What book changed your life?

mojo

Pigeon
Joshua - a modern day Christian parable
by Joseph F. Girzone, a former priest

“God has graced you with many gifts, and you are very dear to Him, because you allow Him to use you as a partner in the work He has planned for your life.”

A man named Joshua moves to a small cabin on the edge of town. The locals are mystified by his quiet simplicity...he seems to seek nothing for himself. He supports himself by working as a carpenter, charging very little for his services, and his craftsmanship is exquisite. His way of being inspires both amazement and concern from the locals.

Joshua is benevolent and kind, humble and pure. In this world but not of it.
A very wholesome read.

 

komatiite

Pelican
Gold Member
Can I ask a dumb question. I want to start understanding Christianity but I have no idea where to start in terms of the Bible. What one do i get? There are all these variations — King James Version, Old Testament, New Testament. Any links or old threads that can help? Thanks in advance!!
 

Thomas More

Hummingbird
http://www.saintjonah.org/articles/translations.htm

This article discusses the pros and cons of different translations, in terms of accuracy and readability. They don't come right out and recommend one over the others, but based on the article, I think the New King James Version comes out as the best version for a first bible.

The article praises the original King James Version very highly, as not only one of the most accurate ever done into English, but also very beautiful as well. However, the archaic wording is quite different from standard English, and there are a lot of examples where the English of that day has a far different meaning than what a modern person would initially think it means.

I initially was going to recommend the New International Version, and I still think it's pretty good. However, this article points out a few places where the translation shows bias, and the NKJV seems to be better in this area, while still having some beauty to the wording.
 
Paracelsus said:
Rich Dad Poor Dad.

But not the way you think.

Because after a few years of generally failing at implementing its "wisdom", I looked around to see if there was some sort of scam at work. That's when I found John T. Reed. And that's what introduced me to the Right. And that's what started helping me wake up.
Hah! I had to look up what you were talking about and found Reed's review. Really interesting and funny.

https://johntreed.com/blogs/john-t-...ert-t-kiyosakis-book-rich-dad-poor-dad-part-1
 

Davidovich

Sparrow
Gold Member
The Key, by Whitley Strieber, has changed my life more than any other book.

It's a unique little book that has me re-reading it over and over. Strieber reports on a conversation he had with a stranger who barged into his hotel room in 1998. It was the most interesting conversation he ever had.

If the report is factual, and I think it is, to me personally it is the most important and interesting book I have ever read.

The Conversation and the Fragmentary Inclusions, and the Prophesy of the Key, are separate chapters which can be read in any order. I was skeptical, so I started with the Afterword. I worked up to the Conversation the next day.

Through studying this book, and meditating as directed by the Master of the Key, I lost all my fear of death. This enlightening and freedom from dread has been a huge relief to me. I'm really not my body. I'm a living spirit who temporarily inhabits a body.

In my life, I have nearly died several times though accidents and carelessness, and only survived through luck. Now without fear for myself, I'm glad to continue my mission in life as long as I can, accomplishing all the good that I can.
 

sbideo

Pigeon
Letting Go: The Pathway of Surrender David R Hawkins
It has helped with changing my mindset and taking ownership of where I am currently at in life.
 

Max Roscoe

Kingfisher
How I Found Freedom in an Unfree World by Harry Browne.
I think most of us went through a libertarian phase. While I reject most libertarianism today, and see it as a hedonistic and overly materialistic philosphy, I learned some important lessons in the book. One is that you create your own freedom. Don't try to change others; change your own reality. His chapter on marriage really confused me at the time, but it has some merit, although it is not congruent with my current belief in religious marriage. His ideas about rebellion and nonconformity are very relevant to the coronavirus lockdown today. His advice was to find out the rules, what the consequences of breaking them are, and how the rules are enforced. Browne would stress than instead of loudly proclaiming "I WILL NOT WEAR A MASK" or "I REFUSE TO TAKE YOUR VACCINE" that you find a quiet way of opting out, repeatedly "forgetting" to comply, and avoiding detection. Those that live under the radar can have the most freedom. Those that brag about it are targeted.
 
Unfortunately I have only read primarily mainstream books, so these two:

1.The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway in high school

2.The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho in college (undergrad)

Back in 2010-2011, I became obsessed with the The Secret & The Power by Rhonda Byrne and thought the concepts of the book would make me rich ($$) by "visualizing" money, but it never truly came into fruition. I felt cheated by Rhonda Byrne lol.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Unfortunately I have only read primarily mainstream books, so these two:

1.The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway in high school

2.The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho in college (undergrad)

Back in 2010-2011, I became obsessed with the The Secret & The Power by Rhonda Byrne and thought the concepts of the book would make me rich ($$) by "visualizing" money, but it never truly came into fruition. I felt cheated by Rhonda Byrne lol.
Paul Coelho is into the same kind of neo-kabbalist spiritual babble as Rhonda, it's low-grade modern spiritual fare for the masses. Also the main reason he is so successful.
 

bucky

Pelican
Paul Coelho is into the same kind of neo-kabbalist spiritual babble as Rhonda, it's low-grade modern spiritual fare for the masses. Also the main reason he is so successful.
I'm too snobby about literature to actually give Coehlo a try, but boy did Ukrainian chicks eat his stuff up when I lived there. I once spent an afternoon at the biggest open market in Kiev looking for a copy of Dostoevsky's Notes from the Underground in Russian and came up empty handed, but the Coehlo stuff was everywhere.
 
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Any advice on a book we can give to the younger kids? I have a nephew who is 12 years old and I was thinking to give him something in personal finance and savings, his parents aren't exactly the best when it comes to finances. I guess he is like most other kids these days, spends way to much time on their phone playing stupid games, so I would be really happy if I could make him read a book in this subject!
 
Any advice on a book we can give to the younger kids? I have a nephew who is 12 years old and I was thinking to give him something in personal finance and savings, his parents aren't exactly the best when it comes to finances. I guess he is like most other kids these days, spends way to much time on their phone playing stupid games, so I would be really happy if I could make him read a book in this subject!
Good luck on getting a 12 year old to read a book on finance. That said, Bachelor Pad Economics by Aaron Clarey.
 

SLV

Newbie
When I was around 10 years old, I selected 'The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13 3/4' from a library. Turns out, it's not really a children's book but I loved it, an extremely funny commentary on British working class life at the time. So some of the references may be a bit dated and lost on other nationalities.
 
Obviously not that easy getting a 12 year old to read about finance, but was hoping maybe it was something out there that could be easy to read for someone younger. Doesn't need to be so "deep", just learning about savings could go far I think.

It seems that no kids these days is reading anything at all outside of school, not even comics. If they dont read now, will they ever read anything by their own will?
 
It doesn't HAVE to be in finance, could ofcourse be something else, most important is that he might get some interest for books. I will check out the suggestions, thanks!
 
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