Whenever you finish a book, post it here

Batman_

Kingfisher
Recently read A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine and How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life by Massimo Pigliucci.

If you resonate with Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, or are interested in a philosophy of life, I highly recommend these two books, especially the one by Ivrine. Both books are only about 250 pages but they contain almost no fluff; they are straight to the point, no nonsense, very dense with information; they contain page after page of sage advice, wisdom, and insight. I will probably re-read of both of them many times because they are not the type of book to read lightly or quickly.
 
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MRAll134

Kingfisher
I just finished Jonathan Haidt's "The Coddling of the American Mind." This is a psychological look at how screens e.g. tv, iPads are altering children and their psyches for the worse. It also looks at how children are not being allowed "free play," without adult supervision and this is leading to higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicide. Some of the sections deal with the addictive nature of social media and how access is especially hurting young girls.

Overall, I liked this book. It took me a few months to finish it, but this is because I am usually reading 4-5 books at once. This is definitely a book for future parents, or those with young children. Thumbs up :like:
 

Batman_

Kingfisher
I just finished Jonathan Haidt's "The Coddling of the American Mind." This is a psychological look at how screens e.g. tv, iPads are altering children and their psyches for the worse. It also looks at how children are not being allowed "free play," without adult supervision and this is leading to higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicide. Some of the sections deal with the addictive nature of social media and how access is especially hurting young girls.

Overall, I liked this book. It took me a few months to finish it, but this is because I am usually reading 4-5 books at once. This is definitely a book for future parents, or those with young children. Thumbs up :like:

He's been on Joe Rogan at least once, I've been meaning to check it out because I've heard he has a lot of interesting insight to share.
 

MRAll134

Kingfisher
He's been on Joe Rogan at least once, I've been meaning to check it out because I've heard he has a lot of interesting insight to share.

He is definitely a big brain and well educated. Haidt does not really incorporate theology in this writing. But, I have C.S. Lewis and others for that. :)

Let me know if you read any of his other books. "The Righteous Mind" and "The Happiness Hypothesis" sound interesting.
 

jeffinjapan

Pigeon
Just finished the "Song of the Sirin" by Nicholas Kotar. It's book one of a five part epic fantasy series based on Russian fairy tales. I was never an epic fantasy kinda guy, but after watching his interview (Nicholas Kotar) over at Brother Augustin's YouTube channel, I decide to give it a go; glad I did. Just started reading book two of the series.
 

Yootoo

Newbie
The Song of the Sirin (Raven Son Book 1) by Nicolas Kotar
I watched dn. Kotar on Michel Wilcoffs channel and he seems like a great guy influenced by Dostoyevsky, C S Luis, Tolkien. So i decided to check out his fantasy series.
And the fist book is great deep world and character, you can feel the Christian undertones even if its a fantasy world. No power fantasy bs, really nice good vs evil story for now. Im gona wait for his next book to become audio, but for anyone wanting some good fantasy go check it out. :like:
 

kel

Pelican
Bastille day was just a few days ago. Can someone recommend a book (or, I suppose, documentary, podcast, etc.) with a slightly more nuanced look at the French Revolution? I've just started looking into it recently and it's kinda fascinating how heavy handed the narrative is around that versus the much messier reality.
 

animum-rege

Sparrow
Recently read A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine and How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life by Massimo Pigliucci.

If you resonate with Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, or are interested in a philosophy of life, I highly recommend these two books, especially the one by Ivrine. Both books are only about 250 pages but they contain almost no fluff; they are straight to the point, no nonsense, very dense with information; they contain page after page of sage advice, wisdom, and insight. I will probably re-read of both of them many times because they are not the type of book to read lightly or quickly.

Those two books are excellent!

Another work on Stoicism that I quite enjoyed recently is How to Think like a Roman Emperor by Donald Robertson. He adds a more storytelling around Marcus's life (a bit embellished for effect) to deepen our understanding around the Meditations. I really enjoyed it, especially because Meditations exists in this kind of fragmentary vacuum — it sketches a picture of Marcus, the man.

