What led you to Christ?

DelMarMisty

Newbie
Lately, I've been noticing more and more people turning to Christ. I've seen some powerful transformations and wondered what led many of you to Christ? Does it shock you how quickly you've turned things around? Do you look back wonder how your perception of the world could have been so skewed? When the veil lifts, it's quite extraordinary. I have always been drawn to the name of Jesus. But didn't walk with Him for a long time. One day earlier this year I was looking for YouTube videos on Christianity etc and I came across this video of Roosh randomly.


At first, I didn't actually recognise that it was the same guy that I heard about 10 years ago, and I was absolutely astounded by his transformation. Everything about him seemed and looked different. This type of thing is really impossible without God's grace. I look around and see a lot of people practising Yoga, mindfulness, etc but freakish emptiness and sadness in people's eyes.
 
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I got myself into a situation that had no good outcomes, and thought “maybe there’s an answer in this Bible thing.” I flipped through pages, stopped where I felt like it, then pointed at a “random” verse that ended up changing my entire life (1 John 4:4):

“He who is in you is stronger than he who is in the world.”

For some reason it clicked and made sense, and I leaned on Jesus - knowing next to nothing about Him at all - to get me through the situation. Miraculously I got through it unscathed, except for the guilt and self-loathing, and from then on I knew I could trust Him to have my back. That was about 4-5 years ago now.
 

gework

Ostrich
Gold Member
Back in 2015 I started to think that a Christian woman would be more suitable for me. I didn't have much of an idea what that was, since my exposure to Christianity has been minimal. But it seemed to fit. I had been of little interest to most women, owing largely to the chasm between my personality and their expectations. But I didn't think I could bring myself to believe in God. I had been highly influenced by Alex-Jones-style Southern conservativism. I started listening to him when I was about 16 or 17. This was when you couldn't get much more than a few 128kbps WMVs of his material. The conservative part of his message didn't register much with me, but as I grew older I became more attracted to the idea of homeschooling and living rurally. This is pretty fringe stuff in my home country. And it was presented in a haphazard manner. But there was no other source I could go to for what was right for me.

It was in late 2018 I had a look round some Christian dating sites, after someone mentioned them here. On one there was a very nice young girl. She seemed quite perfect for me. But I obviously wouldn't have been quite perfect for her at the time as instead I decided to go to el pais da le hola-hola personas instead.

Earlier that year was the first time I had been to a church on my own - The Georgian Orthodox Cathedral in Tbilisi; and in Colombia I went to the Monseratte church in Bogota and a Baptist church on San Andrés. But they did not mean much to me.

In 2019 a Russian girl contacted me again, after I had deleted our means of communication, given I could not figure her out. I liked her too much and for more superficial reasons. She is the only woman I have been stupid for, owing to her appearance. I was drawn back in and went to visit her again this time last year. It became strained again due to lack of understanding. All the clown world and the forum had been pushing me towards the church, but I couldn't quite make the leap to belief. So because of this woman I decided to go to the Catholic cathedral in Moscow. I wrote a little about that somewhere on the forum. In short, I asked for my sins to be taken away and felt I was being covered in thick drops of blood of himself, JC. I asked for a sign as what I should do with this woman. And I felt I should redouble my efforts with her and if it goes nowhere by the time my visa expires then I should do what my heart had been telling me for some time - which is to pursue a traditional Catholic woman. So I did redouble my efforts, and it became good, before it became difficult again. I left.

And since that time belief has just kind of been with me, growing over this year. I can't pin point a specific moment that belief started, which is the same for believing in a spiritual dimension to life, mentioned here.

At the same time someone from the forum posted this video and initially I was drawn in for the lulz, but then I was taken by the odd bit of wisdom. Just FYI.
 

((()))

Sparrow
I thought that I had life all figured out because I read some of the classics and was a red pill bruh.

I always told myself that I'd read the Bible someday.. Just for the knowledge, because who needs religion nowadays right? I wanted to gain knowledge so I could flex on the world.

Boy wasn't I ready for what was to come.

I was struck with the biggest lesson of humility so far in my life.
 

