Whenever you finish a book, post it here

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member
An0dyne said:
The post-modern ideology (a misnomer if there ever was one) has us believe there is no truth--in the infamous words of Pontius Pilate, "What is truth?" (Standing in front of you, dope).
Quod est veritas?
Vides quaerere!
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
Disappointing a book hasn't been posted here in a while, but I'm finishing up How to Be Rich by J. Paul Getty, the man behind Getty Oil. He was once the world's richest man. I only heard about this book when referenced by the actor playing Getty in the 2017 movie All the Money in the World. Fun fact - it was supposed to be Kevin Spacey playing the part of Getty, but he got righteously hit with a meetoo torpedo and they swapped him out for Christopher Plummer.

The title of the book isn't how to GET rich, mind you - but how to BE rich. It's more about Getty's outlook and approaches to business rather than a feel good how-to motivation piece.

Published in 1965 by Playboy Press, that means, unintentionally, that the best part about it isn't so much what's in the book, but what's NOT in the book. Every page is all about the young businessman, what he would do, and his approach. Not one word about climate change, diversity consultants, pride month or girls who code.

Damn, if it isn't as refreshing a cultural study as it is a worthwhile business read.

He's surprisingly pro-labor and detests both condescending executives who look down on labor as an adversary as much as he does corrupt union bosses operating without the best interest of their charges. The current state of Detroit is evidence though that not enough people read that chapter or took the lessons therein very seriously if they did. I'd like to think as sensible about costs as Getty was he would be rolling over in his grave if he saw the effects of cheap labor visas on the working classes. His day was pre-1965 immigration act, pre-H1B visa and he couldn't imagine the concept of a call center in India - that's what the *female* secretary pool did.

While reading this book I couldn't stop appreciating the straightforward nature of business discussion and no-bullshit yet positive outlook on getting things done. No "go find yourself" nonsense, no flowery lingo, just a matter of fact tone that never got old. Contrast this writing with every insufferable silicon valley "business" book put out by the latest globohomo oligarch - it's 1/3rd useful substance and 2/3rds prosaic pro-feminist nonsense to satisfy the cat lady reviewers.

I'm not certain whether Getty dictated it, wrote it himself or had other help. However it happened, the language is echelons above what the average NPC bugman will understand without his iPhone to look up the words, and references to artists I'd forgotten even existed. This man was no Philistine - he knew what he was talking about, not just what he paid for a painting.

His personal life was a bit of a mess, so I guess that part hasn't changed among the super successful. It's a worthwhile read if only to remember that once it was possible to do business without Ted Talks and turtlenecks. Refreshing and recommended.
 
Why We Want You to be Rich - Donald Trump, Robert Kiyosaki.

Red Circle: My Life in the Navy SEAL Sniper Corps and How I Trained America's Deadliest Marksmen - Brandon Webb

Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL warrior - Rorke Denver

Strength Finder 2.0: Leadership Edition - Tom Rath

Strength Finder 2.0 - Tom Rath
 

Caractacus Potts

Woodpecker
Gold Member
"Inside the Foreign Legion- The Sensational Story of the World's Toughest Army" by John Parker.

I picked up this book from the sale rack at the library. The book was published in 1998. It does a good job of describing the Legion from its formation in the 1830's through its missions in the Middle East during the first Gulf War and operations in Bosnia in the 1990s.

The middle and of the book are probably the best because the author has more stories from ex-Legionnaires that he himself interviewed. It was interesting hearing their stories in their own words. The Legion maintained corporal punishment and wasn't above a punch to the face or a knee to the gut despite directives from above after PC culture started its long slow creep through other institutions.

I wasn't aware that it was an English Legionnaire who attempted to assasinate DeGaulle in 1961.

All-in-all this was a good, easy read. If you are looking for something entertaining yet also interesting and informative, yet not too dense, I recommend you check out this book. The author also has one about the British SBS (Special Boat Service) similar to US Navy SEALS.
 

BigFellow

Sparrow


I recently finished reading The Biblical Masculinity Blueprint: A Christian Man's Guide to Attraction, Relationships, and Marriage in a Messed-Up World , by Stephen Casper. The content of this book would resonate with many people posting on the new version of the RooshV forum. It synthesizes red pill thinking with the Bible.

