Weird things you noticed lately

Gimlet

Pelican
I still don't know what "contemporary" means in the context of this class haha. But the contemporary biology class is a class for non-biology majors who need a bio class to fulfill their general studies requirements. For example, I am a computer science major but I need 2 quarters of biology for generals. Contemporary bio is a lot easier and watered down than general biology because it's created for people who aren't biology-oriented.
I was curious so I googled. Lots of course descriptions online; here is a random one from a UC location. It sounds like Marxist indoctrination... so you are right you likely are hearing nonsense.


BIO 001: Contemporary Biology​


Units: 4

Introduces the major concepts in biology including origin of life, evolution, DNA, genes and genomes. Principles and patterns of inheritance, biotechnology, biodiversity, earth systems, environments and disease relationships in addition to ecosystem structures, function, nutrient cycles, pollution, and genotypes to phenotypes.
 

OrthoMexicano

 
Banned
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm a college student and I'm taking a contemporary biology class. We're learning about the immune system and pathogens right now and the professor spent a whole class period talking about the covid spike protein, how it works, and how the vaccine can defend against it. During class I thought back to some research I had done and I don't think that the covid-19 virus has even been isolated yet. So I'm not even sure how they know there's a spike protein if they haven't even isolated the virus. I need to ask my professor about this and see what he says. But I've noticed lately during the course of this biology class that some stuff in microbiology might not necessarily be true. I'm not sure to what extent, but I think something's up. I would love to hear Roosh's opinion on this because he was an actual scientist.

They pretend know a lot, in reality know very little. Who really know? God, Jesus, holy spirit, saints only. Professor especial in university are worst because full of hubris and pride. Ask them if they know why have they got everything wrong?

Vaccine prevent against transmit. NO.
Social distance work. NO.
Mask work. NO.
2 week flatten curve. NO.
 

Sisyphus

Kingfisher
Other Christian
Is it just me, or do people not bother to train their dogs anymore?

On a hike, a dog ran up and put its front paws on my chest. "Oh, he does that," the owner said. He does that? Is that supposed to be an apology? I remember a time when the owner would have been outraged and humiliated. What if I had said "Oh, I just kick dogs that jump on me"?

On another hike, a big black lab starting barking its head off as I approached. "He's friendly," the owner said. Uh.. it doesn't look like it. The owner attempted to restrain the dog by putting it in a bear hug, but was unable to do so successfully. The dog broke free from his grasp and got in my face. No discipline or apology.

I went to a friend's house - the dog (who I'd met several times before) barked incessantly and showed teeth. "Oh no Rover," the wife sighed. At another friend's house, the husband and wife were unable to quiet their pitbull who barked bloody murder for ten minutes straight while their young children tried to sleep upstairs.

On a camping trip two of my friends' dogs started attacking each other and had to be pulled off each other, biting and drawing blood from one of the owners in the process.

My one acquaintance mentioned that he couldn't take the dog out on walks anymore because he can't control it, so now it just walks laps around the fenced in backyard.

I could go on and on. The dogs don't sit, come, stay, or any of it, and the owner doesn't seem to be upset at the dog or feel the need to apologize for its behavior. I used to love dogs but now I tense up every time I see one. I guess the effects of the permissive parenting which started to become fashionable in the 90's are now being transferred to the canine replacement children of the current generation.

But oddly enough, I see this behavior in people in their 40's and 50's.

Your thoughts?
 

Sisyphus

Kingfisher
Other Christian
I'm a college student and I'm taking a contemporary biology class. We're learning about the immune system and pathogens right now and the professor spent a whole class period talking about the covid spike protein, how it works, and how the vaccine can defend against it.

Please ask your professor if he's read the 2015 paper by Fehr and Perlman about coronaviruses which has been cited over 3000 times. It says:

Vaccine development for coronaviruses faces many challenges... the propensity of the viruses to recombine may pose a problem by rendering the vaccine useless and potentially increasing the evolution and diversity of the virus. Finally it has been shown in FIPV that vaccination with S[pike] protein leads to enhanced disease...Owing to the lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines, the best measures to control human coronaviruses remain a strong public health surveillance system coupled with rapid diagnostic testing and quarantine when necessary.

I beseech you Theo, show him/her/it (you never know in academia) this paper and the relevant passages and report back about their response. I would love to hear how they trust and follow the science.

 

inthefade

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Is it just me, or do people not bother to train their dogs anymore?

On a hike, a dog ran up and put its front paws on my chest. "Oh, he does that," the owner said. He does that? Is that supposed to be an apology? I remember a time when the owner would have been outraged and humiliated. What if I had said "Oh, I just kick dogs that jump on me"?

On another hike, a big black lab starting barking its head off as I approached. "He's friendly," the owner said. Uh.. it doesn't look like it. The owner attempted to restrain the dog by putting it in a bear hug, but was unable to do so successfully. The dog broke free from his grasp and got in my face. No discipline or apology.

