Whenever you finish a book, post it here

Ski pro

 
Banned
I have lots of books that I’ve finished reading but I’m not going to post them here any more because it occurred to me that amazon could quite easily synch the books you read to what you downloaded or bought.

If anyone wants a list I’ll happily pm them it
 

CaptainS

Hummingbird
Hostage to the Devil by Malachi Martin.

It's about 5 cases of demonic possession that all happened in modern times. Great book and relevant as it touches on just about every degeneracy that's currently going mainstream - trannies to narcissistic slutty women to incels.
 

911

Peacock
Catholic
Gold Member
Malachi Martin should know about demons, he is one of the biggest traitors to the Church, and was a major operator in subverting the American Catholic Church for the benefit of the AJC/ADL, who funded him. He was exposed by E. Michael Jones:

 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
911 said:
Malachi Martin should know about demons, he is one of the biggest traitors to the Church, and was a major operator in subverting the American Catholic Church for the benefit of the AJC/ADL, who funded him. He was exposed by E. Michael Jones:



This is a bit of a derail.

What does this have to do with his account of personal experience with exorcisms? Do you have any proof that he gets his theology wrong in the book?

I found this book valuable.

I am still on the fence about Martin, as he has his defenders too, like Bernard Jantzen of Canada, who believes most of the accusations against Martin are a coordinated smear campaign.

From what I remember, Jones and his other critics deal with a lot of gossip and insinuation and are pretty thin when it comes to clear evidence.

Like I said though, I am on the fence about this issue, and learned a lot from the hours and hours of interviews Martin did with Art Bell which are available on Youtube, so unless there is proof that his explanations of the demonic and Catholic theology are incorrect, the accusations that he was a Jewish agent are a derail when it comes to the subject of this book.
 

CaptainS

Hummingbird
debeguiled said:
I found this book valuable.

I wonder who the character Carl is based on. The whole Rooster and the Tortoise section suggests that some people really do have low-level psychic abilities. And that all cases of Astral Projection are a demonic illusion.

Everyone seems so broken afterward. I'd like to know how their lives turned out.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Captainstabbin said:
debeguiled said:
I found this book valuable.

I wonder who the character Carl is based on. The whole Rooster and the Tortoise section suggests that some people really do have low-level psychic abilities. And that all cases of Astral Projection are a demonic illusion.

Everyone seems so broken afterward. I'd like to know how their lives turned out.

You know how people say that when they read the Bible, it is like it is speaking directly to them?

Did you ever kind of get this feeling, but in an evil way, when you were reading this book?

I found sometimes I would have to stop reading because the interactions between the demons and the possessed were almost too real, and I was thinking that I could easily have been tempted the way some of them were tempted.

Like the devil, through this book, is talking to the secret pride of the reader?

Also, in the chapter on the tranny R/R, Martin wrote some of the clearest and most beautiful words I have ever read regarding the true meaning of masculine and feminine.

I actually wrote some of it down and saved it to a word file:



Exorcist on trannies.

From Hostage to the Devil

Chapter: The Girl Fixer

P183

“Nature may goof and give us the wrong genitals for our gender. No matter. Apart from a mutant form of that kind, our sexual apparatus corresponds to what we are—feminine or masculine. Androgyny is baloney.”


P183

“As far as I know, God is beautiful, is beauty itself. Beauty in being. Beauty that is beauty. And God’s will is in full possession of that beauty, that being. In human love, woman loving is that being’s echo; and man desiring is that will’s parallel. They simply reproduce, know, participate in God’s life and love, in God’s self some way or other. Otherwise, let’s go back to the kangaroos . . .”


p184

A bird doesn’t fly because it has wings. It has wings because it flies. A man isn’t a man because he has a penis and a scrotum, nor a woman feminine because she has a vagina and womb and estrogen or whatever. They have all that—if they have it—because she’s feminine and he’s masculine. Even if they lack some or all of those things, they are still masculine and feminine.


P185

I think the terrible fragility of human love becomes more beautiful and you are frightened for its safety. Poor R/R and his delicate dreams! He really, genuinely yearned to be feminine and love as only a woman can.”