Casper argues that the man is in charge of the marital relationship. He criticizes a lot of modern Christian thinking that treats husband and wife as equal, and says this causes problems in marriages. He says the wife's job is to submit to her husband. He says women are not impressed by men trying to share housework; men should do manly chores like construction and yard work and the woman should do things like cooking and cleaning. Women are attracted to strong, masculine men, and not a Mr. Nice Guy. Just being nice all the time is a feminine attribute. If a woman just wants someone who is nice, she can go be around another woman.

He also says that physical, sexual attraction is important in a relationship. We hear many religious leaders say that you should just look at the other person's character or look at her heart, and downplay physical attractiveness. Casper is actually honest and says physical attractiveness is very important to a healthy relationship. He criticizes people who get fat and out of shape. He says both the man and the woman have an obligation to physically take care of themselves and try to be sexually attractive to the spouse. I was impressed to hear this, as I very rarely hear something like this from a Christian leader. We live in a culture of fat overweight women, because women are told it's okay and men are supposed to just love them for who they are.

Also it is unbiblical to tell men they are supposed to wait until they are done with all higher education and have a stable, steady job, before getting married. The Bible doesn't say this; it says it's better to marry than to burn. When we tell men to wait, we are encouraging isolation and this causes people to become interested in pornography. Instead men who want to get married should be getting married. But marriage isn't required. It's optional.

He says men should not "pursue" women, meaning if the woman doesn't immediately express interest, men should stop there, and not keep trying. I'm not yet sure if I completely agree with that, but anyway it's an interesting point. His argument is that if the woman reluctantly enters a relationship, it won't be as happy, and she might leave him if she later meets another guy who is more handsome or more interesting.

He goes through a list of questions for discussion when considering whether to marry someone. I didn't spend a lot of time thinking about this because I'm not at that stage yet. I might go back to that chapter if I ever reach that stage.

As for weaknesses, Casper occasionally falls into the feminist trap of using the word "they" to refer to an indefinite person in the singular, sometimes even a person in the singular when the person's sex is known. I would like to see our culture retreat from that, as it is not proper English. He uses a few vulgar words like "crap" which I didn't really appreciate.

Near the end of the book he takes a somewhat moderate position on women working outside the home; he says their focus should be on the home and the career should take a back seat to that, but he doesn't seem to be strongly committed to that and says in Bible times women worked outside the time. I see so many of today's ills caused by women working outside the home, I would like to see criticism of working women in more depth. But maybe you can find that elsewhere.

All in all, it's a fresh perspective on relationships that you don't typically see.
Definitely worth the read.
 

BlastbeatCasanova

Kingfisher
I just finished the Arc of a Scythe trilogy



I thought it was one of the more compelling fiction series I've read in recent years. I know a lot of people like to poo-poo on fiction but this series was entertaining while exploring themes of death, immortality, AI, futuristic tech, and how those in power try to obfuscate the truth. Also great world building IMO - Basically in the distant future the world is ran smoothly by a benevolent god-like AI; because of advanced tech humans don't suffer pain, are virtually immortal and are revived easily should they suffer a mortal injury. The AI decides that death is a strictly human affair and cedes responsibility to an elite group of humans who are in charge of culling the world population at their discretion.

I think it's geared toward young adults but it felt way less corny/cringey than the Hunger Games despite some similarities between the two series (female and male protagonist, etc.)

I would recommend the books. No poz except the author threw a "non-binary" character in the last book - wasn't a massive deal, it just felt forced. They are developing a movie out of the books due to their popularity so if fiction ain't your thing then you can see if on the big/little screen.
 
"Blowing Up Russia: Terror from Within" is a chronicle of Russia in the final years of Yeltsin, as Putin begins his ascendancy. And yes, it was written by the guy poisoned by the FSB with Polonium in London, Alexander Litvinenko, and co-author Yuri Felshtinsky.

The story deals mainly with Russian intelligence services, graft, corruption, and war-mongering as the economically destroyed and politically irrelevant rump state of the soviet union, Russia, seeks to restore glory to the motherland. In the form of false flag attacks and subterfuge.

What the truth movement is to 9/11, this is 10x over for state-sponsored terror and the manufacture of consent in a nation looking for an enemy to turn its angst and anger at. At the core of the book is that the Chechen civil wars were fabricated to enrich and empower members of the state, mafia and intelligence services, who switch hats like a balding man. In the end, it's the state doing the terrorism.

Eye-opening revelations, so damning, one of its authors was killed and publication was banned in Russia. tells you all you need to know.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blowing_Up_Russia
 

Teedub

Crow
Gold Member
Madness of Crowds by Douglas Murray. Nothing mind blowing but a good companion piece to his excellent 2017 magnum opus The Strange Death of Europe.

