What are you currently reading?

Mike_Key

Sparrow
CS Lewis

Previously:

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Prince Caspian
The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
The Silver Chair
The Horse and His Boy
The Magician's Nephew
The Last Battle

The Four Loves

The Screwtape Letters
Plus "Screwtape Proposes a Toast"

The Great Divorce

Currently:

Mere Christianity
(4 lectures given during and after WWII)

I've been reading all CS Lewis works for a while now. Do you have any questions?

Feel free to ask ...

John 3:16
 

Hypno

Crow
Those 7 CS Lewis Lion-Witch-Wardrobe books are very interesting, almost to the level of Tolkien. They are not nearly as popular in the U.S. as they are in England but for no good reason. If you haven't read them, they are an enjoyable read with Christian symbolism.
 

Enigma

Hummingbird
Gold Member
The Screwtape Letters, by CS Lewis, is excellent.

I have the bad habit of "reading" too many books at the same time lately, but my current fiction read is Dostoevsky's Demons.
 
"A mind of her own: an evolutionary psychology of women" by Anne Campbell. It is one of those books that you're not supposed to read, given the work's analysis of evolutionary gender dynamics, and seeking to explain why women act the way they act.
 
Read all of David Bach’s best-seller “Automatic Millionaire” today. The cover and title are the typical greed-based marketing, but the content of this book is extremely useful and not at all the get rich quick, money grubbing stuff the title makes it sound like. If you’re brand-new to the concept of intelligent money management, ie, how to divide up your paycheck or other revenue streams to start saving up for retirement in a way that compounds well over time, then I can’t recommend this highly enough. Already set up the systems he recommends and now I have a “set it and forget it” type of auto-investing that will save me a lot of mental energy and time moving forward.

My only criticism of the book is that it repeats itself a lot, but it’s a fast read regardless and the charts are very useful.
 
Been reading short stories, Candide Optimism by Voltaire, is amazing read,

about an exceled 17th century prince, who travels around the world facing disaster, wars desases and still remains very optimistic and lucky.

We all need to read this gem. I reccommend it
 
"The Witchery of Archery" by Maurice Thompson, 1878. One man's account of his passion for bow hunting and the sport of archery as he travels through the woods and wilderness ("field and flood") of the South. The prose is quite dated now, even in comparison to early 20th century writing, but it is still quite enjoyable. As described in the foreword, it taps into the primal appeal of venturing out into nature with a bow and a quiver of arrows.

At the end of one chapter, following an extended stay in the Florida swamps with his brother and servant, he writes:
"... eight months will soon run by. They have run by again and again, and Will and I have drawn the bow on spots in Florida where never a white man fired a gun. Our steel arrowheads will be found imbedded in the trees of those strange forests a hundred years from now. But to what good? you ask. What good? It is a foolish question. Some men delight in Wall Street. What good? Some men travel in foreign lands. What good? Some delve at the desk, or rant at the forum, or dicker at the counter, year in and year out. What good? It is all good."
 

mojo

Pigeon
Joshua - a modern day Christian parable
by Joseph F. Girzone, a former priest

“God has graced you with many gifts, and you are very dear to Him, because you allow Him to use you as a partner in the work He has planned for your life.”

A man named Joshua moves to a small cabin on the edge of town. The locals are mystified by his quiet simplicity...he seems to seek nothing for himself. He supports himself by working as a carpenter, charging very little for his services, and his craftsmanship is exquisite. His way of being inspires both amazement and concern from the locals.

Joshua is benevolent and kind, humble and pure. In this world but not of it.
A very wholesome read.

66358-jesus-praying-gettyimages.1200w.tn.jpeg
 

AnonymousBosch

Crow
Gold Member
Currently taking a course on Dante's Divine Comedy while reading the poems of Shakespeare and St. Ephraim the Syrian.
I can recommend the recent JG Nichols versions both for affordability, for retaining the three line structure, and for having the untranslated text on each facing page, which helps you understand the natural rhythm stresses, which I find more useful than the more heavily-illustrated versions, though there is the occasional Dore etching supplied. I took a snap of the covers.



Whilst I enjoyed the translations at the time (the volumes appearing between 2014-2017), now I'm further on the journey, I can see the writing of the Saints appeal to me far more. Yes, it's a Classic Epic Poem, but the work of man still can't compare to Inspired Theology.

The Wordsworth Classics version is an 1814 translation by Henry Francis Cary that's enjoyable, if very of its time.
 
Just started the Iliad yesterday. I'm reading the Robert Fagles translation, there's a 60 page intro by Benard Knox to provide context, so I haven't actually started the story itself, but I should probably finish the intro either today or tomorrow.

