Whenever you finish a book, post it here

Ok i have read some books.

Lets start with the best.
An Exact Exposition of the Orthodox Faith by Sn, John of Damascus
Really great summary of lots of theological points short explanations with to much fuss, you still need some understading of theological terms tho, its not the most beginner friendly book, but its too hard.

Marcovaldo by Italo Calvino
Great short story collection about Marcovaldo a worker in an Italian city, its funny at times and dream like at others, Marcovaldo is trying his best for his family but almost nothing goes his way.
If you have not read Calvino i recommend you try some of his more famous works who are allot more unreal like, invisible citys, he has a really distinct style and you can easily be facilitated with his books.

The magic mountain by Tomas Man
Man that is a slow book, and its full on esoteric at that, Tomas Man even rerecords you read it 2 times ones as you know knowing the second as you know its and esoteric initiation. Honestly it was too much for me. It has its moments and interesting characters but its not an easy read.

The Imagineers of War: The Untold Story of DARPA, the Pentagon Agency That Changed the World
Im not sure its the best darpa book but it an semi official history, so no real conspiracy stuff in there but all officially acknowledged stuff are presumably in. I lead allot about darpa and what it is, its not the best read it repeat itself quit often, eh its ok.

1-5 Malazan books by Erikson
Its one of the fist fantasy series i read, just because a friend of mine was talking to me how fantasy is the best.
Its fantasy and it gets worse as it goes, but the world and magic are interesting, its great prtyal of what a completely pantheistic world would look like god consonantly bickering and fighting for power, humans and things trying to become gods, no clear good and evil, just some semblance of some power that balances thing.


Vouching for Malazan as well. Hands down the best world building and character building i've experienced in a fantasy series. very difficult read, the author basically throws you in the midlde of the story and makes you figure stuff out by yourself. payoff is massive. every series i read now feels so dull after malazan
 

bomp

Pigeon
I finished Tarzan of the Apes and Return of Tarzan the other day.

I didn't realize Egdar Rice Burroughs was going to rope me into reading a sequel when I started Tarzan, but in retrospect it was worth it. The way Tarzan belittled and awed the civilized characters with his Chadly existence was invigorating, but at no point did I ever feel like I was reading anything but hypermasculine escapism. There are no savages in reality that share Tarzan's ethical savagery. Even in the tale, Tarzan is the only ethical savage and the contrast is highlighted by confrontations with regular savage savages. But I think that's what makes the tale so gripping, seeing how the author can assert civilized Western virtues through a savage medium like Tarzan. You get the freedom of the savage and the moral constraint of a civilized man, so you aren't repulsed by any of his actions. I actually can't recall a single moment throughout the entire story where I disliked Tarzan as a character. Tarzan is the noble savage that Rousseau probably wished existed. And it's not just a "lost in the wilderness" story, it's a "start in the wilderness, get lost in civilization, and want to return to the wilderness" story. ERB's unadorned prose let me zoom through the story, which zoom I did, because even though the plot was predictable, I still wanted to know the details of Tarzan's fictional alpha exploits.

The main plot point, Tarzan's oneitis for Jane was probably my biggest gripe, simply because I couldn't suspend my disbelief that a man raised by apes would act in such a stereotypically beta fashion by relinquishing his primitive life and attempting to conform to civilization, and rejecting other women, without being conditioned by any moral teachings. It just doesn't mesh with all the points of the physical alpha archetype that he embodies. With some of the dialogue between Tarzan and Jane, I found myself thinking that even with his alpha physique and heroism, there's no way a woman would not be at least somewhat repulsed by such willing subservience. But still, I won't say I didn't prefer the monogamous Tarzan, just that ERB could've written Tarzan as more dignified in his interactions with women.

Tarzan isn't high brow literature by any means and you aren't going to walk away edified, but it was great break from our degenerate feminized clown world. Indeed, this book would likely trigger most modern readers, as Tarzan
literally becomes king of the [email protected]
at one point.

When I got to this part:
redpilled_tarzan.JPG
I realized why my library doesn't carry any of Edgar Rice Burrough's books despite him creating such an iconic figure as Tarzan. I would download a digital copy or buy a cheap one off ebay because I would assume these books are disappearing from libraries by the year.
 
Last edited:

Grow Bag

Sparrow
Embers -- Sandor Marai. Published in 1942 it's a beautifully written book essentially about the consequences of betrayal in a Europe where commitment, honor, tradition, hierarchy still had stock but were gradually being eroded. The story follows the lives of 2 boys, both training to be army officers, who form a bond of friendship. They are both from aristocratic families, one still thriving and the other that had fallen on hard times. Oh, just read it.
 

