What is Orthodox Christianity?

Sure we not supposed to be sleeping around and all that stuff obviously, but the hygiene? It used to be a law from God though back them why are you so against it though? It wasn't a punishment from God, im circumsized from birth & I have a great sex life with my wife I wish sometimes I was actually less sensitive, its just the outer skin thats removed not the nerves in your penis, certain laws are no longer valid like sacrificing animals for your sins & obviously circumcision some of these things were symbolic for Christ & now that Christ is here we dont go back to the symbols, the moral laws are still valid, there were even laws for sickness that are still valid today if a person is sick they supposed to be quarantined in todays world we have reversed it and quarantined the healthy. There are also good laws for countries & society and labor laws etc, as far as I can see its only the ceremonial laws that fall away the rest have great wisdom i them that I apply today, the one i still fall short on is the sabbath keep 1 day a week off which I kind of do but not 100% would like to learn more about it no other religion has it
 

josemiguel

Sparrow
Orthodox
Circumcision was the predecessor to baptism. The Hebrew practice of circumcision was far different than what it is today, it was practically just a nick. Christians are forbidden from practicing Judiasing practices including post 3rd century circumcision which didn't exist prior to 200 AD when the Jews who rejected Christ made the operation more severe.
 

SimpleMan

Sparrow
@Good_Shepherd

It never made sense to me why God would ask of this, while also saying not to cut ones body. Why make something perfect in His image, that would then have to altered?

How can one circumcise the foreskin of your heart?

Deuteronomy 10:16
Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

Etymology: Fore / skin
Bible references. : Circumcision / Circumcise

Genesis 17:11
And ye shall circumcise the flesh of your foreskin; and it shall be a token of the covenant betwixt me and you.

Etymology: Flesh
Of fruits from 1570s. Figurative use for "carnal nature, animal or physical nature of man" (Old English) is from the Bible, especially Paul's use of Greek sarx, and this led to sense of "sensual appetites" (c. 1200).

Jesus spoke in parables, so I'm still open to what is really meant about this.
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
Brothers, I'm not sure where to post this, but I'll try here.

The Father has stated that is permissible for me to take bread after communion. If I'm not mistaken it is leavened bread that has been blessed? I accepted it today after the Liturgy. (Serbian Orthodox)

Of course I understand that since I haven't converted, I am forbidden from communion.

Can you please explain how I'm able to accept the bread offering and the significance? The Father explained it a bit on Sunday, but I've lost the translation.

I'm a baby and have many questions, and while The Father has been extremely welcoming, it's understandable he has many to care for.

Thank in advance.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Orthodox
Brothers, I'm not sure where to post this, but I'll try here.

The Father has stated that is permissible for me to take bread after communion. If I'm not mistaken it is leavened bread that has been blessed? I accepted it today after the Liturgy. (Serbian Orthodox)

Of course I understand that since I haven't converted, I am forbidden from communion.

Can you please explain how I'm able to accept the bread offering and the significance? The Father explained it a bit on Sunday, but I've lost the translation.

I'm a baby and have many questions, and while The Father has been extremely welcoming, it's understandable he has many to care for.

Thank in advance.
That is called antidoron, I assume the Serbs have their own word for it though. It's just blessed bread, not Christ's body. Think of it as the bread equivalent of holy water. Blessed food and water is good for the soul and body, and I usually ask for it help heal my soul and body in a short prayer when I take antidoron or drink holy water.
 

DeusLuxMeaEst

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
How does one 'vet' an Orthodox parish?

I recently contacted one and received a response. I will go to the services to learn more.

However, when doing more research on it, I read some quotes in articles (in a liberal paper) regarding refugees and they seem to be pro-refugees.

Is this a red flag?

What else should I look for when choosing a parish?

Keep in mind I am in a liberal area, so I assume some will at least tow the line, but how to discern if they are the real deal or going the way of the Catholic church?
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
Listening to homilies is a great way to vet. Many priests (especially in RC churches) have strong private opinions you may agree with but tame them for the broader parish during homilies. It's a good baseline how strong of a stance they're willing/able to take publicly.

One of my first Orthodox Liturgies included an explicit condemnation of usury and I knew I was home.
 

josemiguel

Sparrow
Orthodox
Listening to homilies is a great way to vet. Many priests (especially in RC churches) have strong private opinions you may agree with but tame them for the broader parish during homilies. It's a good baseline how strong of a stance they're willing/able to take publicly.

One of my first Orthodox Liturgies included an explicit condemnation of usury and I knew I was home.
I need to visit your parish, I have yet to meet an Orthodox priest in person who's condemn usury in private.
 

jarlo

Woodpecker
Orthodox
Circumcision was the predecessor to baptism. The Hebrew practice of circumcision was far different than what it is today, it was practically just a nick. Christians are forbidden from practicing Judiasing practices including post 3rd century circumcision which didn't exist prior to 200 AD when the Jews who rejected Christ made the operation more severe.
Do you have any sources on the development of the practice of circumcision among the Hebrews/Jews? I was not aware that it was practiced differently in the centuries before Christ.
 

newcomer

Sparrow
Orthodox Inquirer
Do you have any sources on the development of the practice of circumcision among the Hebrews/Jews? I was not aware that it was practiced differently in the centuries before Christ.
Someone posted an article in one of the threads, Im not sure if it was this one or the JQ thread. I might be wrong, but I think it was @infowarrior1 who posted it(?)
 