Aboulia

Robin
Here's the short version with as little personal identifiable facts as possible. I grew up in a secular household with divorced parents. Being a loner by nature, I was an athiest as a child as a way to assert autonomy, with a libertarian outlook on life. I was completely accepting of everyone who wasn't pushing something I found obviously false with my limited understanding, or using morality as a club in order to force me into a certain mode of behaviour. Everything had to be explained, I don't care if that's the way people do things, if you can't explain why I should do it, I'm not doing it. I don't care if everyone else is, my conscience isn't satisfied with groupthink. Once I read the gospels in my mid 20s, I loved the beauty of it, but I still stayed completely secular, as I had the view that everyone is responsible for themselves only and there should be no coercion on others behaviour, until I started to see the mental rot pop up advocating what I considered to be obviously morally abhorrent behaviour (beastiality + incest) in internet articles. I needed to find the ground of truth, for there can be no condemnation in amoral libertarianism.

I then started attending a Protestant Church, as what I read in the scriptures didn't match what I read in the bible, and the pastors didn't seem to be bothered that their practice flew in the face of obvious scriptural teaching(women pastors). So I started going to various churches, ditching the ones that involved the emotions, out of all of the various churches, a Calvinist one bogged me down for awhile because it was difficult, slow, reading, but near the end of my journey into Protestantism, I was exposed to E. Michael Jones, in the video "you" by nobodytm, so I started devouring his content and books, then started to question the foundations of Protestantism, the pastor couldn't answer my questions so I started looking to older forms of Christianity, I really didn't like the first Orthodox priest I talked to, he was a Jewish convert, who told me that all religions are basically the same, and cracked crude jokes in my one and only conversation with him. There have only been a few conversations that I walk away feeling really dirty after, and that was one of them.

Looking around nearby, there happened to be a TLM parish with a very sincere, devout priest, although he seemed very distant when you talked to him. After awhile, I became a catachumen, got 1/3 of the way through the catechism, and the whole mechanical answer and response started to bother me, that on top of while reading "Barren Metal", Jones story of Girolamo Savonarola (below) really instilled doubt in the Catholic faith, especially after I read some of the books he referenced in his material on this chapter. Jones' outlook as if to overlook the injustice of the whole affair really bothered me. That and his consistent pro-Catholic bias in all his material. Regardless, I ignored it and continued to go for awhile I got tired of looking, since we live in this flawed imperfect world, maybe that was the best I could find. Scan.jpg

My journey into Orthodoxy started with reading Corneliu Z. Codreanu's "For my Legionnaires". The way Codreanu's love for his people and country manifested itself in his life largely resonated with me, I later ended up stumbling across one of Dr Matthew Raphael Johnson's podcasts, started reading/listening to more of his material, as I couldn't detect that partisan bias that was so off-putting from Dr Jones, maybe I'm too dull to detect it. I ended up getting in contact with him, and while not being that interested in Orthodoxy, I asked him to direct me towards a church, and that's where I ended up staying. I really felt the sense of this is the place for me after talking to the Metropolitan for the first time, he exuded warmth, and yet he could detect my insincerity of interest. This always impressed me. Doctrinally speaking, it made far more sense to me, and since it was not as rigidly defined (as Roman Catholicism is) I found it easier to fit, since the list of things that I had to agree with was much shorter.

Orthodox ritual is far superior as well, in Orthodoxy, the entire building is part of the hierarchy, things that belong in one place, can and should be excluded from another. Reality works the same way, morality couldn't exist otherwise; you want the men in the men's bathroom, and vise versa, when dirt is in the house, it should be removed; when it's in the garden, it's topsoil, leave it be. A major example of this during the ritual is the collection plate, it doesn't exist in Orthodoxy, all donations are given at the entrance before entering the main body of the church, as the money each person has/donates should not change the treatment of the person. In practice, nobody but the person entering at the same time will see if/how much you donate, (the treasurer will see it, if you put it in an envelope and give your name for tax rebate purposes), and since Orthodox services are so long, nobody shows up on time, and people end up entering at different times. How do you teach "Don't judge lest ye be judged" then pass around a large temptation for judgement in the middle of service?
 

sidha

Newbie
I'd just turned 12 and a dramatic play called "Heaven's Gate and Hell Flames" came to town(Bracebridge, Ontario, Canada) and presented in my public school gymnasium. The play was a series of vignettes of the Gospel being presented and the consequences of not accepting it or accepting it.

