What are you currently reading?

Bizet

Woodpecker
Far From the Maddening Crowd - Thomas Hardy

This Victorian-era romance novel is not something I'd usually read, but I'm glad I picked it up. It's set in rural England, and most the characters are farmers or shepherds. I'm really enjoying the vivid descriptions of country life. Reading this book is really motivating me to move out of the city.
 

Sanctus

Pigeon
I am currently reading The Health Hazards of Homosexuality, an eye-opening series of studies and anecdotes that show just how dangerous and wrong the homosexual life is. I suggest everyone read it.
I've linked it here for anyone who is interested. Warning, it is a grim book and not for those who find such sordid details hard to read.
 
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Sanctus

Pigeon
I'm studying the orthodox study bible. The two big take aways I have after first reading the New Testament and now the Old Testament are these: 1. the Old and the New Testament are so much in line, I hear Christ speaking in the Old... this is contrary to the idea I had that the Old was full of an angry God etc, but the overarching message is one of sin, repentance and forgiveness throughout all of it. 2. I realize that our whole society and the direction we're put on from birth are to put you away from this message (aka THE TRUTH) and into the hands of sin, slavery and Satan. Most telling I found Proverbs ''Trust in God, lean not on your own understanding'' contrasted to what we've been told and what is the core message of this society ''Trust in yourself, lean on your own experience''. It's a trap, a setup, a calculated one. I do feel my whole world view coming together as I finish the last pages
I purchased this last week and have begun reading it. So far so good.
 

stugatz

Pelican
I'm studying the orthodox study bible. The two big take aways I have after first reading the New Testament and now the Old Testament are these: 1. the Old and the New Testament are so much in line, I hear Christ speaking in the Old... this is contrary to the idea I had that the Old was full of an angry God etc, but the overarching message is one of sin, repentance and forgiveness throughout all of it. 2. I realize that our whole society and the direction we're put on from birth are to put you away from this message (aka THE TRUTH) and into the hands of sin, slavery and Satan. Most telling I found Proverbs ''Trust in God, lean not on your own understanding'' contrasted to what we've been told and what is the core message of this society ''Trust in yourself, lean on your own experience''. It's a trap, a setup, a calculated one. I do feel my whole world view coming together as I finish the last pages
Are Orthodox Bibles particularly hard to find in English? This is the only one I know of. I've always wanted to own one (I have a Catholic Douay-Rhiems and a Protestant King James with the Catholic books in an "Apocrypha" section).

Looks like (quick Amazon glance) the Old Testament in this is from the Septuagint, when KJV is Masoretic and Douay-Rhiems is Vulgate. The New Testament is just a King James reprint. Interesting that there are so many sources with the different versions.
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
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So far, Updike's prose is excellent.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I'm reading several theology books by the Cappadocian Fathers. Often hard to understand but St. Basil and St. Gregory Nazianzen have clearer prose than St. Gregory of Nyssa most of the time, which helps me grasp what they're saying. Ton of analogies and it's like heavy lifting for the mind.
 

fireshark

Woodpecker
Orthodox Inquirer
Finished EMJ's "Logos Rising" and Eric Voegelin's "Modernity Without Restraint" the other day.

Now I'm reading:

Progress and Religion - Christopher Dawson

The Jewish Revolutionary Spirit - EMJ

Anamnesis - Eric Voegelin
 

Cervantes

Woodpecker
Woman
Just finished reading "The Seven Caves" by Carleton Coon.

This is an anthropologist's account of digging seven caves looking for paleolithic sites. He's trying to find evidence for where modern humans might have originated from. The theory is that early Europe was populated by neanderthal people that get replaced by modern humans about 30k years ago. And that the first wave of early modern humans (Aurignac culture) was later replaced by neolithic people.

There have been four major glaciations in the last 10 million years. The most recent one lasted about one million years and had within it 4 periods of ice advancing and 3 periods where the ice retreated temporarily. This was the period when early humans evolved as populations of early human-like animals moved north and south with the ice. The most recent glaciation lasted from about 110k until about 11k years ago. Each time sea levels rise, animals move and human populations move around. When the same caves are occupied later the people and cultures are different. And when new people move in the question is where did they come from?