My contribution: just finished The Age of Entitlement by Christopher Caldwell. Highly recommended. It is a very prescient book for this time; he sketches out a very compelling history of how the well-intentioned Civil Rights act created a legal and bureaucratic framework that has been exploited by globalists to this day.

Critical insight:

Both kinds of minority, elite ones and marginalized ones, live under threat from democratic majorities, and benefit in the same way from laws passed to contain majority power.
 

redbeard

Hummingbird
Moderator
I just finished Jonathan Haidt's "The Coddling of the American Mind." This is a psychological look at how screens e.g. tv, iPads are altering children and their psyches for the worse. It also looks at how children are not being allowed "free play," without adult supervision and this is leading to higher rates of depression, anxiety and even suicide. Some of the sections deal with the addictive nature of social media and how access is especially hurting young girls.

Overall, I liked this book. It took me a few months to finish it, but this is because I am usually reading 4-5 books at once. This is definitely a book for future parents, or those with young children. Thumbs up :like:
Great recommendation, thanks. I watched him on JRE a while back and it was a fantastic listen.
 
Shadow State: Murder, Mayhem and Russia’s Remaking of the West

By Luke Harding

shadow state.jpg

It is not as detailed as some books about Putin and his regime, but it does cover a great deal of territory about the Russian kleptocracy.
 

PixelFree

Kingfisher
Recently read A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine and How to Be a Stoic: Using Ancient Philosophy to Live a Modern Life by Massimo Pigliucci.

If you resonate with Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, or are interested in a philosophy of life, I highly recommend these two books, especially the one by Ivrine. Both books are only about 250 pages but they contain almost no fluff; they are straight to the point, no nonsense, very dense with information; they contain page after page of sage advice, wisdom, and insight. I will probably re-read of both of them many times because they are not the type of book to read lightly or quickly.

I can second A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine.

I was looking for something easier to digest than reading Meditations itself and this was great.

No fluff, interesting history and lots of helpful examples and metaphors.

The first couple of chapters describing each school can be a little slow at the start but overall the book is awesome.
 
Seablindness: How Political Neglect Is Choking American Seapower

By Seth Cropsey


sea.jpg

The scary/sad thing to me about this warning to America, is that so much taxpayer money is spent by the military industrial complex, with nothing to show for it... The author is a former Deputy Undersecretary of the Navy, from the Reagan years...

A review of the book that caused me to track it down...

 

Batman_

Kingfisher
I can second A Guide to the Good Life: The Ancient Art of Stoic Joy by William B. Irvine.

I was looking for something easier to digest than reading Meditations itself and this was great.

No fluff, interesting history and lots of helpful examples and metaphors.

The first couple of chapters describing each school can be a little slow at the start but overall the book is awesome.
I thought the beginning was fascinating, especially the contrast between the greek and roman stoics. What a time to live in, where philosophical education is highly valued, and the schools all compete with each other in an almost capitalist fashion.
 
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PixelFree

Kingfisher
I thought the beginning was fascinating, especially the contrast between the greek and roman stoics. What a time to live in, where philosophical education is highly valued, and the schools all compete with each other in an almost capitalist fashion.

It was very interested to learn how families would sent their sons to philosophy school back early in Western civilisation. Made me think of what I want to do with my future kids.

Also, made me think of some business ideas. E.g. if I wanted to send my kids to some kind of extra-curricular program to learn about debate, reason, entrepreneurship, life, philosophy, etc - what is available?
 
Just finished “The Temptation Of St. Anthony,” a novel by Gustave Flaubert about one night in the hermit’s life. It took him 30 years to write and he clearly did a deep dive on basically all of Christian and pagan philosophy in order to create such a masterpiece.

I just downloaded the ebook and started reading it now.

The prose is masterfully well written and it's very imaginative without being just another pretentious, artsy-fartsy piece of nonsense like most books.

The content is heavy with profound messages based around overcoming various temptations.

The story so far is different from The Labyrinth of the World and the Paradise of the Heart, but it is deep and pulls the reader into a spiritual realm in much the same way.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Malachi Martin should know about demons, he is one of the biggest traitors to the Church, and was a major operator in subverting the American Catholic Church for the benefit of the AJC/ADL, who funded him. He was exposed by E. Michael Jones:



This is a bit of a derail.