The entire gym participated in the sinner's prayer and I prayed along. I remember the prayer leader saying, "if you're ready to accept Jesus Christ as your Lord and Savior, please stand." I remember thinking to myself that I wanted to stand but I was afraid that I would be the only one in the entire room who was going to stand, so I kept sitting. I then peeked with one eye and saw everyone standing around me, including my sister and my aunt .. so I stood up.

One thing important to note that I was attending a United Church(protestant) on Sundays. Even still, if I didn't go to that play that night I doubt I would've ever heard the Gospel.
 
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Cpsal

Newbie
Lately, I've been noticing more and more people turning to Christ. I've seen some powerful transformations and wondered what led many of you to Christ? Does it shock you how quickly you've turned things around? Do you look back wonder how your perception of the world could have been so skewed? When the veil lifts, it's quite extraordinary. I have always been drawn to the name of Jesus. But didn't walk with Him for a long time. One day earlier this year I was looking for YouTube videos on Christianity etc and I came across this video of Roosh randomly.


At first, I didn't actually recognise that it was the same guy that I heard about 10 years ago, and I was absolutely astounded by his transformation. Everything about him seemed and looked different. This type of thing is really impossible without God's grace. I look around and see a lot of people practising Yoga, mindfulness, etc but freakish emptiness and sadness in people's eyes.
Hello! I'm so happy to be here with these beautiful women that love the Lord and their families. I'm 31 hispanic and was raised in a non denominational Christian home. My father was an amazing example of a God fearing man. I grew up in church seeing miracles and not doubting at all that God and the spiritual kingdom were real. My father passed away when I was 13 and that definitely sent me on a spiral. Only by the grace of God did I return to Him and gave my whole heart to him. I looked for safety and that love of a father I lost in men but never found it. I hoped dating and falling in love would fill that void but that never happened. I finally told God that I would choose to be happy only with him. That I didn't need a husband or children (which I always wanted) to be happy. He would be my joy and peace. Soon after that I met my amazing husband who loves the Lord and is everything a man should be. I will never stop being grateful for the grace God has shown me. I would love to connect with everyone here! I know this forum will be a blessing to me and many others.
 

Jessie

Newbie
I had very devout Christian parents that modeled the Christian life so well. They spent countless hours reading the Bible with us, working with us on memory verses, taking us to church fellowships, bible studies, etc. They weren’t perfect by far, but they are still among the godliest people I know. I toyed with the idea of rebelling when I was 19, for no good reason. Maybe I was curious? Maybe it was peer pressure? I went to an end-of-semester party some college friends begged me to attend. Just one party, that’s all it took. I had never seen such lost souls in my life and I realized how dark life apart from Christ was. I went home that night feeling like the biggest fool in the entire world. The next morning I threw myself into church life, and never saw those friends again. The next few years were spent making my faith my own, not just my parents’. Lots of reading and studying and meeting with other college girls from church, learning doctrine together, praying, pondering mysteries, listening to the older ladies, holding ourselves accountable to each other, etc. They are still my dearest friends many years later, and I praise God for how gracious he has always been to me.
 

EntWife

Newbie
I posted this originally in the Introduce Yourself thread in answer to a question. It really seems to fit better here. Also, maybe I should have explained that the Theotokos is what we Orthodox call Jesus's mother, Mary. It means "Mother of God". It's a title of honor that also declares our belief in the divinity of Christ.

So here it is:

I was raised in a church that shows up in books with the word "cults" in the title. (No drinking poisoned kool-aid or doing weird sex stuff though! Just kooky, fringe beliefs.) My husband and I met at one of their Bible colleges. Not long after getting married, we left that group and knocked around Protestantism for a handful of years. Then we were baptized and chrismated in the Orthodox Church.

