Whenever you finish a book, post it here

Man's Search for Meaning - Viktor Frankl. Published 1946
One of the best book I ever read. Austrian psychiatrist describing his experience from Auschwitz as a prisoner, what impact on the human mind it has, and how to find meaning in life despite earth's dark valleys.

The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit
True story about a man who lived alone 27 years alone in the woods in Maine.
Probably not a widely known book but I liked it. Must read for everyone who sometimes dreams about living alone in nature as I do.
I actually read The Stranger in the Woods last year! It took me an afternoon to read because it's pretty short but it's still enjoyable. I like to imagine myself being able to go twenty-seven years speaking not a word to anybody but I'd probably go crazy after about a year... If you look at pictures of Chris Knight he looks like he is high on the autism spectrum (physiognomy doesn't lie) so this could be the reason why he was able to do what he did. And his case in particular is interesting because he didn't exactly shun technology/modern living like Christopher McCandless (from Into the Wild) did. If I remember correctly, Knight somehow had a television up and running in his den and regularly ate junk food. So he was basically the ultimate NEET. It's kind of sad though that he was forced to reenter society.
 

paulag

Chicken
Strangers to the City by Michael Casey

It's about Trappist Monks and Trappist spirituality and how to incorporate some of their spiritual practices into your own life. It seriously changed the way I approach many aspects of my life and how I look at life in general. It calmed down a lot of my anxieties about life and helped me get past the idea I had that I needed to have a "perfect" life. It helped me find more balance and accept myself more.
I plan on doing a re-read of it soon.
 

fortyfive

Woodpecker
I actually read The Stranger in the Woods last year! It took me an afternoon to read because it's pretty short but it's still enjoyable. I like to imagine myself being able to go twenty-seven years speaking not a word to anybody but I'd probably go crazy after about a year... If you look at pictures of Chris Knight he looks like he is high on the autism spectrum (physiognomy doesn't lie) so this could be the reason why he was able to do what he did. And his case in particular is interesting because he didn't exactly shun technology/modern living like Christopher McCandless (from Into the Wild) did. If I remember correctly, Knight somehow had a television up and running in his den and regularly ate junk food. So he was basically the ultimate NEET. It's kind of sad though that he was forced to reenter society.
Do you know there are many strangers in the woods here in East EU? In fact, I know about many hidden settlements (Chris Knight style) here where people permanently live. Mainly in the forest and brush around railroads, or abandoned places outside the city.
These people are mostly gypsy or homeless and they do not live exactly the same solitary lives as a Knight but their lifestyle looks similar.
When I walk with my dog through a former military exercise area or along railroads I often see these strangers. They don't behave like city drinkers or beggars but they are much shyer and avoiding others.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I just finished "Unmasked: Inside Antifa's Radical Plan to Destroy Democracy" by Andy Ngo. It's an introductory-level book on the history and activities of Antifa in the US, focusing on their activities over the past four years or so. It has some useful information, such as the names of some of the MSM "journalists" who are dishonestly white-washing Antifa's activities.

One of the most effective parts of the book is where he describes his parents' escape from persecution in Communist Vietnam. Of course, he points out the irony of his parents fleeing from communism, only for their son to get bashed by communists in the street of the very city in the US they escaped to.
 
I've been reading a lot of non fiction as of late and can't get into detail about the contents. I finished Brave New World and am currently on Snow Crash. I like BNW more than Snow Crash. Snow Crash is such a strange book while Brave New World is kind of relatable even though it was written nearly 100 years ago.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I've been reading a lot of non fiction as of late and can't get into detail about the contents. I finished Brave New World and am currently on Snow Crash. I like BNW more than Snow Crash. Snow Crash is such a strange book while Brave New World is kind of relatable even though it was written nearly 100 years ago.
I read Snow Crash but I don't remember anything about it. I suggest reading Neal Stephenson's three book series "The Baroque Cycle." I also really liked his book Cyrptonomicon.
 