What does this have to do with his account of personal experience with exorcisms? Do you have any proof that he gets his theology wrong in the book?

I found this book valuable.

I am still on the fence about Martin, as he has his defenders too, like Bernard Jantzen of Canada, who believes most of the accusations against Martin are a coordinated smear campaign.

From what I remember, Jones and his other critics deal with a lot of gossip and insinuation and are pretty thin when it comes to clear evidence.

Like I said though, I am on the fence about this issue, and learned a lot from the hours and hours of interviews Martin did with Art Bell which are available on Youtube, so unless there is proof that his explanations of the demonic and Catholic theology are incorrect, the accusations that he was a Jewish agent are a derail when it comes to the subject of this book.

The fact that you're on the fence about this traitor scumbag illustrates the kind of damage people like Martin have done to Boomers, who were turned into new agers to the bone. The guy was a bona fide paid agent of the AJC and Bnai Brith, conspiring to undermine the Catholic church.

In his 2007 book Spiritual Radical: Abraham Joshua Heschel in America, Edward K. Kaplan confirmed that Martin cooperated with the American Jewish Committee during the Council "for a mixture of motives, both lofty and ignoble ... [He] primarily advised the committee on theological issues, but he also provided logistical intelligence and copies of restricted documents." It is confirmed in the book that Martin used the pseudonyms Forest and Pushkin.[11] Kaplan acknowledges that the kiss and tell book about the internal workings of the Council, The Pilgrim by Michael Serafian, was requested from Martin by Abraham J. Heschel, who arranged for the book to be published by Roger W. Straus, Jr.'s Farrar, Straus and Giroux printing company. It was published in the hope that it would influence the deliberations in the council.

During the Second Vatican Council, Martin acted as an assistant and translator to Cardinal Augustin Bea, head of the Secretariat for the Promotion of Christian Unity (SPCU). At the time, a major focus of the SPCU was the Jewish declaration portion of Nostra Aetate, the Vatican II document that addressed the Church’s relations with other religions. Cardinal Bea would later be referred to by Archbishop Lefebvre as an “instrument of betrayal.”

In January of 1966, Look Magazine ran an article entitled “How the Jews Changed Catholic Thinking,” a lengthy, in-depth look at the influence various Jewish lobbying groups had over the final draft of Nostra Aetate. In the article, Senior Editor Joseph Roddy tells of an unnamed Jesuit priest who held a key position in Rome during the time the Second Vatican Council was in session. The priest, described as a “double agent who “could never turn down work” and a “savior in the diaspora,” would use his position to gather and disseminate inside information to the secular press and the Jewish lobbying groups, who would in turn use that information in their efforts to influence the Council fathers – particularly the progressive American bishops. Although the priest’s actual name is withheld, several pseudonyms he used for his various activities are revealed.

As “Michael Serafian,” he wrote “The Pilgrim” (Ferrar, Straus & Giroux, 1964), a tell-all book on the politics, key figures and inner dealings of the council. As “F.E. Cartus,” he penned two timely articles, one for Harper’s Magazine and one for the American Jewish Committee’s influential intellectual periodical “Commentary.” As “Pushkin,” he would feed “inside tips and tactical leaks,” often in the form of notes slipped under doors, to journalists of major media organizations.

This all took place many years before Malachi Martin became a cult figure and public author who wrote books under his own name. Although word began to get around in certain circles that Martin and the pen-names were one in the same, it wasn’t until 5 years after he left Rome, when he wrote “The Encounter” (Ferrar, Straus & Giroux), that the first solid nexus was made between Martin and the double-agent priest. On the back cover of The Encounter, it states clearly that Malachi Martin did indeed write “The Pilgrim” under the pseudonym Michael Serafian.

Despite the indisputable self-admission that Michael Serafian was Martin’s pen name, many of his devoted fans would claim that there was no evidence that he was the mole priest identified in the Look article who wrote for the American Jewish Committee and used his position in Rome to pass sensitive information to the press. What follows, will indisputably show not only that Martin was the double-agent priest in the Look article, but that the “warm friendship with the AJC” described by Joe Roddy was far warmer than anyone, including Roddy, had suspected.