Highly recommend both.
 

Alsos

Kingfisher
”Dune”.

Decided to reread it for the first time in five or six years, after learning that a new, supposedly more faithful to the book movie is coming out next year.

It was very different from what I remember, despite this being perhaps the fourth time I've read the book in the past 25 years. I recall the story focusing more on the Fremen revolt and the shenanigans of the Harkonnens and Bene Gesserit than on Muad-dib’s awakening. Or more precisely, that there was more story in those areas than there was. That the Emperor and Mohiam had larger roles, as well, but aside from the latter appearing in the ”gom jabbar" scene near the beginning, they are completely absent until the very end. The end itself seemed rushed, particularly after the arrival of Gurney Halleck.

And I still don't get the obsession with Duncan Idaho. He's the Boba Fett of the Dune universe.

Having not seen the David Lynch adaptation in 20 years, it surprised me both how much of my mental image of the people and settings were influenced by that film (despite having read the book first), and how Lynch managed to derive what he did from the source material.

It's still a great book, and it's studded with interesting aphorisms, but it was hard not to feel a little disappointment that it wasn't what I remembered.
 

Loki131

Pigeon
whitewashedblackguy said:
Why We Want You to be Rich - Donald Trump, Robert Kiyosaki.

Red Circle: My Life in the Navy SEAL Sniper Corps and How I Trained America's Deadliest Marksmen - Brandon Webb

Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL warrior - Rorke Denver

Strength Finder 2.0: Leadership Edition - Tom Rath

Strength Finder 2.0 - Tom Rath
Is Why We Want You to be Rich - Donald Trump, Robert Kiyosaki. worth a read?
 

Loki131

Pigeon
Paracelsus said:
World War Z, Max Brooks



So bloody Millennial it hurts.

Elements of it are Red Pill - and confrontingly so - but Brooks just can't get his fucking politics out of the way. Fetishisation of the New Deal, fiftysomething ex-nuns on the firing line for fifteen hours straight, constant tilts of the fedora to climate change, always the post-imperialist mindset. Brooks is the son of Mel Brooks and Anne Bancroft, has been in the entertainment industry a while.

All of that said, it's a pretty good read, more a series of interlinked short stories than anything else, but it works pretty well. Particularly liked the story he did of the guy left behind in Japan, watch out for it, it's pretty cool. I just wish he'd tried a bit harder not to put his leftie credentials on display.
The audiobook was fantastic. They did an excellent job with it. I highly recommend it.
 
I am using this coronavirus downtime/self enforced quarantine to dive head long into my pile of books I have slowly been gathering for the past year. I am a bit of a sci-fi junky, albeit my tastes are for the older novels where social justice is largely absent. One of the most readable and memorable for me was Richard Matheson's I am Legend, which upon reflection seems quite apt given the quarantine situation the world finds itself in. The book is a stone cold sci-fi classic; the SF Masterworks version I got was a joy to read and I love the old timey sci-fi artwork, which captures the mood of the book perfectly.

[attachment=43243]

Add this book to the increasingly long list of Hollyweird movies that piss all over the source material and claim it is a betterment. Literally everything described in the book is opposite in the film. Neville's character is visually a complete 180; the setting is in Manhattan, not a quiet residential suburb and the mystery, the sense of isolation is completely lost. The introduction of characters and their back stories are completely different. The motivations of Neville and his backstory are typical disaster movie farce, driven by Hollywood's obsession with horrible disaster movies and flashy action sequences. The movie, if it was a standalone would be fine; the main issue is that the book is so good it comes off as nothing put a purposeful, pastiche rewrite forcing in the usual sjw crap. Its subtle, but its there.

SPOILERS BELOW......

The book says explicitly that the main character, Robert Neville is a white, long hair, bearded man with an imposing build who has lost his wife and child, everything he loved to a vampiric disease. The main antagnoists are described as vampires but they are much more like deranged humans who can still mentally function enough to be a real threat. Without spoiling too much of the plot, it is a red pill tale of overcoming life's adversities, beating the demon's of alcohol and depression, not letting your wife and child's deaths beat you down, and bettering your circumstances through aspects of life you can control, such as your property, medical and mechanical knowledge etc. The novel takes place primarily in a deserted US residential suburb (at least during the day), with just enough descriptions of the places Neville visits to get your imagination running whilst pushing the story along.

