What are you currently reading?

bojangles

Crow
Gold Member
Dynasty: Rise and Fall of the House of Caesar by Tom Holland. He's a great historian especially when it comes to Ancient Rome. It's my second reading of it. He famously did a documentary on Islam basically showing how its a load of bollocks and that Mohammed was probably an invention.

I need to get In the Shadow of the Sword. As liberals and islamic apologists have condemned it so I'm sure its a really good book
 

lonewolf1992

Woodpecker
I know the ethos of this community is to consume more practical reading that may be of some use in our self-improvement projects and life. But I actually love fiction as English is not my first language. The amount of vocabulary I learn by reading works of fiction is huge.

I'm currently reading H.P Lovecraft and his hellish and fancy-stirring work of Cosmic terror dubbed as the 'Call of Cthulhu'. Though I have to look for a lot of words on the dictionary, once I get them all his writing style is fascinating and it really gets me. I previously read 'At the Mountains of madness' and enjoyed the plot and tempo of the story. Reading is like feeding your mind.
 

The Grey

Sparrow
Thinking slow and fast. Great book, but I think reading a summary of it will be a better value / time investment (Long ass book and most valuable concepts can be described in short)

Next on list are Energy and Civilization, Manual by Epictetus and then the Foundation series by Asimov.
 

chicane

Woodpecker
Gold Member
"Victoria: A Novel of 4th Generation War" by Thomas Hobbes. A bit heavy handed, but he says things a lot of people are thinking these days.
 

Hypno

Crow
Investment Biker by Jim Rogers.

This was written in the early 90s, after the Berlin Wall fell but before the Soviet Union disintegrated.

Rogers is the bow-tie wearing investment guru who made his fortune as partner with George Soros in the Quantum Fund. He probably made a lot less than Soros although he retired at 37 to write books and teach at Columbia business school.

This is the story of Rogers, then 50, epic round the world journey by motorcycle with his then early 20s girlfriend. Its quite a geography lesson even though its 25+ years old now. Interspersed are his very red pill observations on economics, government, politics, etc. Its a mini economics lesson.

He has a sequel written about 5-7 years later called Adventure Capitalist. Same idea but he goes by car and with a new woman, his then-fiance and I believe now wife.

I ready both of these 15+ years ago and am re-reading them now. I'm almost through the first one and its held up remarkably well.
 

PUA_Rachacha

Woodpecker
The Book of a New Sun by Gene Wolfe. Only about 50 pages in, but very well written, although somewhat obtuse in the writing. Considered one of the better fantasy/sci-fi books ever written.
 

Richard Turpin

Kingfisher
Has anyone here managed to get through Edward Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire?

I notice you can get it on kindle for £1.99 and from what I hear of the book that's a bargain. Especially when there's six volumes of it and it may take a year and a half to read it all! Only trouble is, the couple of excerpts I've read from it are impenetrable to me and the book may be too far out of my comfort zone.
 

Stonk

Robin
Figured I'd revive this thread

Currently reading Discrimination and Disparity by Thomas Sowell.

He remains one of my best authors.

So, what are you reading?
 

Hypno

Crow
Richard Turpin said:
Has anyone here managed to get through Edward Gibbon's The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire?

I notice you can get it on kindle for £1.99 and from what I hear of the book that's a bargain. Especially when there's six volumes of it and it may take a year and a half to read it all! Only trouble is, the couple of excerpts I've read from it are impenetrable to me and the book may be too far out of my comfort zone.
I haven't begun it yet but I came across a one-volume version of his epic and bought it, as well as Paul Kennedy The Rise and Fall of the Great Empires. The latter book might be more accessible and may be more relevant to your inquiry.
 
Just finished the letters of St. Patrick (Confession and Letter to Coroticus), currently reading St. Bede's commentary on the Book of Acts and a book by the "One For Israel Ministries" guys about countering Rabbinic arguments against Christ's being the Messiah.

Fiction-wise I'm slowly working my way through a volume of Pushkin's and the collected works of Nathaniel Hawthorne. Also just ordered the first book in Timothy Zahn's "Thrawn" trilogy after hearing people say it's how the Star Wars saga should have ended rather than the last three movies we got.
 
Books that I'm currently reading or re-reading :

The Frackers- it's based on the inside story of the energy revolution
Liar's Poker - story of a bond salesman on Wall Street
Freakonomics - various economic theories applied beautifully in diverse subjects (re-read, first time was a speed read now detailing)
Small Loans Big Dreams - on microfinance and how Nobel Prize Winner Muhammad Yanus revolutionised global anti-poverty efforts ( gift from my father )
 
I just read Ham on Rye from Bukowski for entertainment. Easy read it took two days.
Also few pages into Evola's Ride the Tiger, but it takes too much mental strain.
 

Wutang

Hummingbird
Gold Member
Reading this right now - appropriate for this Christmas season

https://www.crossway.org/books/calvin-on-the-christian-life-tpb/

"John Calvin, a man adored by some and maligned by others, stands as a legendary figure in Christian history. In Calvin on the Christian Life, professor Michael Horton offers us fresh insights into the Reformer’s personal piety and practical theology by allowing Calvin to speak in his own words.

Drawing not only from his Institutes and biblical commentaries, but also from lesser-known tracts, treatises, and letters, this book will deepen your understanding of Calvin’s theology and ministry by exploring the heart of his spiritual life: confident trust and unwavering joy in the sovereign grace of God."
 

Gusamaso

Sparrow
Didn't go thru the whole thread, but I'd appreciate recommendations of books on the Frankfurt School (and its horrors) and/or similar subjects.
 
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