The documents referenced below were made available to AQ by the Manuscripts Department of the New York Public Library. They are part of the Ferrar, Straus & Giroux collection, which contains correspondence and documentation on the publishing company’s dealings with many of its authors. They are available to any and all. None have been altered in any way shape or form.

THE DOCUMENTS

Exhibit A: Setting up the Swiss bank account – This memo, dated March 19, 1964 was written by FSG treasurer Robert Wohlforth (RW) and sent to Robert Straus (RWS). Roger Straus was the president of Ferrar, Straus and Giroux and the sole heir to the Guggenheim fortune. The memo describes a discussion the two had regarding “The Pilgrim contract” and what steps needed to be taken to set up a Swiss bank account.

Exhibit B: Zachariah Shuster receives royalty payments from Martin’s book, “The Pilgrim” – A Ferrar, Straus and Giroux royalty statement listing payouts and deductions for The Pilgrim. Instead of the payee being the author of the book, Malachi Martin (aka Michael Serafian), the payee is Zachariah Shuster of the American Jewish Committee.

Exhibit C: Zachariah Shuster wonders where the check is – Zachariah Shuster of the American Jewish Committee writes a letter to FS&G treasurer wondering why a check that was destined for a Swiss bank account hasn’t yet arrived. He follows up with a confirmation then receives a response from Ferrar, Straus and Giroux treasurer Robert Wohlforth. Of interest are several hand-written notations showing the letters are in reference to Serafian. As the ledger linked at exhibit H shows, the amount of the check is $1,000.

Exhibit D: Martin’s services are requested by the AJC – Here we have Marc Tanenbaum, Director of Interreligious Affairs for the AJC, accepting a gracious offer from Roger Straus to use Malachi Martin as he sees fit. Tanenbaum thinks the idea is a good one, stating that “Serafian (Martin) could provide a genuine service if he were to deal with the crucial issue of the deicide problem…” Although the hoped for late summer deadline would not be met, in the January 1965 issue of the AJC publication, Commentary, Martin, as F.E. Cartus, writes an article entitled “Vatican II and the Jews,” At the beginning of the third paragraph, it reads in part as follows:

“Roman Catholic believers drew a whole range of practical conclusions from these premises. The Jews as a people-not only the Jews of Christ’s time but Jews of all time-were guilty of having killed Christ, the God-man: theologically speaking, they were deicides.”

Martin writes the article as requested and even fabricates a statement on the Jews that he attributes to Pope John XXIII, claiming it was written shortly before his death and was to be read on a set date in all Catholic Churches worldwide. That story HERE.

Also of note is Tanenbaum referring to three “secret memoranda” submitted by the AJC to Cardinal Bea.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
(contn'd)
Exhibit E: Robert Straus receives Martin’s assignment from the AJC – Robert Straus acknowledges receiving Tanenbaum’s letter and notes that he simultaneously had received the assignment for “The Pilgrim” to write the article for the AJC publication.

Exhibit F: Roger Straus wants to discuss Martin with Podhorez – Roger Straus wishes to discuss a letter from Michael Serafian (Malachi Martin) with Norman Podhorez, the editor of Commentary – the publication where the article was to appear. It’s unclear what is meant when Straus states they should discuss the matter as a “possible post mortem.” Perhaps he was referring to the fact that the hoped for timeframe of late summer couldn’t be met.

Exhibit G: Straus makes undeniable connection between Martin and F.E. Cartus – Roger Straus writes to a British publisher telling him to look for an article by pseudonym Michael Serafian (Martin) that will appear in the September 1965 issue of Harper’s Magazine. As promised, an article by F.E. Cartus entitled “The Vatican Council Ends – Reform on borrowed time?” by F.E. Cartus appears in the September edition of Harpers.

