What are you currently reading?

Hindu Man

Sparrow
Since the lockdown began in March 2020, I haven't read anything. I have all the free time in the world, but for some reason, I do not have the motivation.

Sometime in summer 2020, I will read at least 1 book, hopefully.
 
I recently read "The Warrior Who Carried Life," by Geoff Ryman. This is a strange but fantastic fantasy novel, about a young woman who takes on the demonic forces of her world. What makes it so original is that the story of Adam and Eve is a crucial component of the plot. And how Adam was utilized was different, to say the least. This is not your usual LOTR inspired tale.
 
The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible
https://www.amazon.com/Unseen-Realm-Recovering-Supernatural-Worldview/dp/1683592719
During these tense times, I am actively trying to reach out to family members, immediate and extended. Turns out one of my Uncles has gone down the Orthodox theology road and is ahead of me!! So pumped. We share the same Protestant roots. He recommended checking out Heiser, and I said that I thought I heard Jay Dyer mention Heiser and sure enough..
So, this book just arrived today on his recommendation. Just cracked it open
 

Spartan85

Pigeon
I
The Unseen Realm: Recovering the Supernatural Worldview of the Bible
https://www.amazon.com/Unseen-Realm-Recovering-Supernatural-Worldview/dp/1683592719
During these tense times, I am actively trying to reach out to family members, immediate and extended. Turns out one of my Uncles has gone down the Orthodox theology road and is ahead of me!! So pumped. We share the same Protestant roots. He recommended checking out Heiser, and I said that I thought I heard Jay Dyer mention Heiser and sure enough..
So, this book just arrived today on his recommendation. Just cracked it open
I think you should read Ivan Iliyin. He was an Orthodox Christian philosopher.
 
I'm currently reading, "Entrepreneur- 5pm to 9am," by Kanth Miriyala and Reethika Sunder. A very cool and personable primer on starting up a small business. I highly recommend it.

And amazingly, it is not available on Amazon! Lol I bought it here in the Philippines, and it has an Indian publisher. I paid only $2 for it.
 

Timothy Crow

Sparrow
In 2 days will be reading Might Is Right by Ragnar Redbeard. Heard many a good things about it and though it wasn't cheap to track down the most accurate edition I am actually excited about my book reading as I have been.
I'm a slow reader and will report back with a brief synopsis as I progress.
It is worth the read, a bit harsh at times but then hey, it is mostly truthful. I found a copy online and downloaded it. Hope you enjoy it.
 

Timothy Crow

Sparrow
Currently reading Dokkodo by Miyamoto Musashi. It is in fact just a few short lines but the book is full of commentary by various other people, most of whom just view the author as a psychopath and out of touch. The original lines are full of wisdom, the commentary not so much. Overall though I enjoy it.
 

Matianus

Sparrow
I am reading Christ The Lord by Anne Rice. Generally, I am not a fan of Gothic fiction and I would not touch her mass-market books about vampires; however, she recently became a devout Catholic, and this series paints an interesting picture of the life of Jesus before the gospels. Of note is how she portrays the Virgin Mary with such feminine and gentle grace.

For those of you who have read Dostoevsky, which of his novels do you recommend reading first?
 

Lace em up

Woodpecker
Just finished "The Stranger in the Woods" by Micheal Finkel. Its about a guy who becomes a hermit and lives in the woods of northern Maine for 27 years without contact with anyone, except a hiker who surprised him and he said "hi" to 7 years into his isolation.

What was really odd was he made his camp in a densely wooded area with houses and summer houses and camps all around and he stole everything he needed for 27 years. Thats fucking nuts. He was discovered in 2013.

Also finished "All American Murder" by James Patterson. Aaron Hernandez was a fucked up individual. Hard hits to the head, hard drugs and gangs... not a good combination kids.

Just started "Oil !" by Upton Sinclair and so far its been a page turner. Not sure if Ive read any of his books before but I like his writing style.
 

denj

Pigeon
I read Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming. I study programming in college and this book very useful for me. Sometimes I also use service for python homework help to save my time. Hope with their help I'll finally get a degree next year.
 
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1. Teemestari-kirja [A Journal Of A Tea Ceremony Master] by Emmi Itäranta. A nice post-ap sci-fi by a Finnish writer telling a story from a world where the water was gone, thus having become a really valuable asset.

2. Trout Fishing in America by Richard Brautigan (1967)

3. Vajra Speech by Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche (2001)

4. Dropping Ashes On The Buddha by a Zen master Seung Sahn & Stephen Mitchell (ed.), (1976)

5. Korean Made Easy by Billy Go (2014)

6. Yorùbá Yé Mi [A Beginning Yoruba Textbook] by Fehintola Mosandomi, 2014, an online publication

7. Ivan Vassilyevich Menyayet Professiyu [Mr Ivan the Terrible Taking Up A New Trade] by Mikhail Bulgakov, an online publication

8. 160 lessons of Persian by a certain Hassan H (cover missing, a file was published online)
 

Jaszczurka

Sparrow
Just finished: Space Relations: A slightly gothic interplanetary tale, by Bob Barr (father of Bill Barr, former headmaster of Jeffrey Epstein.)

I'm a bit disappointed in that I expected some weird sh** considering it was billed as interplanetary slavery and had an erotic prelude but it turned out to be old-fashioned sci-fi adventure. Nonetheless, it was a fun read particularly knowing who the author was and his relations and particularly in the current political climate.
 
In 2 days will be reading Might Is Right by Ragnar Redbeard. Heard many a good things about it and though it wasn't cheap to track down the most accurate edition I am actually excited about my book reading as I have been.
I'm a slow reader and will report back with a brief synopsis as I progress.
Might is Right, from a Christian perspective, dramatically oversimplifies (and often outright misrepresents) the basic tenets of Christianity, and is at times utterly blasphemous. I wouldn't recommend it to any of my fellow Catholics. That being said, I enjoyed reading it - Mr. Redbeard has a profound understanding of the historical impact of natural law ("tooth and claw"), and there are few (short, polemical) books that better put to bed the Egalitarian Mythos.

As to what I'm reading, a lot these days!
  • G.K. Chesterton's Orthodoxy
  • Aajonus Vonderplanitz's The Primal Diet
  • Dr. William Trebing's Good-bye Germ Theory
  • Naturally Healthy Goats (Reference Guide)
  • Patrick Wood's Technocracy: The Hard Road to World Order
As far as fiction, I read a smattering of public domain pulp authors - R.E. Howard, Clark Ashton Smith, Algernon Blackwood, etc., all of which can be found for free online (here, here, & here). Highly recommend checking those links out - there is such a trove of fantastic works out there just languishing in the public domain, a totally different class of authors that just don't exist in any meaningful numbers today. I also recently picked up a few boxes of old sci-fi & fantasy from the 60s & 70s for $20, so I power through those every now and then when I need a break.

And I just purchased Bishop Athanasius Schneider's Christus Vincit, but it won't come in for another week or so, at which time I'll be dropping everything for that.
 
Buddhism in Central Asia by B. N. Puri, ed. by Alex Wayman, 1997
Buddhism in Iran: An Anthropological Approach to Traces and Indluences by Mostafa Vaziri, 2012
Learn Hindi through English by Dr. N. Sreedharan, and online file with unknown publishing data
Islam and Buddhism by Harun Yahya, transl. by Ron Evans, 2003
 
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