Whenever you finish a book, post it here

prendergast

Sparrow
Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl. Published 1946
One of the best book I ever read. Austrian psychiatrist describing his experience from Auschwitz as a prisoner, what impact on the human mind it has, and how to find meaning in life despite earth's dark valleys.

The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit
True story about a man who lived alone 27 years alone in the woods in Maine.
Probably not a widely known book but I liked it. Must read for everyone who sometimes dreams about living alone in nature as I do.
I actually read The Stranger in the Woods last year! It took me an afternoon to read because it's pretty short but it's still enjoyable. I like to imagine myself being able to go twenty-seven years speaking not a word to anybody but I'd probably go crazy after about a year... If you look at pictures of Chris Knight he looks like he is high on the autism spectrum (physiognomy doesn't lie) so this could be the reason why he was able to do what he did. And his case in particular is interesting because he didn't exactly shun technology/modern living like Christopher McCandless (from Into the Wild) did. If I remember correctly, Knight somehow had a television up and running in his den and regularly ate junk food. So he was basically the ultimate NEET. It's kind of sad though that he was forced to reenter society.
 

paulag

Chicken
Strangers to the City by Michael Casey

It's about Trappist Monks and Trappist spirituality and how to incorporate some of their spiritual practices into your own life. It seriously changed the way I approach many aspects of my life and how I look at life in general. It calmed down a lot of my anxieties about life and helped me get past the idea I had that I needed to have a "perfect" life. It helped me find more balance and accept myself more.
I plan on doing a re-read of it soon.
 

fortyfive

Pigeon
I actually read The Stranger in the Woods last year! It took me an afternoon to read because it's pretty short but it's still enjoyable. I like to imagine myself being able to go twenty-seven years speaking not a word to anybody but I'd probably go crazy after about a year... If you look at pictures of Chris Knight he looks like he is high on the autism spectrum (physiognomy doesn't lie) so this could be the reason why he was able to do what he did. And his case in particular is interesting because he didn't exactly shun technology/modern living like Christopher McCandless (from Into the Wild) did. If I remember correctly, Knight somehow had a television up and running in his den and regularly ate junk food. So he was basically the ultimate NEET. It's kind of sad though that he was forced to reenter society.
Do you know there are many strangers in the woods here in East EU? In fact, I know about many hidden settlements (Chris Knight style) here where people permanently live. Mainly in the forest and brush around railroads, or abandoned places outside the city.
These people are mostly gypsy or homeless and they do not live exactly the same solitary lives as a Knight but their lifestyle looks similar.
When I walk with my dog through a former military exercise area or along railroads I often see these strangers. They don't behave like city drinkers or beggars but they are much shyer and avoiding others.
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
I just finished "Unmasked: Inside Antifa's Radical Plan to Destroy Democracy" by Andy Ngo. It's an introductory-level book on the history and activities of Antifa in the US, focusing on their activities over the past four years or so. It has some useful information, such as the names of some of the MSM "journalists" who are dishonestly white-washing Antifa's activities.

One of the most effective parts of the book is where he describes his parents' escape from persecution in Communist Vietnam. Of course, he points out the irony of his parents fleeing from communism, only for their son to get bashed by communists in the street of the very city in the US they escaped to.
 
I've been reading a lot of non fiction as of late and can't get into detail about the contents. I finished Brave New World and am currently on Snow Crash. I like BNW more than Snow Crash. Snow Crash is such a strange book while Brave New World is kind of relatable even though it was written nearly 100 years ago.
 

C-Note

Ostrich
Gold Member
I've been reading a lot of non fiction as of late and can't get into detail about the contents. I finished Brave New World and am currently on Snow Crash. I like BNW more than Snow Crash. Snow Crash is such a strange book while Brave New World is kind of relatable even though it was written nearly 100 years ago.
I read Snow Crash but I don't remember anything about it. I suggest reading Neal Stephenson's three book series "The Baroque Cycle." I also really liked his book Cyrptonomicon.
 
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