Castelnau

Woodpecker
The Revenge of Geography by Robert Kaplan. Cannot recommend this book enough.

Here are the parts I highlighted.

The only thing enduring is a people’s position on the map. Thus, in times of upheaval maps rise in importance. With the political ground shifting rapidly under one’s feet, the map, though not determinitive, is the beginning of discerning a historical logic about what might come next.

The DMZ, like the Berlin Wall, is an arbitrary border of no geographical logic that divides an ethnic nation at the spot where two opposing armies happened to come to rest. Just as Germany was reunited, we might expect, or at least should plan for, a united Greater Korea. Again, the forces of culture and geography are likely to prevail at some point. A man-made border that does not match a natural frontier zone is particularly vulnerable.

simply because a nation is a democracy does not mean that its foreign policy will necessarily turn out to be better or more enlightened than that of a dictatorship.

It is no accident that the world’s poorest regions tend to be where geography, by way of soil suitability, supports high population densities, but not economic growth—because of distance from ports and railheads. Central India and inland Africa are prime examples of this.

Kaplan, Robert D.. The Revenge of Geography: What the Map Tells Us About Coming Conflicts and the Battle Against Fate . Random House Publishing Group. Kindle Edition.
 

RonaldB

Newbie
I just finished reading "Dune" by Frank Herbert. I was very impressed with the mystical and spiritual elements of the book. Everything fit almost perfectly: the politics, the spirituality, a vision of the future where mankind is not depended on machines which is something that science fiction relies to much on. I also finished like a month ago, "Spiritual Warfare and the Discernment of Spirits" by Dan Burke. This last book made me buy "Discernment of Spirits" by Fr. Timothy Gallagher which the Burke's book references a lot.
 

Louis IX

Pelican
I have just finished

What Never Happened: by Boris SAVINKOV.

A few years I read from him "The Pale Horse". A great novel , tainted by the duality between murder and morals , traditions and anarchy, faith or chaos , and heroism vs fatalism.
A great underrated writer.
 

Grow Bag

Sparrow
Finished Independent people by Halldor Laxness last night. It took some time to get fully engaged, but it gradually cast it's spell and I thoroughly enjoyed it. There are some similarities with Knut Hamsun's Growth of the Soil, in that both explore the travails of strong willed, stoical Nordic peasant men coming to terms with modernity.
 

MRAll134

Kingfisher
I just finished Tim Keller's The Prodigal God. It is a seven chapter book on the parable of the prodigal son, in which a younger brother is welcoming back by his father (a metaphor for God), but not by his older brother - who is too self-righteous. The book looks at how each brother does not approach the Father in a loving way, but in a materialistic one (they both want their Father's money, lands). It is a pretty light read, if you are looking for something Christian, but not preachy.
 
I finished Tarzan of the Apes and Return of Tarzan the other day.

I didn't realize Egdar Rice Burroughs was going to rope me into reading a sequel when I started Tarzan, but in retrospect it was worth it. The way Tarzan belittled and awed the civilized characters with his Chadly existence was invigorating, but at no point did I ever feel like I was reading anything but hypermasculine escapism. There are no savages in reality that share Tarzan's ethical savagery. Even in the tale, Tarzan is the only ethical savage and the contrast is highlighted by confrontations with regular savage savages. But I think that's what makes the tale so gripping, seeing how the author can assert civilized Western virtues through a savage medium like Tarzan. You get the freedom of the savage and the moral constraint of a civilized man, so you aren't repulsed by any of his actions. I actually can't recall a single moment throughout the entire story where I disliked Tarzan as a character. Tarzan is the noble savage that Rousseau probably wished existed. And it's not just a "lost in the wilderness" story, it's a "start in the wilderness, get lost in civilization, and want to return to the wilderness" story. ERB's unadorned prose let me zoom through the story, which zoom I did, because even though the plot was predictable, I still wanted to know the details of Tarzan's fictional alpha exploits.

The main plot point, Tarzan's oneitis for Jane was probably my biggest gripe, simply because I couldn't suspend my disbelief that a man raised by apes would act in such a stereotypically beta fashion by relinquishing his primitive life and attempting to conform to civilization, and rejecting other women, without being conditioned by any moral teachings. It just doesn't mesh with all the points of the physical alpha archetype that he embodies. With some of the dialogue between Tarzan and Jane, I found myself thinking that even with his alpha physique and heroism, there's no way a woman would not be at least somewhat repulsed by such willing subservience. But still, I won't say I didn't prefer the monogamous Tarzan, just that ERB could've written Tarzan as more dignified in his interactions with women.