I went to a friend's house - the dog (who I'd met several times before) barked incessantly and showed teeth. "Oh no Rover," the wife sighed. At another friend's house, the husband and wife were unable to quiet their pitbull who barked bloody murder for ten minutes straight while their young children tried to sleep upstairs.

On a camping trip two of my friends' dogs started attacking each other and had to be pulled off each other, biting and drawing blood from one of the owners in the process.

My one acquaintance mentioned that he couldn't take the dog out on walks anymore because he can't control it, so now it just walks laps around the fenced in backyard.

I could go on and on. The dogs don't sit, come, stay, or any of it, and the owner doesn't seem to be upset at the dog or feel the need to apologize for its behavior. I used to love dogs but now I tense up every time I see one. I guess the effects of the permissive parenting which started to become fashionable in the 90's are now being transferred to the canine replacement children of the current generation.

But oddly enough, I see this behavior in people in their 40's and 50's.

Your thoughts?
I am biased since I see jerks trespassing on my property with their dogs daily, but it's like the dog leads the person. There's this one guy that will just stand there blankly and let his dog do whatever it wants to my yard and plants for 10+ minutes.

There's one exception that is a black couple that doesn't leash their dog, but the dog is incredibly well behaved. Just keeps walking right next to the owners. No barking, no feces on others' property, no wandering around on others' property. Lovely golden retriever.
 
Last edited:

Theo'sTheories

Robin
Other Christian
Please ask your professor if he's read the 2015 paper by Fehr and Perlman about coronaviruses which has been cited over 3000 times. It says:



I beseech you Theo, show him/her/it (you never know in academia) this paper and the relevant passages and report back about their response. I would love to hear how they trust and follow the science.

That's a really good source! Thank you for sharing! I will definitely ask him about this after class tomorrow. I'm trying to get all my thoughts on this organized so that I can sum them up in a short amount of time and then ask him what he thinks. Thanks again!
 

Easy_C

Peacock
Is it just me, or do people not bother to train their dogs anymore?

On a hike, a dog ran up and put its front paws on my chest. "Oh, he does that," the owner said. He does that? Is that supposed to be an apology? I remember a time when the owner would have been outraged and humiliated. What if I had said "Oh, I just kick dogs that jump on me"?

On another hike, a big black lab starting barking its head off as I approached. "He's friendly," the owner said. Uh.. it doesn't look like it. The owner attempted to restrain the dog by putting it in a bear hug, but was unable to do so successfully. The dog broke free from his grasp and got in my face. No discipline or apology.

I went to a friend's house - the dog (who I'd met several times before) barked incessantly and showed teeth. "Oh no Rover," the wife sighed. At another friend's house, the husband and wife were unable to quiet their pitbull who barked bloody murder for ten minutes straight while their young children tried to sleep upstairs.

On a camping trip two of my friends' dogs started attacking each other and had to be pulled off each other, biting and drawing blood from one of the owners in the process.

My one acquaintance mentioned that he couldn't take the dog out on walks anymore because he can't control it, so now it just walks laps around the fenced in backyard.

I could go on and on. The dogs don't sit, come, stay, or any of it, and the owner doesn't seem to be upset at the dog or feel the need to apologize for its behavior. I used to love dogs but now I tense up every time I see one. I guess the effects of the permissive parenting which started to become fashionable in the 90's are now being transferred to the canine replacement children of the current generation.

But oddly enough, I see this behavior in people in their 40's and 50's.

Your thoughts?

I've noticed. The only trained dogs I know of are from my wife, her parents, and her best friend who are all common sense country types.

Short version is that training a dog successfully requires consistency, discipline, and some degree of "Alpha". All things completely lacking in Millenials.
 

inthefade

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Why don't you response to this?
I've asked him once in person to stay off my side of the sidewalk when I saw it happening, but I can't always catch him in the act. I mostly see this stuff on camera. If they see me in person they move along quickly. I'll be getting a front fence soon, I just wish I didn't have to. I've put up signs to no avail. Some dog owners seem to be oblivious and think dogs shitting on others' property is normal. I can't spray the guy with a hose, fight him, or brandish a weapon without some legal stuff going down.
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
Is it just me, or do people not bother to train their dogs anymore?

On a hike, a dog ran up and put its front paws on my chest. "Oh, he does that," the owner said. He does that? Is that supposed to be an apology? I remember a time when the owner would have been outraged and humiliated. What if I had said "Oh, I just kick dogs that jump on me"?

On another hike, a big black lab starting barking its head off as I approached. "He's friendly," the owner said. Uh.. it doesn't look like it. The owner attempted to restrain the dog by putting it in a bear hug, but was unable to do so successfully. The dog broke free from his grasp and got in my face. No discipline or apology.

I went to a friend's house - the dog (who I'd met several times before) barked incessantly and showed teeth. "Oh no Rover," the wife sighed. At another friend's house, the husband and wife were unable to quiet their pitbull who barked bloody murder for ten minutes straight while their young children tried to sleep upstairs.

