Whenever you finish a book, post it here

This is a book written by this guy here, Guardian journalist:



This is his other book on Russia:



Harding also covered up Clinton corruption and naked neocon plans and the Benghazi murder in his other book "Libya: Murder in Benghazi and the Fall of Gaddafi".

This guy is a POS leftie globohomo disinfo agent, his work is trash. His deep state backers hate Putin with a passion because they have hated the great Orthodox Christian nation of Russia for many generations.

Putin has built 25,000 churches in Russia, and honored true Russian patriots like Solzhenitsyn.

This is the real story of modern Russia, the real collusion to rape and plunder that nation with the same intent the Bolsheviks did 100 years ago, and the cauldron from which Putin emerged as a savior to his nation:


"This is the real story of modern Russia, the real collusion to rape and plunder that nation with the same intent the Bolsheviks did 100 years ago, and the cauldron from which Putin emerged as a savior to his nation:"

I will be the first to say that the oligarchs (I believe all but one were Jewish) basically sliced up the resources of Russia, after the fall of the Soviet Union, as if it were a big pizza. Yes, Putin did stand up to them, and put those few he allowed to remain, firmly under the thumb of the state. And to this day, many average Russians like him for having put them in their place. *But,* on the other hand, Putin runs the country as if he were a mafia godfather, and modern Russia is a poorly functioning kleptocracy. Experts estimate that Putin may have squirreled away around 200 billion dollars in money and company shares, during his on-going time spent running the nation! The current Russian middle class and the rising generation are fed up with the economic and social stagnation of Putin's government, and that is why they are willing to risk so much, by at times protesting in the streets.
 

tsp216

Newbie
Logos Rising - History of Ultimate Reality - E. M. Jones

great read. Sometimes a little metaphysics-heavy, but someone with basic philosophy knowledge can probably understand it. Traces history of metaphysical development from Ancient Greece to early 80s (Thomism in Notre Dame, U Chicago,...). Goes through both Logos' role (or lack thereof) in Islam and Science as well. A lot of discussion re/ the relationship between Protestantism, particularly Luther, and Hegel and German Enlightenment
 

JayR

Woodpecker
"The Sun Also Rises." Hemingway's first novel. Semi-autobiographical, tells the story of a group of Hemingway's artist- and writer-friends visiting beautiful places in post-WWI France and Spain, going to bullfights, and drinking copious amounts of top-shelf booze.

Considered by many to be Hemingway's greatest work, but I found it a bit boring. I recall enjoying his "The Old Man and the Sea" a lot more.
 

kel

Pelican
The Sun Also Rises is 100% atmosphere and mood. It was the first book I read high - not to be too enhancement smoker, but just mentioning, because in that mindset (which is risky) I felt I was really able to appreciate it, just lay back and kinda float in the prose and setting. Took forever because I'd read a page and then space out just imagining rural spain in the interwar years.
 

Grow Bag

Sparrow
The Flashman books are nothing short of being a bona fide gift to Mankind. I'd urge any man to pick them all up in physical form before they are banned (I'm certain this will happen). They entertain, but educate in equal measure.
I highly recommend Fraser's war memoir, Quartered Safe Here: A Harrowing Tale of WW2. I haven't read any Flashman books, but after reading that excellent book I most certainly will. He's an unapologetic man's man.
 
Just finished Father Spyridon's Orthodoxy and the Kingdom of Satan. Good book. I've been researching conspiracy facts for a while and this book was able to introduce me to some new information. I'll have to get more by him, as I finished the Ancient Path recently too.
 

Atlas

Robin
"Sex Trouble: Essays on Radical Feminism and the War Against Human Nature" by Robert Stacy Mccain


Exposes the nefarious roots of lesbianism, psychosis, paganism and abortion in Second Wave Feminism as well as the origins of what he's titled, the 'Feminist-Industrial Complex' responsible for Women Studies curriculum as seen in universities today. Nearly all of the feminists he writes about inevitably embrace feminism and abandon their families to be with a lesbian lover. He quotes feminist writers and highlights their most glossed over and esoteric ideas; these were the most mind-boggling to me:

- Sally Gearhart's plan for male depopulation to a precise 10%. Furthermore, embryonic eugenics designed to increase female births in order to secure a sexless androgynous society.

