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TheMaleBrain

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Fate of Empires by Glubb Pasha or John Glubb. Interesting Brit who served the Jordan legion and describes the tendencies of societies in decline. One particularly interesting thing I found was the presence of singers in the Muslim world, which annoyed the Caliph of Baghdad. However, every season the singers would return.

"The heroes of declining nations are always the same—the athlete, the singer or the actor. The word ‘celebrity’ today is used to designate a comedian or a football player, not a statesman, a general, or a literary genius."

Highly recommend it as well.
I use him as one of my go-to stories. You can tell it as a captivating story on the cyclical nature of history.
 

TheMaleBrain

Kingfisher
Gold Member
A_Talent_For_War1.JPG


A Sci-Fi "archeology thriller". It is the story of a search by Alex, the protagonist, to discover the nature of a mysterious project Alex's uncle had been working on at the time of his death. This investigation leads deep into the history of a war between human civilization and a neighboring alien civilization and challenges the foundation mythos of the current human government. And did I mention it happens a few millennia into the future?
Also, forum members will be happy to learn that Christianity survives 10K years into the future.
 

RonaldB

Sparrow
I've had many self-described Christians tell me that they liked the Buddhist teachings and that they were compatible with Christianity. I could never get into it.

Buddhism is very passive: you're powerless to do anything about the world so the sooner you accept it the sooner you'll have peace and, as you mentioned, that the world is an illusion so there is nothing of true or eternal consequence. Whereas following Christ empowers us to shape the world in His image, even though this current world is already fallen. To follow Christ is the farthest thing from passivity as I could imagine, it entails with it spiritual warfare that we wrestle with more and more everyday but we can have peace in Christ knowing that He gave us the victory.

Anyways, I don't wish to derail the thread.
On the surface, Buddhism has some wisdom, but on a larger scale, it fails to give an accurate description of the world. Christianity has the answers through Christ. If you read some of the early Buddhist discourses, the Buddha doesn't really answer the questions of his followers. He just points them to find the truths for themselves (Through meditation, living a virtuous life, etc) But since we know that we're fallen and sinners, whatever knowledge or wisdom we find outside of Christ will be tainted with lies from our fallen nature and the demons who are constantly trying to get us away from God.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
On the surface, Buddhism has some wisdom, but on a larger scale, it fails to give an accurate description of the world. Christianity has the answers through Christ. If you read some of the early Buddhist discourses, the Buddha doesn't really answer the questions of his followers. He just points them to find the truths for themselves (Through meditation, living a virtuous life, etc) But since we know that we're fallen and sinners, whatever knowledge or wisdom we find outside of Christ will be tainted with lies from our fallen nature and the demons who are constantly trying to get us away from God.
Goes all the way back to Adam and Eve. The devil calls us to "enlightenment" and self exaltation. Every religion of the world follows this. But God calls us to Christ, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.
 

Days of Broken Arrows

Crow
Gold Member
Hillbilly Elegy

J. D. Vance

Vance is a 30-something graduate of Yale Law School, by unlikely way of: Kentucky Mountain family, Hillbilly Ohio transplant, United States Marine Corps, and Ohio State University.

Vance describes his chaotic youth and dysfunctional family with great humor, love, and candor. Raised by an addict mother and the saving grace of his also troubled hillbilly grandparents, Vance still had the pride of poor Mountain people (Grandma, why does everyone stop and get out when the funeral drives by? Because, Honey, we are Mountain people, and we respect our dead) and love of America (Goddamit, JD, don't be like those fucking losers who think the deck is always stacked against them).

After stumbling through school, Vance earned the title Marine. After combat tour and responsibility above pay grade, he discharged honorably and went to college at OSU (graduating in less than 3 years) and eventually to Yale Law school.

The book is a fast read. Many Red Pill truths dropped along the way. I wonder how I would have performed under the disaster of this man's youth.

After reading Vance's book, there is little surprise why this part of the country flipped parties and voted Trump. Indeed, Vance's folk (often old Blue Dog Democrats) are Hillary's Deplorables. And they feel it. May Trump do them right.

I suspect this book is a prelude to a political career.

Highly recommend.

Three years later, I finally got around to reading "Hillbilly Elegy" and agree with Ranch Hand's assessment of it. I'd also recommend it.

The author J.D. Vance and the book (and the movie) are being mis-characterized by the media. No surprise there. This is not a political tract, but a story of one guy's struggle out of a bad place.

