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Love and Orgasm by Alexander Lowen. An in-depth analysis of intersexual relationships and why couples cannot find sexual and emotional fulfillment in their relationships. The psychological writing makes the book dry at times, though it seems to be the only work that focuses not on the spiritual or physical aspect only, but on both. The author gives possible causes and solutions to the dysfunctions that plagues modern society. He describes furthermore why effminate men and masculine women exist, where homosexuality originates and how repression of sexuality (not sex) can lead to damaged personalities. It gave me great insight, though it was also frustrating and depressing to read at times because the numerous case examples he mentions are sometimes more than relatable, which makes one reflect about one's past, present, and possible future if you don't get a grip of yourself.
 

Batman_

Woodpecker
I just read "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. Actually, this was the 2nd time I read it.

It basically talks about Buddhism from an evolutionary psychology and neuroscientific framework. It's largely secular and strips down a lot of the metaphysical/supernatural claims and focuses almost entirely on mindfulness/vipassana, while also deconstructing many illusions that cause unnecessary suffering in your life.

Definitely one of the most insightful books I've ever read. I'll probably reread it several more times because it is extremely dense with information and ideas, despite being a fairly short read.
 
The Apocalypse Code: Find out What the Bible Really Says About the End Times and Why It Matters Today
https://www.amazon.com/Apocalypse-Code-Bible-Really-Matters/dp/0849919916
This book is so great for the recovering Protestant. I was born into a "Non-Denominational," Zionist, Protestant, Evangelical family.
  • My step sister became a lesbian, married a woman, artificially impregnated her wife, now divorced
  • My sister became an atheist and a degenerate after high school
  • Parent are boomers ( pls don't ask )

I've seen Protestantism actively become a pipeline toward degeneracy and atheism.

If you believe in the "rapture," please read this book.
Hank converted to Orthodoxy just a few years ago.
Wonderful stuff.
 
”Dune”.

Decided to reread it for the first time in five or six years, after learning that a new, supposedly more faithful to the book movie is coming out next year.

It was very different from what I remember, despite this being perhaps the fourth time I've read the book in the past 25 years. I recall the story focusing more on the Fremen revolt and the shenanigans of the Harkonnens and Bene Gesserit than on Muad-dib’s awakening. Or more precisely, that there was more story in those areas than there was. That the Emperor and Mohiam had larger roles, as well, but aside from the latter appearing in the ”gom jabbar" scene near the beginning, they are completely absent until the very end. The end itself seemed rushed, particularly after the arrival of Gurney Halleck.

And I still don't get the obsession with Duncan Idaho. He's the Boba Fett of the Dune universe.

Having not seen the David Lynch adaptation in 20 years, it surprised me both how much of my mental image of the people and settings were influenced by that film (despite having read the book first), and how Lynch managed to derive what he did from the source material.

It's still a great book, and it's studded with interesting aphorisms, but it was hard not to feel a little disappointment that it wasn't what I remembered.
I look forward to the upcoming HBO series about the Bene Gesserit... I always wanted one as a concubine... : ) And the big budget film comes out this December!
 
Bang Colombia
[Sorry. Roosh, I'm aware of the fact that your lifestyle and values changed since the time it had been written, but that is still a good reading].
 
I just read "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. Actually, this was the 2nd time I read it.
I am halfway through Robert Wrights The Moral Animal which is turning into one of my to 10 books of all time

Sample

Consider the sexual double standard. The most obvious Darwinian
explanation is that men were designed, on the one hand, to be sexually
loose themselves yet, on the other, to relegate sexually loose women
("whores") to low moral status — even, remarkably, as those same men
encourage those same women to be sexually loose. Thus, to the extent that
men shape the moral code, it may include a double standard. Yet on closer
inspection, this quintessentially male judgment is seen to draw natural
support from other circles: the parents of young, pretty girls, who
encourage their daughters to save their favors for Mr. Right (that is, to
remain attractive targets for male parental investment), and who tell their
daughters it's "wrong" to do otherwise; the daughters themselves, who,
while saving their virtue for a high bidder, self-servingly and moralistically
disparage the competing, low-rent alternatives; happily married women
who consider an atmosphere of promiscuity a clear and present danger to
their marriage (that is, to continued high investment in their offspring).
There is a virtual genetic conspiracy to depict sexually loose women as
evil. Meanwhile, there is relative tolerance for male philandering, and not
only because some males (especially attractive or rich ones) may
themselves like the idea. Wives, too, by finding a husband's
desertion more shattering than his mere infidelity, reinforce the double
standard.
 

Batman_

Woodpecker
I am halfway through Robert Wrights The Moral Animal which is turning into one of my to 10 books of all time

Sample
I definitely need to re-read that as well, it is pretty much the holy grail of evolutionary psychology. I'd definitely check out Buddhism is True next, at least the first half, because he uses the same Darwinian logic to attempt to explain the human condition, it's a fascinating read.
 
House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski.

Was blown away by this book, which in my opinion is about a young mans descent into schizophrenia.
 

Waverer

Sparrow
I just read "Why Buddhism is True" by Robert Wright. Actually, this was the 2nd time I read it.

It basically talks about Buddhism from an evolutionary psychology and neuroscientific framework. It's largely secular and strips down a lot of the metaphysical/supernatural claims and focuses almost entirely on mindfulness/vipassana, while also deconstructing many illusions that cause unnecessary suffering in your life.

