Saints Trying to I.D. a Specific Saint of the Desert from the Orthodox Study Bible

Charbel Makhlouf

Sparrow
Orthodox
A saint of the desert once found his hut being looted of its paltry possessions, and he knelt in the corner praying for the bandits. When they left, the monk realized they had not taken his walking stick. This monk pursued them for many days until he was able to give them the stick as well. Seeing his humility, the bandits returned everything to him and were converted to Jesus Christ.

The above is a snippet of commentary in Matthew chapter 5 in my Orthodox Study Bible.

I tried to identify the saint using Google, but was not able to hunt him down.

Does anyone know the specific Saint from this story? I would very much like to read more about his life (if more about his life is available).
 

GuitarVH

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
The above is a snippet of commentary in Matthew chapter 5 in my Orthodox Study Bible.

I tried to identify the saint using Google, but was not able to hunt him down.

Does anyone know the specific Saint from this story? I would very much like to read more about his life (if more about his life is available).

I was curious so I did some searches and I found someone who may fit though I am not entirely sure. It's based on a similar story of a desert saint converting a bandit. The saint I found is named "Saint Serapion, Bishop of Thmuis".

An excerpt from the below articles says: "Once he fell into the hands of a bandit, and by his powers of persuasion he managed to turn the tables on him, and made this robber a servant of God". It also confirms he was a 4th century monk and lived in the desert of Sketis.


Saint Serapion was also a great scholar and theologian and wrote works on the Holy Spirit (opposing the Arian and Macedonian heresies) and an anti-Manichean treatise. He was good friends with Saint Athanasius and Saint Anthony the Great.


Again, I am not 100% sure this is the same desert saint referred to in your post but it's possible since his philanthropy, mercy and humility were legendary as was his scholarship.

Someone please correct me if I am wrong on this.
 
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nagareboshi

Woodpecker
Orthodox
The above is a snippet of commentary in Matthew chapter 5 in my Orthodox Study Bible.

I tried to identify the saint using Google, but was not able to hunt him down.

Does anyone know the specific Saint from this story? I would very much like to read more about his life (if more about his life is available).

You should read “Sayings of the Desert Fathers”. I remember a somewhat different monk who returned to his hut and saw that he was being robbed and, seeing the thief loading his possessions on a donkey, went over and gave him a helping hand.
 
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