Let me put it another way -- a way you won't find in the media. He's a hillbilly from the sticks. I'm an Italian from the bad section of Brooklyn. Although the details of our lives could not be more different, I saw a lot of similar family struggles between us. That gave me a window into his life and his culture.

I think the media can't get a grasp on this book or this author because most of them are from very rich families and have never had to deal with abusive parents, drug addicted relatives, or financial hardships. But the other 99 percent of us probably share some fragment of Vance's story and will be able to relate to this book.
 

MikeV12

Sparrow
Hard times create strong men by Stefan Aarnio.
Excellent take on what it takes to be a man. I was first reading this when he died so I was shocked. But I go back to it and I like the audible narration.
Highly recommend
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
Orthodox
The Federal Reserve Conspiracy by Antony C. Sutton

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Technically not a conspiracy since it actually happened. Provides a very accurate historical account, referencing the autobiographies of several presidents during the 1800s - 1900s. A short, but fascinating read. Would recommend to any American; it’s absolutely critical knowledge as to who truly owns this country.
 

Vienna

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Endurance by Alfred Lansing. Details the extraordinary true story of Ernest Shackleton’s 1915 Polar expedition. Take-away message: Man’s strength and resilience grows according the adversity he faces.

The 1300 km open-boat journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia, through the most infernal weather conditions on Earth, is ranked as one of the greatest sea voyages ever undertaken. Can’t recommend this book enough.
 

yarqur

Sparrow
The Federal Reserve Conspiracy by Antony C. Sutton

s-l1000.jpg


Technically not a conspiracy since it actually happened. Provides a very accurate historical account, referencing the autobiographies of several presidents during the 1800s - 1900s. A short, but fascinating read. Would recommend to any American; it’s absolutely critical knowledge as to who truly owns this country.
Sorry to chip in like this, but maybe you have mistaken the meaning of the word conspiracy or some sort of typo.

Conspiracies do actually happen. They only try to brainwash the public to automatically link the word conspiracy to something unreal. In the Bible it's told they conspired against Jesus and Paul for example. Satan conspires against the whole world.

Haven't read the book, but am aware of probably most of the content. Seems like an interesting book indeed.
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
Orthodox
Sorry to chip in like this, but maybe you have mistaken the meaning of the word conspiracy or some sort of typo.

Conspiracies do actually happen. They only try to brainwash the public to automatically link the word conspiracy to something unreal. In the Bible it's told they conspired against Jesus and Paul for example. Satan conspires against the whole world.

Haven't read the book, but am aware of probably most of the content. Seems like an interesting book indeed.
Yeah, it’s a shame that the word has been warped in meaning by the MSM. Strongly recommend you read it, it’s a good refresher of US history as well.
 

typtre

Woodpecker
Bachelor Pad Economics by Aaron Clarey.
Was a good book, though I was not the target audience (American 20-something), and I was already familiar with a lot of things mentioned. A lot of things regarding American systems, like tax laws etc, I skipped.

Prior to that I read The Curse of the High IQ, also by Aaron Clarey. A very good book for the wise but lost/confused minds out there. Though from a Christian perspective, I would say he is a bit of a worldly man. Tread carefully.
 

Grow Bag

Kingfisher
Hans Fallada -- Wolf Among Wolves
The story is essentially about the maturation of Wolfgang Pagel, a demobilized young lieutenant, during the Weimar period. Fallada does a splendid job of depicting the people of a defeated, demoralized nation struggling to keep their heads above water at a time of hyper-inflation. Crime is rampant and every vice is indulged in this daily struggle for survival. A thoroughly enjoyable read, with a rich cast of characters.
 

Grow Bag

Kingfisher
Just finished Hans Fallada's Every Man Dies Alone. A fictionalised acount of a true story of a husband and wife team who drop anti-nazi postcards around Berlin, this is Fallada's most high rated book. I didn't enjoy it as much as The Drinker or Wolf Among Wolves, but it plays to the animus the literary world has to all things Nazi, so I understand why it's so highly rated.
 

lutak

Pigeon
The last book I've finished reading was "a day in the life of ivan denisovich" then I read about half of "cancer ward" before starting "gulag archipelago" and i haven't finished a book since, came close with the book "how to die" by Seneca. Listened to the audiobook " the turner diaries" and "Orthodoxy and the religion of the future" "Cancer ward" may be extremely relevant to the spirit of the times and probably worth a re read at this point. I start a great deal more books then I seem to finish. I recently started reading "the brothers karazmonov"
 
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