Definitely one of the most insightful books I've ever read. I'll probably reread it several more times because it is extremely dense with information and ideas, despite being a fairly short read.
I love Wright (The Moral Animal is one of my favourite ever books) so I started it and found it very persuasive - while also getting a bit bored by some of the lengthy descriptions of Buddhist rituals like meditations. How have you behaved or lived differently because you read it, if at all? I worry I lack the patience and attention span to meditate.
 

Waverer

Sparrow
I read What Makes Us Girls by YouTube star Britanny Sellner (nee Pettibone) last week. As the title suggests, it's aimed at women, but I don't think any of its important messages are worth only women reading. Compared to her YouTubes it's not very political, but that makes it more relevant to everyday life in a way. She writes about the mistakes we make in relationships with others and how we can avoid them with humility and kindness. It's the kind of book that, if a girl liked, I would think more of the girl.
 
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Batman_

Woodpecker
I love Wright (The Moral Animal is one of my favourite ever books) so I started it and found it very persuasive - while also getting a bit bored by some of the lengthy descriptions of Buddhist rituals like meditations. How have you behaved or lived differently because you read it, if at all? I worry I lack the patience and attention span to meditate.
I had already built up a solid foundation of the more secular parts of Buddhism and meditation already, so this book just helped me bring it to a modern framework. By in large it has greatly reduced worry, regret, and other emotional afflictions that are caused by an unchecked mind.

It's definitely very hard to meditate, though some people are more inclined towards it than others. I am trying to build a habit by doing small amounts and increasing it very slowly over time ie 5 min per day, then 10 min per day a couple months later, etc. I'd check out Sam Harris' podcasts with Joseph Goldstein, I think the mirrors are still up on youtube.
 

ABeast

Sparrow
The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. Fascinating read that sheds light on the reasons behind the war for independence. Franklin got himself involved in the defense of the colonies from French and allied Indians and saw how the British were flubbing it while simultaneously working against their own efforts to defend themselves. "Taxation without representation" takes on a real meaning when you realize that the taxation was for necessary defense and the lack of representation meant that they had no say in how the defense was organized.
 

MRAll134

Robin
I just finished Scott Adam's "How to Fail at Almost Everything and Still Win Big." It took me six months to get through it, even though the writing is very easy to comprehend. The book offered Boomer takes on exercise, nutrition, psychology and persuasion. I actually don't recommend this book and I put in a downstairs laundry room, which acts as a mini-swap meet - in the apartment complex.

This is Adam's best rated book. But, it is a painfully boring read.
 

Mithras

Newbie
Coup D'etat: The Technique of Revolution by Curzio Malaparte.

A very rare book, which was unpleasant for both Mussolini and Hitler, written by a contemporary observer of the Bolshevik and Fascist Revolution. The book was banned in Fascist Italy and Malaparte, who was a member of the Fascist party, was sent to exile. Among other things, he called Mussolini to be a student of Marxism who engineered a successful coup. Malaparte noticed and pointed out the main patterns of all big revolutions of the first half of the 20th century. In his own words: "the problem of the conquest and defense of the State is not a political one ... it is a technical problem".

The best example was the Bolshevik revolution, arranged by Lenin and Trotsky, which was an inspiration, in many aspects, for other modern revolutions. The point is that in the modern conditions of unlimited quantity, a small group of highly effective individuals can conquer state and even empire only with the right technique that is adapted for the general condition of the country. The apparent advantage of the state - its economical, technological, and military power - is at the same time its disadvantage, and Lenin and Trotsky were the first ones who understood that and successfully took advantage of it. The Bolshevik revolution wasn't a spontaneous uprising of the workers, so mythologized by Soviet propaganda, but the precisely calculated event that was performed in its core by a small hit squad, consisting of thousand workmen, soldiers, and sailors, led by Trotsky. One thing is clear - any revolution that pretends to be "revolution coming from the people" is an intentional untruth because people as a passive part is just a physical fuel used by authors of the revolution, an active part that is at the same time the brain of the revolution.

The book is concerned with revolutions of the 20th century which were still performed by brute-force attacks and it would be very interesting to explore revolutionary conditions of the current digitalized world of international plutocracy when masses are even easier to be manipulated.
 
American Gods by Neil Gaiman is the most recent book I've read, along with Book of Pook, which I probably can't discuss here.

I came across the paperback in a free book station and was curious due to the short-term buzz from the black community because the TV series had a scene with an African God inciting a slave ship riot. This scene was not in the book as far as I recollect.

I can say Gaiman portrayed an intriguing world of Americana with great detail given to overlooked environments and pockets of the rural North. He did his homework with folklore and psychology as well. The plot wasn't half bad either.

At around 600 pages, American Gods engages with the above elements mentioned, though I nitpick at the basic writing style. The main character, Shadow, is strong and manly, and his curt nature honors this authenticity. This made the TV version boring, but is offset by the brilliant Ian McShane as Odin.

Overall I highly recommend the novel, as you should breeze through it in these times. I heard a lot about Neil Gaiman and was impressed in unexpected ways, namely the wit and detail. This is coming from someone who once consumed Stephen King and Anne Rice.
 
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