Tarzan isn't high brow literature by any means and you aren't going to walk away edified, but it was great break from our degenerate feminized clown world. Indeed, this book would likely trigger most modern readers, as Tarzan
literally becomes king of the [email protected]
at one point.

When I got to this part:
View attachment 25801
I realized why my library doesn't carry any of Edgar Rice Burrough's books despite him creating such an iconic figure as Tarzan. I would download a digital copy or buy a cheap one off ebay because I would assume these books are disappearing from libraries by the year.

I am a huge ERB's fan, but through his John Carter of Mars series. When I was a kid, I wanted to grow up and marry Dejah Thoris! Lol

I did read the Philip Jose Farmer tribute novel to Tarzan, which gives a fresh new take on the character, by presenting him as a real person...


But "Tarzan, Alive," was just one of several pieces Farmer wrote using Tarzan...


And he even wrote a Doc Savage novel!

 

TheMaleBrain

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Here is a great, and I do mean GREAT book:
The Dictator's Handbook


Imagine if all the pieces of understanding politics suddenly fell into the right place. If you actually understand why power works the way it does, and finally can understand all sorts of phenomena.

It's easy to understand, uses multiple examples from modern (as well as ancient) time and can be read all at once or over several periods of time (as I did).
I have the PDF version, so if anyone is interested, drop me a PM.
 

open source

Sparrow
Gold Member


The Way of the Fight - GSP

It's a bit of biography mixed with his mindsets, setting goals, training.

I like GSP. The 2 lessons I learned regarding his training would be his work ethic and coach-ability as an athlete. He works hard, trains a lot and listens - a coach's dream athlete.

Life lessons too. Hard work without complaining, persistence, to value family over stuff - he gave his UFC belts to his mom, coaches. And to keep staying humble even after fame and fortune.

"Georges St-Pierre was the single greatest example of a positive athletic role model I ever met in my career. Every dojo or training partner he walked into or befriended was lifted by his appearance. " - Danaher, bjj instructor

He was bullied as a kid. His dad made him take karate at 7. He talked about how it was about a 100 white belt kids at the beginning and he lost to most of them. Then the number of students slowly dwindled yet he started winning more fights. When he received his black belt before 13 there were only 2 standing.

GSP came from a modest background. He was working as a garbageman and trained on the side. He put his small earnings into his fight career. He would take the bus from Montreal to NYC on weekends to train jiujitsu.

He gets scared and nervous before fights, having trouble sleeping before fights, except before he fought Matt Serra the first time haha.

GSP is a true martial artist. He still trains everyday even after retirement. He has been a model professional for MMA and played a key part in getting it to the public and making it grow to become the most popular combat sport int he world.
 

Louis IX

Pelican
I have just finished "Secret War in Central Africa" from Canadian-born author Patrick Mbeko , of Congolese origin.
The book was only published in French , but is very well-written and informative.
1604231743967.png
It explains how Paul Kagame , the president of Rwanda, has prepared the murders of several presidents ( Juvenal Habyarimana (Rwanda) , Cyprien Ntaryamira (Burundi ) , Mobutu survived it ) and contributed to the looting and full genocide with the help of the Israelis , the US ( Clinton administration) and the dark role of Canada , in a war which cost the life of around 500k/1 million people.
The book also explores the dirty connection of the Kagame empire through Yoweri Museveni and the role of Uganda in the logistics and the absolute genocide. And how France was back-stabbed by their "allies" USA and Canada .

The end-goal being to steal all resources of the Kivu province in the Democratic Republic of Congo - mostly Coltan reserves.

I bought the book some years ago , without knowing much about Rwanda , but turned out to be a very interesting book.

Until today , these two presidents are still in position and they are basically selling DR Congo's soil to the big corporations.
 

JiggyLordJr

Kingfisher
“Polar Vortex” by Matthew Mather

A first-hand look into how a father reacts when in the Arctic cold with his daughter. Survival novel, would absolutely recommend.

 

TheMaleBrain

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Have you ever read a book that felt like you were hearing music?
Here is a novel, not a long one, which focuses on miscommunications. That's right, a novel, in which the characters don't communicate well. When you read it it will feel like you are reading/listening to music.


Seta (silk) by Alessandro Baricco.
 
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