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Kingfisher
Little Man, What Now? -- Hans Fallada.
This is the least enjoyable book I've read by Fallada. It's the story of young married couple struggling to get by in a Germany of mass unemployment and political turmoil. What's interesting about Fallada's fiction is that he tends to be quite autobiographical, using his own experiences and other people in his circle, to weave his stories set in Weimar and Hitler's Germany. He was no political idealist, rather he was anti-authoritarian and liberal in his political leaning. He represents the artistic, "lovey" class so often targeted for censure by the National Socialists.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
Trickle Up Poverty: Stopping Obama's Attack on our Borders, Economy, and Security by Michael Savage.

3 outta 5. Takes me back 10 years which were simpler in many ways but the more things change the more they stay the same. Politics is a losing man's game.
 

Cervantes

Woodpecker
I just finished "Lord of the World" by Robert Hugh Benson.


It is a dystopian novel about the coming of the anti-Christ. Benson was the son of the then Archbishop of Canterbury and was ordained an Anglican cleric. Shortly afterward he converted to Catholicism and became a Catholic priest, a massive shock to the Episcopal world. Later he became a close assistant to Pope Saint Pius X (the best Pope in modern history).

The book starts off slow. This is one of those books where there are frequent digressions explaining some point of philosophy from the point of view of Christianity or materialism. The digression bogs the book down a bit at the start - but the story picks up the pace by the middle and is quite exciting once things really get going.

Written in 1907, and set in 2007. I'm sure it seemed a pretty weird and extreme vision of the future well into the middle of the 20th century. But it predicts a lot of our current social situation pretty well. Benson's world is not nearly so morally depraved as our modern world.

Strongly recommended, especially for the expositions comparing materialism and Christianity and accurately predicting the results of unchecked materialism.
 

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Woodpecker
Inside the Passion: An Insiders Look at the Passion of the Christ by John Bartunek.

This book is both an analysis and a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Mel Gibson film, of which I adore. The film leaned catholic and this book is decidedly even more catholic being written by a Catholic Priest so when it delves into the theology you may find things you agree or disagree with. There were a few glaring errors that slipped past the editing process but those were few and far between. If you enjoyed the film, you will enjoy this book but I also recommend watching the deleted scenes and all the directors commentary if you own the film.
 

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Kingfisher
The German Lesson by Siegfried Lenz
WW2 has ended and Siggi Jepson is in a juvenile detention centre where he is tasked with writing something on "the joys of duty". Siggi struggles to put pen to paper initially, but soon finds he has a lot to say about the topic. What starts as an exercise turns into an obsession to exorcise the memories of his troubled childhood as the child of policeman who took his duties all too seriously in his pursuit of a local artist who has been blacklisted by the Nazi regime.
It's a very well written study in authoritarianism vs individualism in wartime Germany.
 

Gazeebo

Pigeon
Finished volume 1 of 4 of Outlaws of the Marsh by Shi Nai'an and Luo Guanzhong. Its fictional tales from around the twelfth-century during the Song Dynasty. Some tall tales and some brotherhoods being made along the way of some betrayal and a lot of wine drinking with a trickle of duels and head smashing. Oh and the word kowtowing is used a lot too. And it shows how easily the all might dollar (strings of cash) can persuade almost anyone to doing anything.

Did I mention that a guy (Sagacious Lu) ripped a willow tree out of the ground with his bare hands?

4 out of 5 so far. Will update after volume 2-4
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
Just finished "Napoleon: A Life" by Andrew Roberts. I've read hundreds of military history books and this is one of the best. It is a breezy, enjoyable, even funny treatise on Napoleon's life. It explains well why he was able to succeed and why he ultimately failed. In fact, the lessons of Napoleon's life are probably worth a separate post. Highly recommended book.
 

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Kingfisher
Last night I finished Secondhand Time: The Last of the Soviets by Svetlana Alexievich. In this book Alexievich interviews a number citizens of the former Soviet Union. For those interested in escaping to East Europe I recommend reading this book before you make any decision.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
In one sitting, I read Theopoetica: Poems and Essays by our very own Michael Witcoff. 5 outta 5.

Michael, I'm very impressed with your book. In particular, "Freedom's Heavy Yoke" resonated with me, perhaps more than I care to admit. I must actively pray and ask God to help me discipline my wandering free will and ambitions. I also enjoyed "He is the One" so much that I felt inspired to put it to song as I have been practicing my harmonica again and could use the exercise. I like "Posterity" as I am unsure if God will call me to marriage and child-bearing but even so I have fathered some in the faith.

Poetry is not my native language so some poems, such as the one about the coyote, did not speak to me as much as others but we all gotta flex our chops somehow.

Your essay on the degradation of art in the western tradition also rang true and I hope that this work will inspire others to create classical art that edifies God and inspires people to do good. Not like the crap that sells today.

I don't know about you guys but I've had enough of all the rap music, superhero movies, and sex books I can handle.
 
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In one sitting, I read Theopoetica: Poems and Essays by our very own Michael Witcoff. 5 outta 5.

Michael, I'm very impressed with your book. In particular, "Freedom's Heavy Yoke" resonated with me, perhaps more than I care to admit. I must actively pray and ask God to help me discipline my wandering free will and ambitions. I also enjoyed "He is the One" so much that I felt inspired to put it to song as I have been practicing my harmonica again and could use the exercise. I like "Posterity" as I am unsure if God will call me to marriage and child-bearing but even so I have fathered some in the faith.