So far so good, right? Except there were always doubts in the back of my mind. "Is this even true? Do miracles actually happen? What if there is no God? Or angels, or saints? Why don't my prayers feel like they go anywhere?" I'd read my Bible or the lives of the saints and struggle to believe that these things actually happened. I'd always been taught that disbelief is a sin so I tried to push these thoughts aside and just believe.

It didn't work though. I finally shared my thoughts with my husband, and he admitted that he had doubts of his own. We initially tried to work through it. Finally, we gave up and became atheists.

People kept asking why I became an atheist, and I gave the standard answers about biblical inconsistencies and things in the Bible that were impossible to believe and just couldn't have happened. It kept bugging me though, this niggling uneasiness that I didn't know why I didn't believe.

After a few more years, I finally figured it out. When I was supposedly a Christian, my actual deeply held belief system was not any version of Christianity. It was scientific materialism, which I had learned from public school and the surrounding culture. I couldn't admit that or even see it at the time because that's not what a Christian is supposed to believe.

Becoming an atheist made it possible for me to openly believe what I believed. I no longer had to hide it from everyone, and even from myself. Initially this was a relief, but doubts started to creep up on me again. Scientific materialism isn't all it's cracked up to be. Are your thoughts just chemical processes and neurons flashing in your brain? What about love? Was my love for my husband and children just brain chemicals? How about their love for me? Did life on earth really come to be through evolution, through blind, mechanistic chance? How is that even possible? Richard Dawkins may claim that, statistically, a group of monkeys with typewriters and enough time could produce the collected works of Shakespeare, but we all know what would happen if he gave monkeys typewriters and let them try. But scientific materialism demands that I believe that evolution could produce our beautiful human DNA, because billions of years!

Eventually, I started wanting to go back to church, although I hadn't figured out yet what to believe after I realized how stupid and fake scientific materialism is. My husband was still dead set against anything to do with Christianity. I ran into some druids and various occult people online. They talked about how this was the same as Christianity, and I could do rituals with Christ and the saints instead of pagan gods or whoever. I started to read up on it, then just barely started to dabble with it. Strange and terrifying things happened.

I turned to the Theotokos for help, and immediately received it. A genuine miracle occurred, and my husband did a complete 180 and decided we needed to go back to the Orthodox Church. That was about three or four years ago. It hasn't been easy, especially since we live in a rural area with no Orthodox church. It's a five hour round trip journey to go to church, which is hard with kids, so we don't go often. We do a reader's service at home most Sundays. I'm asking St. Basil the Great to pray for us and help us to have a church here in the county we live in.
 

Beaker

Robin
Becoming an atheist made it possible for me to openly believe what I believed. I no longer had to hide it from everyone, and even from myself. Initially this was a relief, but doubts started to creep up on me again. Scientific materialism isn't all it's cracked up to be. Are your thoughts just chemical processes and neurons flashing in your brain? What about love? Was my love for my husband and children just brain chemicals? How about their love for me? Did life on earth really come to be through evolution, through blind, mechanistic chance? How is that even possible? Richard Dawkins may claim that, statistically, a group of monkeys with typewriters and enough time could produce the collected works of Shakespeare, but we all know what would happen if he gave monkeys typewriters and let them try. But scientific materialism demands that I believe that evolution could produce our beautiful human DNA, because billions of years!
Right there is the most important issue of our times, and a reconciliation between religion and science is the only way to solve this ideological and rational dead end. Reason alone will lead you to God, the philosophers of the Enlightenment figured this out, yet today's intellectuals are blinded by materialism because of the worship of technology. They have spiritually regressed because of the shock of very rapid innovation, and that's why we're in the 4th industrial revolution.

Economists and billionaires (who are behind the great reset) are materialists and only see the world through the material lens. They don’t understand that people need a lot more than material well being to be happy.

"As long as we only talk about economic classes, profit, salaries, and production, and as long as we believe that real human progress is determined by a particular system of distribution of wealth and goods, then we are not even close to what is essential."
 

