What books would you recommend young men read which aren't extremely controversial?

Lazuli Waves

Woodpecker
I may have the opportunity to recommend books on life skills to a group of young people (~18-22). There will be men in the group.

What books would you recommend young men read that aren't glaringly controversial. It can't be something that has a title like, "Why Feminism is a Hate Group for Female Supremacists" or it will never fly. It could potentially criticize feminism within, though.

But it could be about other things that aren't political, like stoicism.
 
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. I read it back in highschool, and I haven't gone a single day since then without using something I learned in the book. It's one of the few out of thousands that I've read which has had a concrete and lasting effect on my life. Marcus Aurelius teaches emotional resilience, and I can thank him for the fact that I didn't give up and eat a bullet a long time ago.
 

Kurgan

Kingfisher
For business, I would recommend Art of the Deal by Donald Trump. It goes into his mentality of doing business in New York in the 1980s (it was written in 1987). I noticed he always tended to have a positive attitude and he attributes it to his success. One of the key parts of the book was getting an ice rink built in a matter of days or weeks (can't recall now) in the heart of Central Park where the NYC government took months and years to get it off of the ground.
 

bucky

Ostrich
Meditations - Marcus Aurelius
1984 - George Orwell
Brave New World - Aldous Huxley
The Fountainhead - Ayn Rand

Good recommendations. I'd say start with Anthem with Rand though, then maybe We the Living. Best to start with the books where she was still writing characters that act like real human beings and don't feel like avatars for competing ideologies.
 
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius. I read it back in highschool, and I haven't gone a single day since then without using something I learned in the book. It's one of the few out of thousands that I've read which has had a concrete and lasting effect on my life. Marcus Aurelius teaches emotional resilience, and I can thank him for the fact that I didn't give up and eat a bullet a long time ago.

There's a book called "The Porch And The Cross" about the overlap between Stoicism and traditional Christianity. I think you'd dig it.
 

ElliotHL

Newbie
Read The Decameron by Giovani Boccaccio.
This book was written in 1350 soon after the Black Death in Italy.
It is about 10 young men and women who flee Florence and head to a manor in the country side, in 1348, to 'self quarantine' from the plague.
Each night one person in the group is crowned king or queen. The book is a collection of interesting stories about all sorts of topics. A great read to put everything in perspective.
 
The Compleate Gentleman, Brad Minor - great thing about books like this is that it references a lot of other books - a good 'gateway'
Iron Sharpens Iron G. Andrew Meschter well written, realistic short read about manhood.
Magnificent Obsession Loyd Douglass - this book is about a young playboy who turns his life around
The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt - the story of Theodore Roosevelt's early days before he was president - from sickly asthmatic moma's boy to rough rider.
 

Panegyric

Newbie
Since this is a Christian forum I thought it would be appropriate to recommend a Christian book. I would recommend “What The Bible Is All About” by Henrietta C. Mears published by Regal Books. It was first published in 1953 which I think is an important date. The book is meant to be read along with the bible but can be read stand alone although that would defeat the purpose for which it was written. The author breaks down all 66 books of the bible, highlights key events, and provides suggestions for daily bible reading for that particular book. There is very little political commentary apart from her observations of how far man has strayed from God’s word. This book is well written, concise, and timeless. Young men, get grounded in the word! Grab your bibles and read, and if you need some background and context, read “What the Bible is All About.” I think we are all mature enough to accept that the author is female. That is not the point nor does it diminish the fine work she put into it. I’ve been a believer since 1997 and have read the bible cover to cover a dozen times or more, and I still refer to Mears’ book. I highly recommend it. Blessings!
 
I recommend the following books for basic understanding of how the world works and how to be:

- The Holy Bible (full canon with all deuterocanonical writings)
- Judah's Sceptre and Joseph's Birthright -> read it before you read the Bible to make sense of the geneologies, which are more important than you think
- Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky -> describes the disturbances of the soul that occur when being isolated too long, especially in a life without God
- The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky -> shows the conflict between religion and socialism/atheism in a time of great changes in the Russian Empire
- This Time, The World by George Lincoln Rockwell -> autobiography of the founder of the American National Socialist Party, which shows the development of different generations and deadly campaigns of mainstream media outlets despite living in America; also, he is one of the last real men of the last century
- Love and Orgasm by Alexander Lowen -> psychological book about the dynamics of both sexes, how they harmonize and why there are so many dysfunctions in marriages and sexual relationships in general; describing in detail why homosexuality and lesbianism is a mental illness and why it is inferior to heterosexuality; explains not only the mechanical but also the spiritual component of sex; to make it short, there is no more red-pilled book on sexuality than this one and it was published in the height of the Sexual Revolution in 1965
 
- This Time, The World by George Lincoln Rockwell -> autobiography of the founder of the American National Socialist Party, which shows the development of different generations and deadly campaigns of mainstream media outlets despite living in America; also, he is one of the last real men of the last century
This one might, just might, fall under the category of extremely controversial. :D
 
Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly -- Bourdain's personal journey towards manhood.
The Naked Sun (Robot #2) -- A retro commentary on "social media"
The Marching Morons by CM Kornbluth (inspiration for Idiocracy/Robocop) (Having children is one of the best things an ethical person can do to make/keep the world a better place) ("I'd buy THAT for a dollar!")
Will: The Autobiography of G. Gordon Liddy -- If you want to change the world, or achieve personal success, you have to have will.
Troublemaker -- Leah Remini -- A story of how Leah grew into and escaped the Scientology cult and changed her worldview.
Banco (sequel to Papillon) by Henri Charriere -- This is more autobiographical rather than adventurous than Papillion but rather than escaping from prison, he goes through redemption abandoning revenge to becoming a family man.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
A decent start, but by no means a complete list of basic books on

Pactical Knowledge:

Cardone - Sell or Be Sold (maybe follow up with Robert Cialdini & Scott Adams persuasion books)
Navarro - What Every Body is Saying (follow up with any of his others).
Hill - Think and Grow Rich
Greene - 48 Laws of Power (the best of the series; the others aren't as good)
Donald Trump - The Art of the Deal and How to Get Rich (good rules in that second one)
Borudain - Kitchen Confidential - and a follow up job somewhere in a restaurant, at least for a summer somwhere.

LIterature:
Bukowski - Post Office (maybe also Women)
Anything by Delicious Tacos

Deep dive on how & why things are the way they are in America - the works of E Michael Jones (big books - start with a few videos)
 
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