What are you currently reading?

BasedBaker

Robin
Trad Catholic
Would anyone recommend reading Windswept House and The Jesuits by Fr. Malachi Martin in order or would it matter at all? Been watching some interviews with him and he seems very interesting and based.
 

DTJG

Chicken
Trad Catholic
Would anyone recommend reading Windswept House and The Jesuits by Fr. Malachi Martin in order or would it matter at all? Been watching some interviews with him and he seems very interesting and based.
'Windswept House's is a must read. It's description of how the NWO goes about driving their agenda at all levels from policy to personnel is excellent.

The battle between the factions inside the Church is also well presented.

As an aside, I asked a very based priest (who spent considerable time in Rome) his thoughts on Malachi Martin and the book overall. He has not only read it and agreed as to its contents, but volunteered that he is close with a priest who knew Martin very well in NY. This priest has zero doubts about the nature and timing of his passing, and that the rumours of the manuscript to the sequel having disappeared are valid.

I have not read 'The Jesuits'.
 

DavidKnight

Pigeon
Catholic
Regarding Evola, I wasn't a huge fan of Revolt Against the Modern World despite all the hype. That said, Eros is a very fascinating look at different cultural attitudes towards modesty and relationships.
 

Radoste

Sparrow
Other Christian
The Idiot but I just cannot get my teeth into it. I have read the train opening 4 times and I just can't lock in on it.
I actually got completely hooked by The Idiot, starting on a Friday night and finishing on Monday morning. Right after the prince gets off the train, you start to get some scenes that immediately flesh out the prince's character, introduce the most important characters, and set up the plot elements which pull you in for the rest of the novel.
 

Chicago Talk Show Host

Chicken
Catholic
Happy Sunday everybody,

I'm in the middle of a few books, but one I'm currently hacking away at is none other than Libido Dominandi. I was referred to it by Roosh after finding out more about EMJ around 2017-ish. It was also around that time that I found Roosh and his Roosh Hour series. 'Been around ever since.

It's with a sense of sincerity, rather than self-promotion that I'd like to share with you part one of my book review on it. It's on my YT channel, and I do hope you check it out. I also reviewed Roosh's American Pilgrim book, and Degenerate Moderns by EMJ among others.

Happy reading, enjoy your Sunday, and stay well friends.
 

paulag

Chicken
Protestant
Light Perpetual by Francis Spufford

In 1944, a German V2 rocket struck a London Woolworths, killing 168 civilians, 15 of whom were under age 12. That’s what really happened. This radiant, symphonic novel imagines otherwise, picking up the lives of five (fictional) child victims of the bombing, and revisiting them at 15-year intervals as they grow up and old in the last half of the 20th century. A bit like Michael Apted’s Up documentary series, I'm excited to finally get around to this novel
 

Sevomoz

Pigeon
Catholic
Morgoth did a video about a series of books Warhammer books he was reading called the Horus Heresy (link to video transcript). I prefer fiction and usually stick to the classics. I think, like Morgoth, from time to time it's good to see what "normal" books are like.

I'm up to book five and it's an engrossing read. It's dark world and a complicated tale. Religious elements come into the book. It's very masculine. Fantasy books needn't be The Hunger Games. It's much more sophisticated and better written than other modern sci-fi/fantasy books I've read.
 

Maddox

Woodpecker
Protestant
7189SFT92BL._SX334_BO1,204,203,200_.gif
 

Galaxy_Traveler

Robin
Other Christian
Just finished The Man In The High Castle. Kinda boring alternative history in all honesty. Most interesting part was Germans draining the Mediterranean Sea to expand Europe. It's also implied that they depopulated Sub-Saharan Africa for political and economic reasons.
The novels of Philip K. Dick have that in common, usually a very compelling concept but very boring to read. From Total Recall to Minority report, he must be the most film adapted author ever, it speaks to his vision but his books are a difficult read due to his somewhat boring style.
 

Galaxy_Traveler

Robin
Other Christian
Started reading 'The Brothers Karamazov' by Dostoyevsky. The book scared me due to its length of more than a thousand pages, I had it on my shelf for years and never touched it. I'm only 150 pages in but it's a great read so far, Dostoyevsky's narrative Style is compelling enough to hook the reader over long stretches, and it is written in a way that keeps a constant level of tension. Reading this is one of my new year resolutions, glad I finally got to start it, it's a lot more compelling to read so far than I imagined.
 

Mackerel snapper

 
Banned
Trad Catholic
Would anyone recommend reading Windswept House and The Jesuits by Fr. Malachi Martin in order or would it matter at all? Been watching some interviews with him and he seems very interesting and based.
Please listen to this:


Malachi Martin is a confirmed “double agent” and infiltrator. He was a con-man:

The file on Malachi Martin:

The truth about Malachi Martin: https://novusordowatch.org/2013/12/truth-about-malachi-martin/

EMJ has whole chapter on Malachi Martin in Jewish Revolutionary Spirit. Avoid!
 
Last edited:

OrthoSerb

Robin
Orthodox
I'm reading On Prayer by St Sophrony. I recently finished We Shall See Him As He Is, also by St Sophrony.

I appreciate how St Sophrony weaves together practical advice on the spiritual life with theology.
 
Top