Cpsal

Newbie
Right there is the most important issue of our times, and a reconciliation between religion and science is the only way to solve this ideological and rational dead end. Reason alone will lead you to God, the philosophers of the Enlightenment figured this out, yet today's intellectuals are blinded by materialism because of the worship of technology. They have spiritually regressed because of the shock of very rapid innovation, and that's why it's the 4th industrial revolution.

Economists and billionaires (who are behind the great reset) are materialists and only see the world through the material lens. They don’t understand that people need a lot more than material well being to be happy.

"As long as we only talk about economic classes, profit, salaries, and production, and as long as we believe that real human progress is determined by a particular system of distribution of wealth and goods, then we are not even close to what is essential."
Amen, very well said.
 

EntWife

Newbie
One of the problems is that "science" is being used to push materialism and progressivism. There are people who accept materialism and progressivism because they are afraid that if they don't they'll be seen as ignorant and uneducated.

It also doesn't help that scientists bring their own preconceived ideas to the "scientific studies" they do. I've seen some pretty ridiculous stuff from scientists over the years. I pass around articles about "scientific studies" that either come to conclusions that I already agreed with or that really make sense. If I think a "scientific study" is wrong, I say so, give my reasons, then mock it mercilessly.

Edit: This is in reply to @Beaker.
 

Starlight

Newbie
I was born and raised in the Lutheran church (LCMS), attended a Lutheran elementary, then a Catholic high school, followed by a semi-well known Catholic university (which was academically completely disappointing and incredibly expensive... but it’s Jesuits... what else would anyone expect.) I was raised in a very traditional Christian nuclear family. My dad literally forbade my mother from working for a paycheck (She became a serious church volunteer and committed herself to community service instead, a much better use of her time.) We attended church nearly every Sunday and all extra holiday services. I never really knew life without God or the Church in my life. And I took it for granted.

But what I have realized is how important God and the Church are and made a personal conscious decision to live my life as a Christian and raise my children in the Church.

My husband and I were married in the Orthodox Church, specifically Greek Orthodox, and my Chrismation (with economy) was planned to happen at the same ceremony as when our first child was baptized in the Orthodox Church. My husband and I attended church within that time sporadically and eventually our first child was born. Unfortunately, during that same time, my husband and the Priest had an argument after trying to counsel my husband’s mother and my husband walked away from the Orthodox Church or at least that specific church parish. It was and is heart breaking. His great-grandparents were part of the original mission that started that church...

So our children were baptized in the Lutheran church instead (because they had to be baptized somewhere) and only because my husband knew it was important to me that the children be baptized and that it made my parents happy. After his argument with the priest, he pretty much believed (still believes) that most Priests/Pastors are grifters and hypocrites. Please understand I don’t want to offend anyone, this is his/our experience and I’m not saying all are like this.

When our children were little we led fairly insular lives. He would work and I’d stay home with the kids. We were so young, we didn’t really have any friends, not even church ones. We had very little money and relied on each other, God, and our ingenuity to make life wonderful for our children.

Eventually, the oldest was school age and that’s when we both really “woke up” to the outside world, the dark world we would eventually send our beautiful children into. I remember taking my daughter into the “preview kindergarten” at the local public school we lived near at the time. And I was so terrified for my child. There was no way I could leave her there. So both of us decided to cling to the Church and we were blessed with scholarships for our children to attend a Christian school. Eventually, the school closed because of the recession as no one could afford the extra expense. Fortunately, we moved around the same time and now our children go to a small public neighborhood school where the teachers are openly, explicitly, Christian. God always finds a way for His People.

When God opened my eyes to the real evil of the world, it took my children to be sensitive to and aware of this, that is when when I made my conscious decision to live my life in the Church committed Christ and raise our children in the Church as well.

I’m still working on my husband who has become resistant to anything “organized religion.” He is a wonderful husband, father, and leader. If prodded, he will proudly state that he is a Christian and he wears a cross, undershirt, to work everyday. He has a very quiet and internal spiritual life but absolutely “walks the walk” of Jesus in his daily life. He abhors liars and hypocrites. And I understand his qualms with his home church but I wish I could get him to step foot into an Orthodox Church again. I know he hasn’t taken communion for more than a decade.