P186

Many a woman and many a man must have had R/R’s same beautiful dream . . . saw it within finger’s touch, reached for it, and found it blighted before they held it . . . I don’t know why I cry for them. Feeling for them, perhaps. For only Jesus can mend the fracture of their spirit.”


P191 in seventies, all social construct. We are all androgynous.


P191

He developed into a “watcher on the sidelines,” jealous of the supremacy of the feminine. (is this a quote?)


P192

The mystery of the feminine became something to unshroud; in R/R’s case his unshrouding of it amounted to blasphemy and a type of physi-comoral degradation which haunts him today.”
(47 years old)


P198

“I have yielded . . .against my training.” Abdicated the responsibility of maleness. (Quote?)

P198

Hearing his dad’s voice. “we men must be strong—chin up, chin up . . .”


P199

“I don’t want a man’s hardness and strength. I want your wholeness.”


P209

he admitted to himself after a while that in all these sexual encounters it was not a genuinely male sexual desire that impelled him. It was rather a jealous curiosity about the female and the feminine.


P209

“he stood helplessly hip deep in the running streams of impulses where before a sharp instinct or a brilliant perception had teamed with” (get rest of quote.)


P238

“a belly on two legs stumbling aimlessly across the dry bed of confirmed hopelessness.”


P239

loving it all, all the degradation . . .anything to disfigure beauty.


P241

We start with self growth, self discovery. We tell ‘em, we told Rita: first you must be yourself, find yourself, know who you are. They stick their noses in their own navels and say: I like my own smell!

This stuff seriously gave me chills. You can probably easily guess which quotes come from the exorcist, and which ones come from the demon.
 

CaptainS

Hummingbird
debeguiled said:
We start with self growth, self discovery. We tell ‘em, we told Rita: first you must be yourself, find yourself, know who you are. They stick their noses in their own navels and say: I like my own smell!

This stuff seriously gave me chills. You can probably easily guess which quotes come from the exorcist, and which ones come from the demon.

This quote is like the anthem for modern society. Sadly, I know the source.
 

TigerMandingo

 
Banned
Paracelsus said:
If you can handle historical fiction, I'd strongly recommend Colleen McCullough's Masters of Rome series, which runs more or less from Marius through to Sulla through to the rough end of Julius Caesar's run. It comes with a lot of recommendations from historians as very well researched and pretty true to events as best we know them. And if it's any extra accolade, apparently lesbians hate it for the way it portrays women. It's not written by a man, of course, but I'd give it a pass in this case.

Bought Caesar. That book looks awesome, and I had no idea Colleen McCullough was the author of the Thorn Birds which is hugely popular in the FSU. Probably a novel I should read at some point, as well.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
TigerMandingo said:
Bought Caesar. That book looks awesome, and I had no idea Colleen McCullough was the author of the Thorn Birds which is hugely popular in the FSU. Probably a novel I should read at some point, as well.

Interesting factoid: the front matter of The Thorn Birds reads as follows:

There is a legend about a bird which sings just once in its life, more sweetly than any other creature on the face of the earth. From the moment it leaves the nest it searches for a thorn tree, and does not rest until it has found one. Then, singing among the savage branches, it impales itself upon the longest, sharpest spine. And, dying, it rises above its own agony to out-carol the lark and the nightingale. One superlative song, existence the price. But the whole world stills to listen, and God in His heaven smiles. For the best is only bought at the cost of great pain.... Or so says the legend.

Those of you who've read Dan Simmons' Hyperion Cantos and remember the tale of Martin Silenus might be wondering whether Mr Simmons has read this book.

Anyway, onward:
The Four Hour Work Week, Tim Ferriss

9780091929114_p0_v1_s260x420.JPG


Yes, I'm a latecomer to this book. Forum thread on the book is here. Seems to have a decent number of testimonials. Seems to work based on the brothers' views here.

As for my take on it?

It's a stereotypically American book: one part useable material, one part selfishness, one part bullshit. Slightly more useful than Robert Kiyosaki's combined works.