- Andrea Dworkin's insistence for the destruction of the nuclear family and the eradication of the 'incest taboo'.

-Joyce Treblicot's idea women's reinterpretation of past sexual experiences to frame advances and interactions with men as conducive to the patriarchy and the implication that no true feminist can be heterosexual.


He also quotes Pat Robertson in the penultimate chapter which would've worked better as an introduction and/or summary:

The feminist agenda is not about equal rights for women. It is about a socialist, anti-family political movement that encourages women to leave their husbands, kill their children, practice witchcraft, destroy capitalism and become lesbians.

Quick read, Highly Recommend
 

Yootoo

Newbie
I highly recommend Fraser's war memoir, Quartered Safe Here: A Harrowing Tale of WW2. I haven't read any Flashman books, but after reading that excellent book I most certainly will. He's an unapologetic man's man.
Flashman is one of my favourite series of all, Flashman in a scoundrel true and true, constantly in the jaws of deadly peril.
And the history is on point the only fiction(from what i can garter) is our man Flahsy in the middle of it.
 
Flashman is one of my favourite series of all, Flashman in a scoundrel true and true, constantly in the jaws of deadly peril.
And the history is on point the only fiction(from what i can garter) is our man Flahsy in the middle of it.

I just found out that there was a Flashman film made back in the seventies! Lol I had no idea... I have never read one of the novels, but I get the impression it could make for a good HBO or Showtime series.

The Flashman character was obviously the inspiration for the Warhammer 40K series character, Commissar Ciaphas Cain. It is basically Flashman, in a science fantasy universe, getting into the same sort of trouble, and sneakily worming his way out of it.

 

Pendleton

Kingfisher
"This is the real story of modern Russia, the real collusion to rape and plunder that nation with the same intent the Bolsheviks did 100 years ago, and the cauldron from which Putin emerged as a savior to his nation:"

I will be the first to say that the oligarchs (I believe all but one were Jewish) basically sliced up the resources of Russia, after the fall of the Soviet Union, as if it were a big pizza. Yes, Putin did stand up to them, and put those few he allowed to remain, firmly under the thumb of the state. And to this day, many average Russians like him for having put them in their place. *But,* on the other hand, Putin runs the country as if he were a mafia godfather, and modern Russia is a poorly functioning kleptocracy. Experts estimate that Putin may have squirreled away around 200 billion dollars in money and company shares, during his on-going time spent running the nation! The current Russian middle class and the rising generation are fed up with the economic and social stagnation of Putin's government, and that is why they are willing to risk so much, by at times protesting in the streets.

Well, the top 12 "American" oligarchs now have $1 trillion. If we had to give up $200 billion to get a right wing, traditionalist strong man to replace the oligarchs, I would say it was a good investment.
 

Vienna

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Just finished The Plague by Albert Camus. In many ways a sublime book, with beautiful prose. While I do not agree with Camus’ absurdist view that human life is inherently devoid of meaning, I’d wholeheartedly recommend the book to anyone interested in reading a classic about the human condition. I’m still way to young to fully appreciate the many layers of the book, so I look forward to revisiting it in the future.
 
Just finished Little house on the Prairie and before that Little House in the Big Woods by Laura Ingalls Wilder. Not as high brow as some of the stuff in this forum but I am reading it with my 4 year old. The books took place after the civil war, which is when I believe the Oligarchs took over. Charles and Caroline were the last generation of Great Americans. They just don’t make people like that anymore. Reading it makes you mourn for what was lost, and yearn for simpler times.
 

Yootoo

Newbie
I just found out that there was a Flashman film made back in the seventies! Lol I had no idea... I have never read one of the novels, but I get the impression it could make for a good HBO or Showtime series.

The Flashman character was obviously the inspiration for the Warhammer 40K series character, Commissar Ciaphas Cain. It is basically Flashman, in a science fantasy universe, getting into the same sort of trouble, and sneakily worming his way out of it.

Never watched the movie. But it can make a good series no doubt, if sharpe's company can make it so can Flashman.
But not in the current political leanings of publishers,Flashman is the antitheses of everything they stand for.
 
Top