Web Browser Privacy

My retort is that Mozilla is globalist now. All I did was deactivate Brave shields adblocker and installed Ublock Origins on Brave.
If Brave starts to turn SJW I'll switch to something else, but for now Mozilla Firefox doesn't seem like a 'safer' option.

Does Mozilla disrespect user privacy like Chrome does?

Do they make it hard for the user to configure the browser like Chrome-based browser do?

Is Mozilla based on Chromium like Brave is?
 
Does Mozilla disrespect user privacy like Chrome does?

Do they make it hard for the user to configure the browser like Chrome-based browser do?

Is Mozilla based on Chromium like Brave is?

Just looking at the pros/cons of all the options and making a decision. Mozilla is obviously taking a political stance and want to explore all the options.
.
On a side note, it's insane to think there's only a few good choices left without using a globohomo browser..
 
Just looking at the pros/cons of all the options and making a decision. Mozilla is obviously taking a political stance and want to explore all the options.
.
On a side note, it's insane to think there's only a few good choices left without using a globohomo browser..

IMO we have to accept that all the big companies are leftist scum. Even duckduckgo, telegram, etc. They are just hiding in the shadows, waiting to get enough user traction. That's exactly what facebook did : at the beginning it was really awesome. You can google "facebook ui 2007" to remember. And google too was awesome at the beginning. They did things very progressively, scheming, talking about the best way to dupe users, A/B testing....
 

prendergast

Sparrow
How can you enjoy using that shitty "Brave" browser. I tried it and everything about it stinks. Also it's pretty obvious their business-model is very ad-hungry so you're pretty naive to use them.
Please explain why being "ad-hungry" is necessarily a bad thing? Every company that offers a free service yet still wants to do well financially will have a big focus on advertising, no? They need to make a profit somehow.

Besides, ads in Brave are *completely optional*. I personally don't like seeing ads so I have them disabled and have never seen a single ad while using Brave.

Also, there's a key difference between being paid to see benign ads for Verizon or other sponsors, which is what Brave offers, and having your entire screen filled with never-ending ads (some of which are borderline pornographic or just plain creepy) which is what happens when you browse the Internet without any sort of ad blocking.

I mean you get paid BAT currency every month which can easily be converted to fiat. Something like $5 a month if you're an average user. Getting paid to browse the internet and seeing an ad every once in a while isn't too bad a deal.
 

andy dufresne

Kingfisher
Does Mozilla disrespect user privacy like Chrome does?

Do they make it hard for the user to configure the browser like Chrome-based browser do?

Is Mozilla based on Chromium like Brave is?

Two words: F**K MOZILLA.

They are bundled with that 'Pocket' crap. It's the default empty page that shows the latest 'news'. Pocket is complete lefty drivel. I won't use Firefox ever again.
 

louisjxn

Pigeon
The guy who craeted Brave was also the creator of Firefox. Mozilla booted him years ago for donating to an anti-gay marriage group. That's when he started Brave. I've been using it since it was in beta. Love it. And a Eich is a stand-up guy.

 

joost

Kingfisher
Why is nobody talking about epic browser? user friendly browser, privacy oriented and comes with an inbuilt vpn

I wouldn't trust a free VPN. I checked Epic Browser and it's based on Chromium. I think it is better to install Ungoogled Chromium and install uBlock Origins. As for cookies, whitelist only the websites you visit.
 
My 50 cents - more theoretic than practical advice:

* Your browser and yourself you have multiple fingerprints. (Timing pattern of your mouse and keyboard clicks, order how you visit sites, etc. You can find this stuff in IT related talks.) This means that if you do not do against these then they can follow you even if you disable cookies.
* Cookies are necessary to follow even a single session. News sites could work without them (theoretically) but shopping carts etc will not work without them.

My advice:

* Do not disable cookies entirely but regularly delete them. This way features will work but they can't use the cookies for cross-tracking. If you want to keep a few sessions permanent then use a different profile for those and for other browsing.
* Totally anonymous browsing is only possible through "stolen" internet. And you also have to check the fingerprint of your browser and change your mouse and keyboard timing by using it in an awkward way. If you use a setup for anonymous browsing then you should not use that same setup for "normal" browsing. It is best if the anonymous browsing computer is totally separate of your "public" computer.
 
Top