Poetry is not my native language so some poems, such as the one about the coyote, did not speak to me as much as others but we all gotta flex our chops somehow.

Your essay on the degradation of art in the western tradition also rang true and I hope that this work will inspire others to create classical art that edifies God and inspires people to do good. Not like the crap that sells today.

I don't know about you guys but I've had enough of all the rap music, superhero movies, and sex books I can handle.
Thank you I really appreciate that. Glad you enjoyed the book!
 
I've just finished Codreanu's book For My Legionaries. It's full of interesting history and quotes, such as: "In reality man has no rights in a democracy. He did not lose them for the benefit of either the national collectivity or the nation, but in favor of a politico-financier caste of bankers and electoral agents."
 
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Leadership” by Rudolph “Rudy” Giuliani

“Leadership” opens with a gripping account of Giuliani's immediate reaction to the September 11 attacks – including a narrow escape from the original crisis command headquarters.

The book draws upon Giuliani's experiences as a corporate lawyer, a U.S. Attorney, and as the Mayor of New York City. Giuliani demonstrates how the leadership skills he practices can be successfully employed by any person who has to run anything. There are numerous examples throughout the book that Giuliani utilises, explaining the “how” behind his methods.

The leadership principles he champions (preparation; accountability; and a strong sense of self-determination), are evident of Giuliani's hands on management style. In addition, a willingness to respond quickly, and in person, to crises.

Giuliani's chronicling of morning meetings with senior staff is an excellent example of how to conduct successful, and meaningful meetings. They are a great tool to successfully control a large organisation through subordinates.

Throughout the book, there is no doubt the devotion to the role that Giuliani possessed. He is direct, and unfiltered – balanced by a sense of thoughtfulness, and sensitivity. His transition from registered Democrat to Republican, mirrors that of a significant segment of the population, and will become more of trend over time. He noted in the 70s how New York City was being destroyed by the preaching of entitlement. A mindset that had been established which locks people into poverty, in turn, creating a permanent underclass that would become permanent cheerleaders for the Democrats.

I personally would have preferred to read more about his involvement in the Mafia trials, and the successful prosecution. That could have been a book in itself. Apart from that, there are no major detraction from the book. I personally have taken down notes throughout, while reading the book. All up, I filled half a notebook with the insights contained in the book. The quotations could become a separate thread on its own.

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I have just finished reading "Flying High" by Tony Fernandes - Founder of AirAsia. Very positive book, and a number of examples where he overcame obstacles. I found it very uplifting, and helps avoid any feelings of despondency.

Currently getting around to reading Richard Branson's Autobiography - There is a good amount of humour in it so far. I had a good laugh at times!
 
Going through Devil's Guard by George Robert Elford right now. Nobody knows how much of the book is true or not. I've read it's a rare inside peek on how soldiers operate.

In the past month I've gone through:
Making the Best of Basics by James Talmage Stevens
[military book]
[military book]
[military book]
The Slight Edge by Jeff Olson
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
Everything is F*cked by Mark Manson
Tribe of Mentors by Tim Ferriss
The Book of Five Rings
Winning through Intimidation
 
Just read "Fast This Way" by Dave Asprey. Good book about fasting -- containing both scientific studies AND experiential / philosophical points of the benefits of fasting. I've been very into intermittent fasting but after this book I want to kick it up to the next level and try doing OMAD (one meal a day) once in a while, and maybe even try a 3-4 day fast when I have no obligations for that amount of time.
 

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Woodpecker
Finished Art of War by Sun Tzu.
Not much I can say about this that hasn't already been said.
Also finished On the Masons and Their Lies by our brother in Christ Michael Witcoff.
For those of you who do not understand the dangers of Freemasonry or know someone who does not, I recommend this book. I also enjoyed the additional insight into the Orthodox perspective. Looking forward to whatever you have coming next Michael, try not keep us waiting.
 

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Kingfisher
Memoirs of an Anti-Semite -- Gregor von Rezzori
Not exactly what it seems from the title. Rezzori, who is from an aristocratic lineage, recounts his relationship with Jews at various periods in his life. Rezzori lived through the period when European aristocracy was dying, along with the values his forebears held, such as honour, fidelity, generosity, decorum, etc. He recounts various periods in his life where, either through friendship, and even marriage, to Jews, he struggled with his ambivalence towards them, being both repelled and attracted. He considers the JQ with a degree of realism and humaneness, borne out of constant proximity, that I've not encountered before. This is my second book by Rezzori and I have to say he's a quirky and talented author. The book was funny, whimsical and moving. 4/5.
 
Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl. Published 1946
One of the best book I ever read. Austrian psychiatrist describing his experience from Auschwitz as a prisoner, what impact on the human mind it has, and how to find meaning in life despite earth's dark valleys.

The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit
True story about a man who lived alone 27 years alone in the woods in Maine.
Probably not a widely known book but I liked it. Must read for everyone who sometimes dreams about living alone in nature as I do.
 
Where Have You Gone MichaelAngelo? - Thomas Day
Takes a nuanced view on Vatican Two, American WASP Culture VS Catholic Culture, and the changing Art in the Catholic Church. Must read if anyone wants to learn about the change in Liturgical Worship within the Catholic Church.
 
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