The great majority of the explored caves in the early 20th century were in Europe and the near east. Coon got the idea to dig in previously unexplored places deep in the deserts of Syria, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq and Afghanistan. The book is an interesting account of each expedition and what they found.

The account is partly about what was found at each cave and its scientific interpretation, and partly an account of the trip itself, how they got there, who they hired, the problems they had. In this way its is also a window into the virile world of Indiana Jones type archaeologists. It is an interesting book and worth reading.

Coon has been largely discredited as a "racist" in modern times by jewish "Boasian" anthropology, which is why I was interested in reading him. Coon was a student of Hooten at Harvard back when it was still allowed to make the same kinds of physiological observations about living populations as you would about historical ones.

Opposing this school was the jewish 'tabula rasa' school of anthropology founded by (((Franz Boas))), who popularized the false idea that culture and not race determine behavior. Boas was also the founder of "cultural relativism" - the claim that cultures cannot be classified as more or less advanced. Today Boas is known as the "father of modern anthropology", a field where "scientific" studies must follow jewish political imperatives and generally cannot be reproduced. Coon is essentially one of the last real anthropologists.

A major opponent of Coons was Boas' student (((Israel Ehrenberg))) aka "Ashley Montagu" is largly responsible for destroying Coon's reputation. Some of Ehrenberg's published writings are to lol: "Man's most dangerous myths: the fallacy of race" and "the natural superiority of women".
 

randallv

Pigeon
Nyet, he is an Orthodox Christian, he was a Catholic I believe. I like his blog and the book.
I haven't been on here in a quite a while. I wasn't sure how he exercised his faith, so thanks for the clarification. His blog posts can be a bit long winded, but what he has to say is usually relevant, imho.
 

Eusebius Erasmus

Pelican
Orthodox
I'm reading the Orthodox Christian novel Icon by Georgia Briggs:


It takes place in a future America, in which religion is completely outlawed. Even people's names are changed to comply with the new anti-religious laws (eg. Michael becomes 'Carter').

The story follows a 12-year-old girl named Euphrosyne who is living through this dystopian nightmare. She is an Orthodox Christian, struggling to make it in an aggressively secular world.

So far it's a well-written and thoughtful book for teens. I found myself close to tearing up at moments.

My minor criticism is that if this is meant to be prophetic, the author is not accurate in her assessment: in the future, there will be a religion, but it shall be a state-directed one which includes ecumenism as its driving force -- some churches will end up complying.

However I can highly recommend the novel, and it is good to support Orthodox writers.
 

TheMaleBrain

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I have recently read Altered Carbon.
Yes, I wanted to know what the hype was about.

Altered_Carbon_cover_1_%28Amazon%29.jpg


The basic premise is simple: 500 years into the future, humankind has spread throughout the galaxy, monitored by the watchful eye of the U.N. (called While divisions in race, religion, and class still exist, advances in technology have redefined life itself. Now, assuming one can afford the expensive procedure, a person's consciousness can be stored in a cortical stack at the base of the brain and easily downloaded into a new body (or “sleeve”) making death nothing more than a minor blip on a screen.

One would think that having your everlasting soul (or proxy of) available for endless living will bring heaven on earth. Guess again.
Richard K. Morgan shows us. via the protagonist Takeshi Kovacs - a half Japanese, half eastern European decent - what life will look like in such a scenario. Not looking good at all. It is a detective story of the classic Film Noir, but with one of the highest body counts one have read about. The author does not shy away from torture (Yes, imagine if you can revive someone and continue to torture him for life, or do it to his consciousness in cyberspace) and other forms of violence. Oh, did I mention the sex scenes?

