'something I could continue into old age'. Wing chun would be a hobby, although it does have devastating finger strikes (aimed at one's eye) and low kicks which attack the shin, knee and groin - none of which cannot be tested in a sporting contest. But I like the idea of using the wooden man.

As a fighting style. It hasn't been tested as thoroughly in sparring than MMA as a result throwing away the useless and keeping the useful or spurring innovation. So its not as refined and effective.
 

Papist

Sparrow
As a fighting style. It hasn't been tested as thoroughly in sparring than MMA as a result throwing away the useless and keeping the useful or spurring innovation. So its not as refined and effective.
MMA is good, don't get me wrong. However, are groin strikes permitted? Eye gouges? Knee strikes? Throat strikes? Biting? When the sporting arena outlaws the most deadly and debilitating techniques, the participants tend to lose their awareness of them. MMA is the best all round combat sport, though.

ETA:

 
MMA is good, don't get me wrong. However, are groin strikes permitted? Eye gouges? Knee strikes? Throat strikes? Biting? When the sporting arena outlaws the most deadly and debilitating techniques, the participants tend to lose their awareness of them. MMA is the best all round combat sport, though.
Of course not. But I think wing chun wouldn't do so well in a real right either than MMA.

Because it's too often a focus on forms rather than working on how to do when the adrenaline is running high or you just got punched in the face.
 

Papist

Sparrow
Of course not. But I think wing chun wouldn't do so well in a real right either than MMA.

Because it's too often a focus on forms rather than working on how to do when the adrenaline is running high or you just got punched in the face.
I agree completely. If I was a young man, and was only interested in self defence, I would pick either judo or sambo, which I'd cross train with boxing. I'd then practice knee stomps, front kicks, the side kick (yoko geri) and finger strikes (targeting the eyes and throat).

The boxing punches and karate kicks I am currently training. When I lose some weight I may start finger push ups, and begin to condition my fingers for finger strikes.

Wing chun will mostly be a hobby, but anything I can use I will add to my repertoire.
 
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I agree completely. If I was a young man, and was only interested in self defence I would pick either judo or sambo, which I'd cross train with boxing. I'd then practice knee stomps, front kicks, the side kick (yoko geri) and finger strikes (targeting the eyes and throat).

The boxing punches and karate kicks I am currently training. When I lose some weight I may start finger push ups, and begin to condition my fingers for finger strikes.

Wing chun will mostly be a hobby, but anything I can use I will add to my repertoire.
Make sure you do sparring. Because practicing those techniques is one thing. Actual application is another.

And becoming dizzy because you got punched or losing your balance as a result of getting hit can throw these out the window. You must condition yourself to be able to deal with that.

Spar with opponents of various different styles.
 

Dr Mantis Toboggan

Kingfisher
Gold Member
MMA is good, don't get me wrong. However, are groin strikes permitted? Eye gouges? Knee strikes? Throat strikes? Biting? When the sporting arena outlaws the most deadly and debilitating techniques, the participants tend to lose their awareness of them. MMA is the best all round combat sport, though.

ETA:


Aside from biting (which doesn't exactly require years of practice to master) all the techniques you mention can be accomplished with common MMA techniques by adjusting the aim a few inches.
 
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