The first half of the novel is essentially Neville's dialogue with himself, scattered with flashbacks of how life used to be and it is masterfully done. No fluffy emotions, no padding for the sake of padding. My version of the book was a swift 176 page read that I completed in 4 days.

The second half of the book gets real interesting and delves deeper into Neville's psyche. He is clearly a very capable survivor, who literally has his life made. He soundproofs his house to keep the vampires out, he has a plentiful supply of food, he starts to learn about the infectious and why he is immune. Then another two survivors turns up, a woman and a dog. Interestingly, the woman is painted as near angelic, innocent, frightened, a ray of light in Neville's dark world. Temptation. Quite strong symbolism for a sci-fi book. You can guess where it goes next, although the last 2 chapters of the book knock you off balance and wrap things together masterfully. Surprise surprise, the film goes in the complete opposite direction and finishes on a weak ass note of no semblance to the book at all.

It is a fantastic book, and it is a shame that it is by far and away Matheson's best. He hit it out of the park on his first go, and his following books never quite lived up to I am Legend. I highly recommend it for any dystopian / apocalypse sci-fi fans, fiction fans and anyone who wants a first hand example of a really good, action packed story. There are very few handy coincidences; everything in Neville's world has a consequence. Highly recommended.
 

Attachments

Monty_Brogan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
jebwallabingbong said:
I am using this coronavirus downtime/self enforced quarantine to dive head long into my pile of books I have slowly been gathering for the past year. I am a bit of a sci-fi junky, albeit my tastes are for the older novels where social justice is largely absent. One of the most readable and memorable for me was Richard Matheson's I am Legend, which upon reflection seems quite apt given the quarantine situation the world finds itself in. The book is a stone cold sci-fi classic; the SF Masterworks version I got was a joy to read and I love the old timey sci-fi artwork, which captures the mood of the book perfectly.



Add this book to the increasingly long list of Hollyweird movies that piss all over the source material and claim it is a betterment. Literally everything described in the book is opposite in the film. Neville's character is visually a complete 180; the setting is in Manhattan, not a quiet residential suburb and the mystery, the sense of isolation is completely lost. The introduction of characters and their back stories are completely different. The motivations of Neville and his backstory are typical disaster movie farce, driven by Hollywood's obsession with horrible disaster movies and flashy action sequences. The movie, if it was a standalone would be fine; the main issue is that the book is so good it comes off as nothing put a purposeful, pastiche rewrite forcing in the usual sjw crap. Its subtle, but its there.

SPOILERS BELOW......

The book says explicitly that the main character, Robert Neville is a white, long hair, bearded man with an imposing build who has lost his wife and child, everything he loved to a vampiric disease. The main antagnoists are described as vampires but they are much more like deranged humans who can still mentally function enough to be a real threat. Without spoiling too much of the plot, it is a red pill tale of overcoming life's adversities, beating the demon's of alcohol and depression, not letting your wife and child's deaths beat you down, and bettering your circumstances through aspects of life you can control, such as your property, medical and mechanical knowledge etc. The novel takes place primarily in a deserted US residential suburb (at least during the day), with just enough descriptions of the places Neville visits to get your imagination running whilst pushing the story along.

The first half of the novel is essentially Neville's dialogue with himself, scattered with flashbacks of how life used to be and it is masterfully done. No fluffy emotions, no padding for the sake of padding. My version of the book was a swift 176 page read that I completed in 4 days.

The second half of the book gets real interesting and delves deeper into Neville's psyche. He is clearly a very capable survivor, who literally has his life made. He soundproofs his house to keep the vampires out, he has a plentiful supply of food, he starts to learn about the infectious and why he is immune. Then another two survivors turns up, a woman and a dog. Interestingly, the woman is painted as near angelic, innocent, frightened, a ray of light in Neville's dark world. Temptation. Quite strong symbolism for a sci-fi book. You can guess where it goes next, although the last 2 chapters of the book knock you off balance and wrap things together masterfully. Surprise surprise, the film goes in the complete opposite direction and finishes on a weak ass note of no semblance to the book at all.

It is a fantastic book, and it is a shame that it is by far and away Matheson's best. He hit it out of the park on his first go, and his following books never quite lived up to I am Legend. I highly recommend it for any dystopian / apocalypse sci-fi fans, fiction fans and anyone who wants a first hand example of a really good, action packed story. There are very few handy coincidences; everything in Neville's world has a consequence. Highly recommended.
Worth the read if you’ve seen the movie?
 