On a camping trip two of my friends' dogs started attacking each other and had to be pulled off each other, biting and drawing blood from one of the owners in the process.

My one acquaintance mentioned that he couldn't take the dog out on walks anymore because he can't control it, so now it just walks laps around the fenced in backyard.

I could go on and on. The dogs don't sit, come, stay, or any of it, and the owner doesn't seem to be upset at the dog or feel the need to apologize for its behavior. I used to love dogs but now I tense up every time I see one. I guess the effects of the permissive parenting which started to become fashionable in the 90's are now being transferred to the canine replacement children of the current generation.

But oddly enough, I see this behavior in people in their 40's and 50's.

Your thoughts?

Oh man...I've got beefs with multiple dog owners at the place where I live.

The family who lives underneath me has a large poodle that goes berserk whenever it sees a dog on the path down below us. Not only does it bark its head off but it launches itself at the bedroom window which often wakes me up before 7 in the morning. I've already reported them multiple times to management.

Another dog owner lets his young boy walk their little wiener dog which is an ankle-biter. When I walk by them, the dog lunges at my feet trying to nip me. The boy does nothing of course. I haven't said anything yet because I don't like to scold children and the owners seem nice. But if it does it again...

Then there's a girl who lives across from me who owns a pit bull and walks it around without a leash! Like it's some lovable labrador or something. The girl by the way has tats up and down her legs. It's a tragedy as she's got a nice body but ruins it with these tats. But yeah, no surprise she owns a pit bull. Apparently, it already bit one of the maintenance guys...probably because it wasn't on a leash.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
I've been putting some deep thought into what our society is doing to us. What I conclude is that society is set out to destroy men (and women) at every level imaginable. Think about it: they're trying to poison you through food, they're trying to destroy your relationship, they're trying to kill your baby through abortion, they're trying you to be unhappy, they're trying to destroy you spiritually, they're trying to keep you financially struggling, they're literally trying to send you to hell eternally for everlasting punishment. There's nothing wholesome, nothing, that society is doing to us at this moment. It's absolute and utter insanity when you really deeply think this through. We must be aware of this, in order to guard the gates of our minds to every piece of information that's thrown at us daily.
 
Last edited:

ed pluribus unum

Ostrich
Protestant
I started to dig into 70s feminism. Two first names that popped up were Gloria Steinem and Jean Baker Miller. The first was clear, with the second I knew enough when I saw the Bronx. Fascinating how everything you know about the aliens get confirmed instantly when doing research.

You search online for "jewish feminists" and you end up with something that looks like one of those "who runs the media networks" posters...

laid out.JPG
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
You search online for "jewish feminists" and you end up with something that looks like one of those "who runs the media networks" posters...

View attachment 37219
And that's the funny thing, I wasn't even LOOKING for them, yet they end up having a 100% representation score. Once you recognize the names and physionomy, and also birthplaces like the Bronx, you can spot them faster than that Barney can throw 180.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Kingfisher
Orthodox
And that's the funny thing, I wasn't even LOOKING for them, yet they end up having a 100% representation score. Once you recognize the names and physionomy, and also birthplaces like the Bronx, you can spot them faster than that Barney can throw 180.
For me the following are clues for spotting a tractor:

1. Born usually in/around NY.
2. Eastern European last name.
3. Physionomy.
 

Sabonis73

Robin
Catholic
This accurately reflects my feelings whenever someone finishes a conversation with "stay safe" or "be safe" or some similar platitude. The only thing is, I feel like this was a thing before the 'Rona. I'm pretty sure "be safe" etc. started becoming a common turn of phrase several years ago, I wonder why.

View attachment 37218
I'm guilty of this. I been saying it for years specifically to delivery drivers, cops and people that I know that are going to be traveling into the not so good areas. I live in a high crime city. A 50ish year old grandmother Doordash driver got gunned down last week here.
 

Thomas More

Crow
Protestant
I'm guilty of this. I been saying it for years specifically to delivery drivers, cops and people that I know that are going to be traveling into the not so good areas. I live in a high crime city. A 50ish year old grandmother Doordash driver got gunned down last week here.
The "stay safe" thing annoys me too, and all the "Safety First" posters you see at work. I started seeing all this and being annoyed by it in the 90s.

However, in the case of work place safety, I had to come around and accept the value of this. I was working in a warehouse at the time, and there were several injuries over the course of a year. I have know of several very bad injuries from the place I worked in my 20s, like legs and hands being ripped off by factory equipment. In one case, the supervisor was standing near the machine my wife operated (this was where I met my wife). The supervisor saw a piece of plastic hanging loose and went to grab it out, but her hand got caught, and was chopped so bad that it was only hanging by a flap of skin at the wrist. They managed to repair it, but that's a really bad injury.

Anyway, I realized the extreme safety culture in the workplace really does result in more people going home every night without injuries. I suppose I still am always a little annoyed at seeing safety messages plastered all over every surface.
 
Top