Do you have any sources on the development of the practice of circumcision among the Hebrews/Jews? I was not aware that it was practiced differently in the centuries before Christ.
 

DeusLuxMeaEst

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
I am attending my first Orthodox liturgy tomorrow. I'm a little apprehensive since I'll be attending alone and don't know what to expect or how much participation there will be. I have been in communication with the parish so they know I am attending. Any tips?
 

Brebelle3

Robin
Orthodox Inquirer
I am attending my first Orthodox liturgy tomorrow. I'm a little apprehensive since I'll be attending alone and don't know what to expect or how much participation there will be. I have been in communication with the parish so they know I am attending. Any tips?
Very happy for you.

I attended my first liturgy last Sunday (Serbian). After it was over I walked around a bit and looked at the items they had for sale. As everyone sat down to eat, I felt out of place somewhat. I decided I would leave and send a text to the Farher thanking him for having me.

I got to my car, ready to leave, then realized that was absolutely NOT what I came for in the first place.

I walked back in and almost immediately a parishioner introduced himself to me. He took me to meet the priest and the Father specifically sat with me, while introducing me to many parishioners.

I had an amazing time and was the last person to leave. If I had left, I wouldn't have had such a beautiful experience.

Be patient after the liturgy, make eye contact with someone, and introduce yourself. Explain it's your first time and buckle up. You are about to be surrounded by true Christians.

God bless
 

NickK

Kingfisher
Orthodox
@Good_Shepherd

It never made sense to me why God would ask of this, while also saying not to cut ones body. Why make something perfect in His image, that would then have to altered?

How can one circumcise the foreskin of your heart?

Deuteronomy 10:16
Circumcise therefore the foreskin of your heart, and be no more stiffnecked.

Etymology: Fore / skin
Bible references. : Circumcision / Circumcise

Genesis 17:11
And ye shall circumcise the flesh of your foreskin; and it shall be a token of the covenant betwixt me and you.

Etymology: Flesh
Of fruits from 1570s. Figurative use for "carnal nature, animal or physical nature of man" (Old English) is from the Bible, especially Paul's use of Greek sarx, and this led to sense of "sensual appetites" (c. 1200).

Jesus spoke in parables, so I'm still open to what is really meant about this.
The circumcision of the heart is prefigured by the circumcision of the male genitalia. The creative power of a man to give life on this earth coresponds to his spiritaul creative potential to attract Divine Grace from Heaven and make it manifest on earth. But we cannot do that while our hearts are not circumcised, i.e. we still possess the carnal mind. (Gen6:“My spirit shall not dwell with these men in this aeon, for they are flesh”).
Circumcision removes a part of your flesh. Circumcision of the heart removes the carnal mind, the 'old man'.
Circumcision is painful, humiliating. Circumcision of the heart is also painful and humiliating.
Circumcision is done on the 8th day of an infant's life. Circumcision of the heart is done on the the Day of the Lord.
 

DeusLuxMeaEst

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Ok brothers I would like to report on my Orthodox experience.

I really enjoyed the ceremony and found some parallels to the Catholic mass, parts were familiar to me. The priest and parishioners were very friendly. Overall, it was a very positive experience, I enjoyed it and will continue to go back.

I only had a few small concerns. Everyone wore a mask, seemed as there was an edict put in place. Two women were dressed inappropriately for the liturgy, one imparticular who had on a very short skirt. Needless to say it was triggering lust during the ceremony.

I will keep attending to see how I like it and the people.
 
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DeusLuxMeaEst

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Good evening brothers. I had a question regarding attending Vespers.

As I posted I attended a Divine Liturgy last Sunday. Unfortunately, at times I may have a family-related conflict and will be unable to attend.

During these weeks is Vespers a suitable alternative? Surely it must beat not attending anything at all.

My priest has not said anything and just said to attend the Divine Liturgy when I could (I believe he is trying to ease me into the process, which I appreciate.)
 

lskdfjldsf

Pelican
Orthodox Catechumen
Gold Member
Good evening brothers. I had a question regarding attending Vespers.

As I posted I attended a Divine Liturgy last Sunday. Unfortunately, at times I may have a family-related conflict and will be unable to attend.

During these weeks is Vespers a suitable alternative? Surely it must beat not attending anything at all.

My priest has not said anything and just said to attend the Divine Liturgy when I could (I believe he is trying to ease me into the process, which I appreciate.)

Speak with your priest directly. He is your confessor and spiritual mentor, and will ultimately determine the attendance policy at each stage.
 
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