Exhibit H: An ledger with interesting transactions – A ledger that was created to show “actual payments to or in (sic) behalf of Michael Serafian,” offers some interesting insights. On line 1, it shows the check sent to Zachariah Shuster on June 25, 1964 (see Exhibit C). On line 3, it shows the net royalty payment that is shown on line 29 of the document at Exhibit B. On line 2, it shows another payment to Zachariah Shuster that does not have any corresponding documentation in the FS&G collection. On line 5, it shows a payment of $500 to Abe Karlikow. Abe Karlikow was the director of the American Jewish Committee’s European office, based in Paris, France. On line 9, it shows Martin’s last payment as being on June 7, 1965. Just a few weeks later, on June 24, 1965, Martin would receive a $7,350 (around $48,000 in 2007 dollars) fellowship grant from the Harry F. Guggenheim foundation. The founder of that foundation, Harry Frank Guggenheim, just so happens to be Roger Straus’ uncle on his mother’s side.

In Summary

There is no doubt whatsoever that the double agent described in the Look article by Joseph Roddy was in fact Malachi Martin. The document at exhibit G undeniably ties Michael Serafian – who is undeniably Malachi Martin – to the F.E Cartus pseudonym.

Zachariah Shuster and Abe Kalikow were receiving payments on Martin’s behalf that were laundered through a Swiss bank account set up specifically for that purpose. Marc Tanenbaum requested custom propaganda for the AJC periodical “Commentary,” which Martin happily provided. Shuster and Kalikow were attached to the European office of the AJC in Paris, France, which just so happens to be where Martin fled to after he left Rome.

Martin was paid well for his services. According to the Straus ledger (exhibit H), during the latter half of 1964, he received a total of $3,651.03. According to the Federal Reserve consumer price index calculator, that would equal $24,202.80 in 2007 dollars. In the first half of 1965, he received $4,282.85, which works out to $27,940.50 in 2007 dollars. Immediately after receiving his last payment from Straus in June of ’65, Martin receives a grant from Straus’ uncle’s foundation for $7,350 or $47,950 adjusted to 2007. In fairness to Martin, it must be noted that he took that grant in monthly payments over 15 months following the time it was awarded to him. The fact remains however, in the year’s time that spanned from June of ’64 and June of ’65, Martin was paid, granted, or received on his behalf at least $100,000 adjusted for inflation. This sum only includes what has been documented by AQ as being paid from Guggenheim and FS&G from in that one year span. It does not include other payments, if any, from Guggenheim and FS&G that AQ doesn’t have a record of. It does not include any payments Martin would have received for writing the articles for Commentary and Harpers. It does not include any other possible income sources. In the summer of 1963, Robert Kaiser claims that Martin “always had a wallet was stuffed with hundred dollar bills,” that he believed was provided by the AJC. In any case, he most certainly didn’t do the AJC’s bidding for free. It’s more than safe to assume that Martin had income aside from that which AQ has been able to document 40 years after the fact. "

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Malachi Martin got his 30 pieces of silver from the AJC to drive the Vatican II stake through the heart of the Catholic Church.
 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
Shadow State: Murder, Mayhem and Russia’s Remaking of the West

By Luke Harding

1596301307349.jpeg

It is not as detailed as some books about Putin and his regime, but it does cover a great deal of territory about the Russian kleptocracy.


This is a book written by this guy here, Guardian journalist:



This is his other book on Russia:



Harding also covered up Clinton corruption and naked neocon plans and the Benghazi murder in his other book "Libya: Murder in Benghazi and the Fall of Gaddafi".

This guy is a POS leftie globohomo disinfo agent, his work is trash. His deep state backers hate Putin with a passion because they have hated the great Orthodox Christian nation of Russia for many generations.

Putin has built 25,000 churches in Russia, and honored true Russian patriots like Solzhenitsyn.

This is the real story of modern Russia, the real collusion to rape and plunder that nation with the same intent the Bolsheviks did 100 years ago, and the cauldron from which Putin emerged as a savior to his nation:

 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
The fact that you're on the fence about this traitor scumbag illustrates the kind of damage people like Martin have done to Boomers, who were turned into new agers to the bone. The guy was a bona fide paid agent of the AJC and Bnai Brith, conspiring to undermine the Catholic church.

I'm already quoting you in my signature and you are digging up old posts to flip out over?

You just can't make some people happy.
 
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