It interfaces -- superficially -- with Seneca and stoicism, which is nice, and it's one of those things where if you've been hanging in this forum for a few years a decent proportion of it will be familiar.

Still, for me the telling part is the character of the individual who's revealed. Maybe the most glaring part is how he suggests you make yourself an expert in the eyes of the media: do two presentations, join a trade association, and then join ProfNet, which apparently is where the media look up the talking heads who appear on our screens. And of course he uses the get-out clause to avoid being sued: don't say you're anything you're not.

This is wrong. Part of the fucking problem with our world is exactly this sort of behaviour - with the perception being more important than the reality. Not that it bothers Ferriss one bit: his answer to morality and the great questions of life is: unless it impacts directly on you or is actionable, forget about it. Don't ask the big questions. Worse still that the main reason he developed that view on life was because he clearly developed existential dread and querying what exactly he'd actually achieved after having enough money to wipe his ass with it.

He defines happiness as, and I quote, whatever excites you. He modifies this later on in the book to mean whatever excites and/or you find rewarding. It does not surprise me in the least that this sort of man remains without a partner and without children; this sort of shit stops working when you have to accept the drudgery that's involved in fostering a relationship or raising kids. You can't outsource good parenting, not for lack of trying by every generation from the Baby Boomers onward.

Again, I am not questioning that, applied thick and strong according to the principles (as opposed to the instructions) set out in the book, you could maybe make a motza. In that respect the book is superior to a Robert Kiyosaki offering. But am I questioning who you'd become in pursuit of that aim.

And yeah, I've decided to start doing long reviews again. Maybe they only reveal who I am rather than reveal the book, but it's as much my own way of crystallising the thoughts I have out of reading them.
 

RWIsrael

Woodpecker
Jewish
I've just finished reading Generation Kill by Evan Wright, a Rolling Stone journalist who was embedded with Bravo Company, First Recon Marines during the second invasion of Iraq.
Not a bad writeup if you're interested in a grunt-level view of the invasion and enjoyed the HBO show.

I've started reading One Bullet Away by Nathaniel Fick who was a platoon commander in the same company during the war and recounts his experiences. It presents events in a more matter-of-fact way rather than focus on the characters and interactions between them.

Interesting to see different perspectives of the same events.
 
The 4 Hour Work Week to me is an essential mid 00s book. That stuff was DONE after the financial crisis. It's not a bad book per se, quite inspiring, but the risk is actually buying into his ideology of rootless modern man.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
The Tower of the Swallow, Andrezj Sapkowski

9781473211575.jpg


Well, this got a lot better. Pretty much have to accept most of the book is about Ciri, but it's a mud-splattered, blood-soaked, sweaty trip that turns your guts.

The points of view constantly shift between past and present, which in most other books you'd think were a pain in the ass, but it's actually a fun ride. You're often getting the story through very biased eyes, but Sapkowski does it basically to keep you entertained, not to Experiment With Narrative Foundations And Challenge The Patriarchal Place Of Literature or shit like that. It's a good, solid, fast read. And the preview they give you of The Lady of The Lake is enough to make your hair stand on end. Looking forward to the last one.
 

Lance Blastoff

Woodpecker
Gold Member
The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer

Shirer was CBS's correspondent in Berlin 1934-1941 and left the country a few days before Pearl Harbor. Fascinating perspective on how Hitler came to power, how he built the nazi war machine and how it all came down. Only time I've ever really read a survey book about WWII and it was absolutely impossible to put down.
 

JayR

Kingfisher
Atheist
iam1albertan said:
Animal Farm and 1984 by George Orwell

Definitely must reads in today's society.

Just finished "1984," having somehow gotten through school without reading it. Probably goes without saying, but the Orwell's prescience was incredible given the present surveillance and media culture in the US. Hard to believe he wrote it in 1947.
 

Alpone

Woodpecker
Just finished "Miami" by Joan Didion. It was a lot of inside baseball stuff about Cubans immigrating to Miami and the politics they brought with them. Surprised to learn how much CIA activity and small scale terrorism occurred in 1980s Miami. A lot more crime overall back then. Seems Miami is way better now.
 

bgbusiness

Kingfisher
Here are my books that I have finished so far this year alone except the 5th one last one, just started..