We are talking about a good book, a very good one. Not because of violence, but because of consistency, rhythm, great writing and message - Living forever is hell.
 
elementary.jpg


The Elementary Particles by Michel Houellebecq is a novel that has profoundly affected me. The interconnected “manosphere,” “new right,” and “dark enlightenment” circles all owe much to the ideas Houellebecq puts forth in this text. Houllebecq's worldview is difficult to pin down under one ideological umbrella, so I will attempt to isolate and identify its various components:

*critical of modernity and leftism
*deeply influenced by scientific thought though interested in philosophy and spirituality
*pessimistic and keenly aware of human frailty
*angry at times, hopeful at others
*obsessively concerned with the nature of human sexuality and the aging process

The Elementary Particles tells the story of two half-brothers, Bruno and Michel. Abandoned by their idiotic mother who eschewed all responsibility toward her children in order to lead a new age bohemian lifestyle in the early 1960s, the two brothers grow up separately from each other, both experiencing various forms of tragedy in their adolescence. Bruno becomes a painfully neurotic hedonist, obsessed by sexual pleasure and generally bitter towards life, while Michel develops into an emotionless research scientist that experiences no pleasure or feelings of love.

If this sounds like bleak material, it most certainly is, but Houellebecq leavens the grim content with his wicked sense of humor, proving that the line between tragedy and comedy is indeed fine. The intersecting fates of the two brothers are fascinating, ultimately culminating in a scientific breakthrough by Michel that alters the course of humanity. The Elementary Particles is unique in that Houellbecq's erudite asides lend it the weight of a philosophy text. Everything from the overlap in the ideologies of brothers Julian and Aldous Huxley, the sociological inevitability of the Manson murders and similar crimes, the sexual marketplace (a concept liberally borrowed by writers in the seduction community), and quantum mechanics is discussed at length, and in a manner that is both informative and compelling. The absence of political correctness in Houllebecq's writing is immensely refreshing; everyone from women to hippies to Muslims may find something to be upset about here. A must read, in other words.
With Houellebecq it is like with Dostoyevski, he just cannot write. He has valid things to say, but no talent. They are like nervous high school kids, near a mental breakdown and no actual discipline. There is not a single well written passage in their works. Very "modern" authors, like Jackson Pollock is modern art. Flaubert, Tolstoi, Proust, Velazquez, Rubens are actual artists, because they master high style.
 
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IMMImedia

Sparrow
Just started reading Dandy in the underworld again, after reading it halfway through in 2013 or sumding. Autobiography by Sebastian Hoarsley. A flamboyant homosexual drugaddict public figure from the UK. Painter, writer, comic, etc. I was shopping around online, looking for countries that performed crucifixtions, checking rules, regulations, etc. And then I came over a video where this person was filmed during his crucifiction followed by him falling of the cross. I found out that it was very hard to get a crucification theese days, just available in some far away countries, and some of them are not open for tourists. Indonesia and malaysia and some other muslim countries seems to be the few options out there.

Anyway, cannot really give a summary about the book, since everything he valued and did in life, is against roosh's rules. He passed away 2 years after this book. It is an interesting read. Very funny.
 
Just started reading Dandy in the underworld again, after reading it halfway through in 2013 or sumding. Autobiography by Sebastian Hoarsley. A flamboyant homosexual drugaddict public figure from the UK. Painter, writer, comic, etc. I was shopping around online, looking for countries that performed crucifixtions, checking rules, regulations, etc. And then I came over a video where this person was filmed during his crucifiction followed by him falling of the cross. I found out that it was very hard to get a crucification theese days, just available in some far away countries, and some of them are not open for tourists. Indonesia and malaysia and some other muslim countries seems to be the few options out there.

Anyway, cannot really give a summary about the book, since everything he valued and did in life, is against roosh's rules. He passed away 2 years after this book. It is an interesting read. Very funny.
Do you mean crucifixion? There are annual crucifixions in the Phillippines; it's a festival.
 

IMMImedia

Sparrow
Do you mean crucifixion? There are annual crucifixions in the Phillippines; it's a festival.
yes, typo, english is my fifth language, not my native tongue. Dunno how I could have gotten it so wrong. Yes, phillipines too. But tourists are not allowed anymore. Several reasons, make a mockery of the tradition. Making commerce of rituals is bad too. And you get a strain on hospitals when people do this and get infection and stuff. So they regulated it a bit. And it is far to the philipines for me, a 15hour flight or something, I live in europe, lots of getting on and of different flights, and it costs a fortune. I was and am not a rich man, and travel is stress. Was hoping there was a catholic country in europe that did it, like armenia or poland, bujt no, bad luck
 