On a side note, I have to say, that it is no coincidence that the Holy Spirit has lead me (and the beginning of many others) here to this forum. In some round-about way, God has intended Roosh to call people to true Christianity. There is no other reason why.
 
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infowarrior1

Hummingbird
When I was a child. I had a strong sense of the supernatural.

I used to think stars were like holes behind which was heaven. A very beautiful place I wanted to reach but cannot.

But I drifted into Atheism by the time I started High School and I ceased to believe that this world had ultimate meaning. Aside from finding meaning in Science and in Progress and the majesty of the Stars.

When I contemplated the reality of death. I was terrified. I'd imagine that after I die. I ceased to exist.

I went through a phase in high school in seeking for the ultimate truth.

So I was getting into Buddhism and other kinds of philosophies of this nature. And even New Age influenced philosophies that have an uncanny resemblance to Hinduism.

But I think my Religious Teacher in High School in helping to guide me to the Christian faith. There was a unique Aura where Christians often gathered even informally in certain areas in my High School.

A room set aside in Industrial Arts Room is where I often met that Man. Even with decorations of any nature the fact that activities relating to Scripture and God was often performed there gave it this atmosphere. Like it appeared that Heaven entered Earth.

There was no icons or pictures. Maybe scripture verses painted at certain areas of the room. But it felt like a Church. Really strange. The sunlight that came in helped to give it that feel. And there was a certain smell like a kind of perfume. Maybe its real perfume. But its interesting that it gave that impression.

I also remember inadvertently reading a Bible in my Non-Christian days when I was very into reading in the Bookstore in my Local Shopping Center. And even then it really felt like something Supernatural was in that book. I think it was a King James Version Bible.
 

infowarrior1

Hummingbird
Right there is the most important issue of our times, and a reconciliation between religion and science is the only way to solve this ideological and rational dead end. Reason alone will lead you to God, the philosophers of the Enlightenment figured this out, yet today's intellectuals are blinded by materialism because of the worship of technology. They have spiritually regressed because of the shock of very rapid innovation, and that's why we're in the 4th industrial revolution.

Economists and billionaires (who are behind the great reset) are materialists and only see the world through the material lens. They don’t understand that people need a lot more than material well being to be happy.

"As long as we only talk about economic classes, profit, salaries, and production, and as long as we believe that real human progress is determined by a particular system of distribution of wealth and goods, then we are not even close to what is essential."

I think this Youtube playlist has already solved many of those problems that seem to make Science opposed to religion:
 
Oh, goodness. This question. I could write for pages and pages on this topic, but I'll try to condense.

I am an individual who struggles greatly with this issue. Faith has not been easy to come by. I was raised Catholic; stopped going in early adolescence. In my early 20's, after giving birth to my first child, I found myself seeking God pretty desperately. I found a Pentecostal church and went there for about 15 years. Fast-forward to my mid 30's and I found my faith rapidly dying. It continued to die to the point of complete loss. But it left a hole; it left too many questions unanswered. At age 35 I found myself drawn back to the Mass. I am now in my early 40's. I am most comfortable personally at Catholic Mass. My husband is firmly Protestant so I will happily attend church with him as well.

Although I struggle intensely with doubts and questions, the realities of life show me that God too is real.
 

Jessie

Newbie
Oh, goodness. This question. I could write for pages and pages on this topic, but I'll try to condense.

I am an individual who struggles greatly with this issue. Faith has not been easy to come by. I was raised Catholic; stopped going in early adolescence. In my early 20's, after giving birth to my first child, I found myself seeking God pretty desperately. I found a Pentecostal church and went there for about 15 years. Fast-forward to my mid 30's and I found my faith rapidly dying. It continued to die to the point of complete loss. But it left a hole; it left too many questions unanswered. At age 35 I found myself drawn back to the Mass. I am now in my early 40's. I am most comfortable personally at Catholic Mass. My husband is firmly Protestant so I will happily attend church with him as well.

Although I struggle intensely with doubts and questions, the realities of life show me that God too is real.

What caused your faith to die? Is there anything we can help with?
 
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