Monty_Brogan said:
jebwallabingbong said:
I am using this coronavirus downtime/self enforced quarantine to dive head long into my pile of books I have slowly been gathering for the past year. I am a bit of a sci-fi junky, albeit my tastes are for the older novels where social justice is largely absent. One of the most readable and memorable for me was Richard Matheson's I am Legend, which upon reflection seems quite apt given the quarantine situation the world finds itself in. The book is a stone cold sci-fi classic; the SF Masterworks version I got was a joy to read and I love the old timey sci-fi artwork, which captures the mood of the book perfectly.



Add this book to the increasingly long list of Hollyweird movies that piss all over the source material and claim it is a betterment. Literally everything described in the book is opposite in the film. Neville's character is visually a complete 180; the setting is in Manhattan, not a quiet residential suburb and the mystery, the sense of isolation is completely lost. The introduction of characters and their back stories are completely different. The motivations of Neville and his backstory are typical disaster movie farce, driven by Hollywood's obsession with horrible disaster movies and flashy action sequences. The movie, if it was a standalone would be fine; the main issue is that the book is so good it comes off as nothing put a purposeful, pastiche rewrite forcing in the usual sjw crap. Its subtle, but its there.

SPOILERS BELOW......

The book says explicitly that the main character, Robert Neville is a white, long hair, bearded man with an imposing build who has lost his wife and child, everything he loved to a vampiric disease. The main antagnoists are described as vampires but they are much more like deranged humans who can still mentally function enough to be a real threat. Without spoiling too much of the plot, it is a red pill tale of overcoming life's adversities, beating the demon's of alcohol and depression, not letting your wife and child's deaths beat you down, and bettering your circumstances through aspects of life you can control, such as your property, medical and mechanical knowledge etc. The novel takes place primarily in a deserted US residential suburb (at least during the day), with just enough descriptions of the places Neville visits to get your imagination running whilst pushing the story along.

The first half of the novel is essentially Neville's dialogue with himself, scattered with flashbacks of how life used to be and it is masterfully done. No fluffy emotions, no padding for the sake of padding. My version of the book was a swift 176 page read that I completed in 4 days.

The second half of the book gets real interesting and delves deeper into Neville's psyche. He is clearly a very capable survivor, who literally has his life made. He soundproofs his house to keep the vampires out, he has a plentiful supply of food, he starts to learn about the infectious and why he is immune. Then another two survivors turns up, a woman and a dog. Interestingly, the woman is painted as near angelic, innocent, frightened, a ray of light in Neville's dark world. Temptation. Quite strong symbolism for a sci-fi book. You can guess where it goes next, although the last 2 chapters of the book knock you off balance and wrap things together masterfully. Surprise surprise, the film goes in the complete opposite direction and finishes on a weak ass note of no semblance to the book at all.

It is a fantastic book, and it is a shame that it is by far and away Matheson's best. He hit it out of the park on his first go, and his following books never quite lived up to I am Legend. I highly recommend it for any dystopian / apocalypse sci-fi fans, fiction fans and anyone who wants a first hand example of a really good, action packed story. There are very few handy coincidences; everything in Neville's world has a consequence. Highly recommended.
Worth the read if you’ve seen the movie?
Absolutely, the only real similarities between the book and the film are the name of the main character, the antagonists and the disease they are afflicted with
 
I have decided to use the quarantine , to read , as much as I can , on the 2-3 hours i have free when kids are sleeping , the Gospels.

After that I have to finish around 10 books which I have at home , and I am trailing.
It ranges from religion , to Sci-fi/novels , to geopolitics , to some essays.
I will post here when done. I am planning to continue reading after the quarantine ends anyway. Can't believe how much your brain works more and how much more clever you are by reading a book compared to checking something on Jewtube - even clever things.
 

Paracelsus

Crow
Gold Member


Prey, Michael Crichton

I did finish, but only by skipping a fair number of pages towards the end.

I can see why this one didn't sell. Crichton reached too far with the plausibility on this one, let the book descend into too much technobabble, and turned the story into Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Wouldn't really recommend past the first half.

I think there are basically three Crichton novels that are essentials: Jurassic Park (first one only), Rising Sun, and Airframe. If you read those, you've got the best of his work, the rest of it is not quite as focused.
 
I finished reading "The Things They Carried", a collection of related stories by American writer Tim O'Brien about a platoon of American soldiers fighting during the Vietnam War
 
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