1. Creativity by Ed Catmull (January)
- Wasn't that great, talks about Disney and how it was a very innovative/creative company.
- Didn't get much out of it as it was just more like "bragging", maybe I had too high of an expectation.

2. Blink by Malcolm Gladwell (February)
- Another book that disappointed in me, made me not to read any more "psychology" or any books related to "subconsiouness".
- I could expect how the next sentence or the next chapter will play out, didn't get much out of this book.
- no action steps on how to improve your life, very fluffy.

3. Principles - Ray Dalio (March)
- Maybe I am highly interested in Finance and that's why this book stuck with me, but I really enjoyed this book.
- One of my favorites this year if not favorite of all time.
- Listening to Ray Dalio's perspective on how to build a company, how to live a life, it's just on a different level.
- Not saying money is everything, but the author does have almost $20bil in his pocket.

4. Tactial Guide to Women - Shawn T. Smith (End of March)
- Great book, many concepts/ideas are already on the internet, but it's always a great refresher to read a book like this to cement the red pill into your soul.

5. Dealing with People You can’t Stand by Dr. Rick Brinkman & Dr. Rick Kirschner (April)
- Just started, will get back later.

6. Crucial Conversations by Patterson & Grenny & McMillan & Switzler (Last week of March & Beginning of April…)
- Fucking amazing book! It shows you how to balance being an asshole & being nice without sacrificing your own self-respect and killing the relationship. It shows the SMALL nuances of conversations.
- Not entirely pickup related, but very useful in relationships/marriages and in corporate world.
 

bgbusiness

Kingfisher
Forgot to post this before...some of the books that I have finished last year...

1. Art of the Deal - Donald Trump (May 2018)
- What more can I say? It's the book by the pimp real estate mogul, Mr.Trump's thoughts, words, and actions combined in one book.
- His way of thinking, being analytical and street-smart at the same time.
- Must read for businessman. Very inspirational & can tell how he started forming the philosophies that he has right now since the books gives good details on how he grew up...

2. Manipulated Man (May 2018)
- super quick read, less than 100 pages.
- very, very red pilled book. Won't hurt to read it.

3. Art of Seduction - Robert Green (August 2018)
- Maybe I had too high of an expectation after reading 48 laws of power...
- This book was pretty hard to finish. I mean it is a very dense/thick book, but it just seemed very dry for me.
- Wouldn't hurt to read it, but not my favorite...

4. Influence
- A little bit outdated concepts, but a quick read. Got some good ideas out of it.
- Reminded me of 48 laws of power, how to win friends & influence people, pick up concepts like social proof/pre-selection all included in here.

5. Be Obsessed or Be Average - Grant Cardone (September 2018)
- Quick, powerful, motivational read.
- A lot of fluff & motivational talk, but was a fun read. Recommended.

6. Power of Habit - Charles Duhigg (November 2018)
- This book was good, but that's it. Not astonishing, I personally think that it was overrated.
- Many concepts & ideas, but does not provide any concrete actionable steps and most of them were pretty common sense...Too high expectation on my part.
- Doesn't hurt to read it though, quick read also.
 

bgbusiness

Kingfisher
Paracelsus said:
Outliers, Malcolm Gladwell

1ec7cd5b-f07a-4918-a0c5-542a537bddb9.png



- You get more out of Taleb's books than this shit.

Understood.
I have heard a lot of bad reviews of this book, I don't know why people like it. After reading Blink by Malcolm Gladwell, I decided not to read any of his other books.
 

bgbusiness

Kingfisher
Capitalism without Capital by Jonathan Haskel & Stain Westlake
https://www.amazon.com/Capitalism-w...691175039/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_pdt_img_top?ie=UTF8

This book describes how the everything is changing from tangible assets to intangible assets and companies are becoming "leaner", but more efficient than ever.

One of the only business books that was recommended by Bill Gates, so I had to pick it up and read it.

I would encourage for people to read this book who are in the business world, very informative and the author breakdown technical terms easily for people who doesn't have a lot of knowledge in business/accounting/econ.
 
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