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Knight.of.Logos

Woodpecker
Orthodox Catechumen
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nagareboshi

Woodpecker
"Two Paths: Orthodoxy And Catholicism" by Michael Whelton. Can't recommend this book enough to Orthodox, Catholics, and Protestants alike.

Good book, thanks for the recommendation. I appreciate the writer for including his own self-introduction and biography, which adds context to his spiritual journey; so many writers fail to do it these days. Some highlights from the book which are worthy to think about.

Pope Leo XIII, Satis Cognitum; papal supremacy is the vunerable and constant belief of every age recognized always and everywhere and by all. The claims are jure divino which means the bishops of Rome had universal jursidiction and infallible teaching even from the very beginning. It asserts that this is not an innovation or a gradual development. "As to the nature and authority of the primary of the Roman pontiff, no newly conceived opinion is set forth, but the venerable and constant belief of every age."

St. Ambrose of Milan:
- Faith is the foundation of the Church, for it was not of the person but of the faith of St. Peter that it was said that the gates of hell shall not prevail against it; it is the confession of faith that has vanquished hell. Jesus Christ is the Rock. He did not deny the grace of His name when He called him Peter, because he borrowed from the rock the constancy and solidity of his faith. Endeavor then, thyself to be a rock - thy rock is thy faith, and faith is the foundation of the Church.

Pope St. Victor tried to excommunicate the bishops of Asia because of a calendar dispute, recorded by Eusebius, but he was rebuked:
- This was not to the taste of all the bishops: they replied with a request that he would turn his mind to the things that make for peace and unity and love towards his neighbors.

St. Jerome:
- Christ is the Rock Who granted to His apostles that they should be called Rock. God has founded His Church on this Rock and it is from this Rock that Peter has been named.
St. Augustine:
- He [Peter] had not the primacy over the disciples but among the disciples.

St. John Crysostom:
- Observe how Peter does everything with the common consent; nothing imperiously.

From the author himself:
- The early Church was overwhelmingly Eastern and Greek. They had the greatest population density and its people were better educated and more sophisticated than their Western brethren. The East could claim 44 churches of apostolic origin versus one for the West. The West was not the center of Christianity, but for many hundreds of years it was a missionary field. With the barbarian incursions it had become a cultural backwater. The East held four of the five patriarchates, i.e. Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem; two of these, Alexandria and Antioch, contained the first schools of biblical interpretation. The seven great ecumenical councils were all held in the East, with an overwhelming presence of Eastern bishops.
 

Viktor Zeegelaar

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm reading the book Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan by Fr. Spyridon. I will come back with an analysis after, but this appears to be the perfect alignment between (Orthodox) Christianity and its world view on good and evil as the core conflict and method for understanding our world in regard to the degeneracy, NWO elite plan and technocracy we see unfolding. I've just started but so far I'm pleased that Fr. Spyridon basically knows what we all know from the ''conspiracy'' realm. This is gonna be exciting.
 

GuitarVH

Kingfisher
Orthodox Inquirer
I'm reading the book Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan by Fr. Spyridon. I will come back with an analysis after, but this appears to be the perfect alignment between (Orthodox) Christianity and its world view on good and evil as the core conflict and method for understanding our world in regard to the degeneracy, NWO elite plan and technocracy we see unfolding. I've just started but so far I'm pleased that Fr. Spyridon basically knows what we all know from the ''conspiracy'' realm. This is gonna be exciting.

Good book.
 

William Faulkner

Sparrow
Orthodox
  • "Ariel's song" is a verse passage in Scene ii of Act I of The Tempest by William Shakespeare.
  • On the gravestone of Shelley in the Protestant Cemetery in Rome the lines “Nothing of him that doth fade, / But doth suffer a sea-change / Into something rich and strange.” are engraved. His schooner, on which he sailed the day he drowned, was called ‘Ariel’.

Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes;
Nothing of him that doth fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell:
Ding-dong.
Hark! now I hear them — Ding-dong, bell.
 

Pioneer

Sparrow
I finished My Daily Bread and have begun reading My Meditation on the Gospel. Both books are part of My Confraternity Library which is a series of 6 books total. Excellent books that have helped me grow in my faith and assisted in my walk with Christ!
Excellent recommendation. I rediscovered My Daily Bread recently after many years and right now I’m trying to get in the habit of prayerfully reading a chapter every day to help me grow in the spiritual life. I also love the “Confraternity” edition of Imitation of Christ with those wonderful illustrations.
 

Tippy

Woodpecker
I'm currently reading 'Dead Bat in Paraguay' by Roosh. Pretty interesting read. I have experienced similar feelings when travelling and you almost never read about this or hear these thoughts expressed by people on the subject. This cult that travel is amazing, life changing, the meaning of life itself - never something I agreed with. I mostly remember being incredibly lonely and isolated and anxious and Roosh captures that perfectly. Unlike me though, Roosh really put himself out there and tried basically everything socially and dating wise yet still had those feelings.

When he finally experiences some pleasures of the flesh, it hardly comes across as victorious or worth months of food poisoning and what sounds like utterly depressing nights out in clubs with strangers. Never mind the fact he uprooted his entire life, including 2 girlfriends back home, to do this. I found it admirable and yes it reminded me of my own bizarre draw to wanderlust, like a moth to the light. We think it's what we need, but it isn't. It's just something extreme and different that we think MUST alter us in some way - it's a drastic measure so surely it will have drastic results. Yes and no. Sure, now we are forced to worry about delayed flights, getting mugged and finding random sights, it at least distracts us briefly from existential angst. But as Tony Soprano said, there is no geographical solution to an emotional problem.The deeper problems just get inflamed by it. Especially once you realise that your idea of what the trip would be - some glorious movie like transformation - is actually this experience of stress and angst that you can't wait to be over so you can add it to your self-image list of reasons you're an interesting dude.

It isn't all bad of course - it's just how life is. A ton of frustration and misery but in between that there are moments of connection or opportunities for learning that perhaps make it worthwhile afterall.


It's compelling to read this in the context of knowing how he would evolve later as well. You can sense this yearning for something more than a shallow lifestyle. But he's unaware of how to access it or if it even exists. Even in these early Roosh writings you can see the seeds of what would later become faith.

Roosh is an extremist, that's for sure. No half-measures with this guy. I envy that in many respects since when I traveled, I didn't go all in. And even with my faith I still need to put more conscious work into cultivating my relationship with God.
 

stugatz

Pelican
I may have mentioned it on another thread, but I decided (as I am looking for work and have lots of idle time) to read Stephen King's The Stand back to back - abridged version first, then unabridged. I like both versions equally, so I want to see the nuts-and-bolts differences between them.

I read this book every five years or so. It seems like every time I get the urge to read it again, I'm at a difficult spot in my life - so as a result it means a lot to me. Am now a third of the way through the unabridged.

Even though King isn't a challenging author to read, I feel accomplished when I finish this doorstopper.
 

magaman

Woodpecker
Not currently reading but I ran into this one and I'm really thinking about ordering it. Looks like a good read! Anyone on here own this book?

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Gremlin

Robin
Finished Metaphysics of War by Julius Evola today.

Highly recommended book that explores one of the most important aspects of the ancient world and puts modernity into perspective.
 

Mark-David

Pigeon
I just finished American Pilgrim, and thought it was excellent and (unexpectedly) very moving, and also Father Spyridon Bailey's "Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan" which was good but would have been significantly better with footnotes. (I'm Protestant, not Orthodox, but this didn't hinder my enjoyment of the book at all).

Right now I'm reading Diarmaid MacCulloch's "A History of Christianity" for non-fiction, and when I want some down-time I've been reading a collection of Flannery O'Connor's short stories.
 
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