yes, typo, english is my fifth language, not my native tongue. Dunno how I could have gotten it so wrong. Yes, phillipines too. But tourists are not allowed anymore. Several reasons, make a mockery of the tradition. Making commerce of rituals is bad too. And you get a strain on hospitals when people do this and get infection and stuff. So they regulated it a bit. And it is far to the philipines for me, a 15hour flight or something, I live in europe, lots of getting on and of different flights, and it costs a fortune. I was and am not a rich man, and travel is stress. Was hoping there was a catholic country in europe that did it, like armenia or poland, bujt no, bad luck
Armenia is not catholic, if you mean roman, they are armenian apostolic, which is oriental orthodox; they have a slightly different Christology regarding the two natures than romans, greeks, calvinists, lutherans etc. I am Lutheran, and if you want, we can meet up and build a cross and i nail you on it, if you sign a paper, that you won't sue me no matter what. But probably i would not do it, because i consider it nonsensical. In the phillippines they also flog themselves, which is regarded heretical since medieval times in roman catholicism and we lutherans are against that merit-based stuff in general. I think, there is no major branch of Christianity that is actually okay with these things.
We are in the wrong thread anyway. I don't know, if the rules allow to go that far off the thread's topic.
 

IMMImedia

Sparrow
Just countries thrown out, am not 100% in the know about each country and their statereligion or dominant one, just random. Guess it came bacause Jesus spoke arameic, and I perhaps thought that came from armenia. Which is probably wrong too. I am no christian expert, I just lived in hellish situation personally about 10 years ago, and wanted to test myself to the max, and shopped around for crucifixtion. Or wanted to numb my psycic torment. Was in a bad relationship. Was an atheist at that point, do not claim it to be well thoughtt through or nothing, was just something I wanted to do then. Never been a christian in my life till later, was a registered buddhist at the time I think, I de-enrolled from the church at 18, because I had to go through confirmation despite not believing, and having social anxiety. So I became very hateful of the church, I did not like going through confirmation doing public speaking in front oiff 200 people, and did not like lying about pledging my life to God when I did not believe. Tried to talk to my parents and grandmother about it, but the conversation was not entertained, this was a must. So I resented them for a while after that. Especially my parents, who I do believe are atheists. Hypocritical to go through a phony ritual they do not believe in. So I joined a faith who pays you 50 bucks a year instead, when I found out that the statechurch ignored my written resignation. Then I became a buddhist to block that membership. Now I am back. I do not know the book, just heard people speak of it, pro and against. I was a diciple of Christopher Hitchens for most of my life. Why are you being so intellectual about this? I do not know what branch of christianity I should be in, it is quite new to me, I am learning as we speak. It has only been like 5 years, I do not pray, I cannot define it, just a feeling it is right. And lutheran is wrong, that is the statechurch of my country. They are not allowed to preach about hell no more, nor say that homosexuality or infidelity is wrong, and they have LESBYAHN priests marrying gay couples, so that one is out. I think they have stopped preaching against abortion too, which is very wrong. The faith is no more. If everything goes, it cease to be a religion, mkay?

Why are you saying you would build a cross and nail me yourself? When you state you would not do it? You just preach anger, possibly without knowing it, and saying to people you are a fake christian. Why would you do that? Because I gave an explenation for reading a bonkers book? Why so emotional? I just did the introductionthing and told people of a book I got when I was in a weird place, why did it evoke anger in you? It was past feelings I had, they are gone now, the book is still interesting and something you should read to get to know people that are hard to understand. not doing that project anymore, just saying I am reading again for the first time in 5-10 years. If you think. you help people by calling their thoughts stoopid, you have something to learn, and if you have to add your moral/ethical superiority that you would not do it, then you are just guilty of dantes 7 sins, and got a long way to go reaching the lord, if that is your plan. You have pride, that is a sin, a big one. Forget your ego, stop stroking it, you have it, stop jerking it once in a while. I know selfgratification is fun, but in this regard, you must let others do it for you, this is not like your joystick Your ego must be built by others, not yourself. Good luck buddy.
 
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