Looking back it's amazing how few of the classics I had to read in school, and for the most part I read everything that was assigned to me. I've been meaning to correct this for a while, and where better to start than the poem that was basically the beginning of Western literature? I do think I was assigned the Odyssey at one point in high school, but I don't really remember much of it, so if I find the Iliad at all enjoyable I guess it will be next on my list.
 

AnonymousBosch

Crow
Gold Member
I had four different versions. It's an odd book, as I've found it gets easier to read the older the translation you have. The Modern Dover Thrift version translated by Croft is a terrible read. I ended up giving it to someone at Church.



I had a great little pocket sized one from 1920 with no listed translator, but I gave it via a friend to a young homeless man maybe 18 months ago, whom, coincidentally, turned up outside the Church on Divine Mercy Sunday recently.

I still have these two versions. The one on the right dates from 1903, and is heavily-florid, in that Victorian 'Sensibility' fashion, despite it being technically-Edwardian.



The one on the left is fantastic. It's a John Payne translation from 1825, that's obviously-been recovered, though the back endpages have a long protestant 'sola scriptura' screed against the book written in the politest, neatest penmanship. It fits perfectly into a back pocket, and I'd often take it with me while walking and dip into it now and again. You'll learn great words like 'precipitate' and 'pertinacious', and I can't quite help but read the entire thing in Quintus Curtius' voice. It's a perfect meditative work, if you are in the Purgative Way.

Note that St Therese of Lisieux had very little access to scripture or even a bible, until she entered the Carmel at Lisieux, but could recite 'The Imitation' by heart.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
I'm currently "reading" One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. I say that in quotes because it's an audiobook which by its nature isn't quite the same as the printed word. If it's anything close to the truth, fuck communism, even more. Every Antifa asshat ought to have this book thrown at them next time they think of pasting a hammer and sickle decal someplace public. The details, the behaviors, the small victories the characters cherish in the camps under endlessly terrible conditions - all of it accurately captured. Written under secrecy, the book was barely believed when published in 1962. American high schools as recently as the 1980s occasionally would assign it, but I'm guessing that's far less common nowadays. Too close to the sensibilities of the Bernie Bros.

Usually I only listen to less intense books like business bios or something else I might only read once and never go back to, but I don't regret getting this via Audible. I do grumble about putting money in Jeff Bezos's pocket, but at least it's for the work of a based author like Solzhenitsyn. I'm waiting for the day when they finally find a translator for 200 Years Together. In the meantime, this book is recommended.
 
I'm currently "reading" One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. I say that in quotes because it's an audiobook which by its nature isn't quite the same as the printed word. If it's anything close to the truth, fuck communism, even more. Every Antifa asshat ought to have this book thrown at them next time they think of pasting a hammer and sickle decal someplace public. The details, the behaviors, the small victories the characters cherish in the camps under endlessly terrible conditions - all of it accurately captured. Written under secrecy, the book was barely believed when published in 1962. American high schools as recently as the 1980s occasionally would assign it, but I'm guessing that's far less common nowadays. Too close to the sensibilities of the Bernie Bros.

Usually I only listen to less intense books like business bios or something else I might only read once and never go back to, but I don't regret getting this via Audible. I do grumble about putting money in Jeff Bezos's pocket, but at least it's for the work of a based author like Solzhenitsyn. I'm waiting for the day when they finally find a translator for 200 Years Together. In the meantime, this book is recommended.
Ah that was a good book. Not an easy read despite it being very short, but important in our time. While reading, I knew this was the past, and wondered if this was our future.

Women by Charles Bukowski

Slow reader here. I'm reading with my tablet. 10 pages every night or every other day. Tips on how to be good in reading?
I love that one, like I love anything from Bukowski. 'Post Office' is one of my all-time favourites.

I am reading 'The Crowd' by Gustave Le Bon. Timeless wisdom about crowd psychology.
 

Touchdown

Newbie
I've been reading Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky. Just finished part 2. It's my first time reading anything by Dostoevsky, and wow, it's really gripping. He has a way of capturing the main character's mental anguish that makes it seem so real. It's over 900 pages in my kindle but I'm surprised that it's still fairly easy to read. The pages are a good length and the chapters don't feel like they go on forever. Compare that to Libido Dominandi, which I tried to read before that. The pages were set up as just a huge wall of text. Not easy to read at all, even though I really enjoy Jones's prose.

I'm interested in checking out F.D.'s other works after I finish C&P. Anyone have any recommendations?
Slow reader here. I'm reading with my tablet. 10 pages every night or every other day. Tips on how to be good in reading?
I find that when I am easily distracted, it becomes much harder to digest what I am reading. I don't have my phone near me to encourage looking at it. I also do my best to sit still because when I'm fidgeting or moving around, I notice I stop absorbing information and have to re-read sections. If you keep reading consistently your pace will probably speed up a bit.

Tim Ferris has a video on Youtube on how to speed-read, but I've never tried it myself, so I can't vouch for its effectiveness.
 
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