BasedStefan

Pigeon
Orthodox
I just finished 'Imperium' by Yockey (hardcover 900 page version). It was good, Yockey not only influenced politics in America by writing for Fr Coughlin's 'Social Justice' he influenced Mussolini and started his own European Party in England because he had disagreements with Mosley. Yockey would be arrested several times, have several pseudonyms on his passport's and injure a FBI Officer, Yockey would die in jail by swallowing a cyanid pill. Highly recommend if you are interested in 3rd position philosophy and understanding America's and Europe's modern struggle.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
The Dunwich Horror by H.P Lovecraft.

I've been reading his stories here and there from a complete collection and I found this one a little weak though some of them are pretty good. They start to get samey.
 

MichaelWitcoff

Hummingbird
Orthodox
I’m probably not going to finish Rollo Tomassi’s new book “The Rational Male: Religion.” I thought it would be interesting to read and review, hoping it would be a nice combination of my previous and current world views, but I found it poorly-organized and critiquing a version of Christianity that I don’t subscribe to and doesn’t represent Orthodoxy at all.
 

Diocletian

Woodpecker
"The Myth of the Andalusian Paradise"
Darío Fernández-Morera

Very well researched book which pulls apart the common myth that Islamic-ruled Spain was some kind of multicultural paradise. He shows how the Islamic rulers were little more than primitives who came into Spain and were completely astonished by the superior Christian Visigothic culture, and how they were really ruthless dictators who murdered, tortured, and oppressed their Christian subjects.

"The Last Superstition"
Edward Feser

This is a response to the "Four Horseman of the New Atheism," especially Dawkins. Feser is a Catholic Thomist philosopher and shows how completely irrational atheism is through his knowledge of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas. The put down of Dawkins is pretty noteworthy in that he shows how Dawkins doesn't actually understand the arguments he is supposedly refuting. Read this before tackling "Logos Rising" because he does a much better job of explaining Aristotle than EMJ does. The dad humor can get a little tedious at times though.
 

Cervantes

Woodpecker
Woman
Just finished rereading Machiavelli's The Prince.

This is a short but culturally very important book that all men should read.

Machiavelli was a 16th century diplomat from Florence, which is in the period of the warring Italian city states. This is the time in history when Spain was ascendant. Ferdinand and Isabella had just finished reconquering Hispania and Columbus was on his voyages to the "Indies". Italy was disorganized and at the mercy of all the world's great powers (Spain, France and 'the Empire' aka. the Germans).

Machiavelli, despite being a very skilled civil servant, had been forceably retired from public life in semi exile on his farm within sight of the city of Florence.

Written in 1514, The Prince is a practical manual for ruling a kingdom that he wrote in an effort to get rehired as an advisor to an ascendant young nobleman. It didn't work - and he never again worked in politics, but his manual slowly gained a reputation around the nobles of Europe both as being an immoral work on statecraft that excused evil, but also as clear-eyed realistic advice on what it takes to rule.

The book is short, and even today is extremely readable and surprisingly modern. It is a fun read. Machiavelli gets right to the point on what a prince must and must not do and why.

Typical Machiavelli advice:

Bad things (like killing enemies) should be done all at once and not often repeated. Good things done periodically and in new and unexpected ways.

You will make worse enemies confiscating property than killing enemies. A man will sooner forgive that you killed his father than that you stole his patrimony.

Is it better to be loved or feared? Both, if you can manage it. But if you cannot be both, then it is much better to be feared. Love moves your allies to help you in good times, but only fear motivates them to help you in hard times. The worst is to be hated (from too much raping and pillaging) or not respected (from cowardive, indecisiveness or the worst: effeminacy). In both cases you will soon lose your kingdom.

After each piece of direct advice like this there is a short explanation of the dynamics involved, and then some practical examples from history - that cut right to the point - for the busy monarch who doesn't have time for florid (and effeminate) language.

Some of it is quite based: "Fortune is a woman. If she is to be submissive it is necessary to beat and coerce her."

A smart person can read it in a few evenings.
 

Monty_Brogan

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Just finished rereading Machiavelli's The Prince.

This is a short but culturally very important book that all men should read.

Machiavelli was a 16th century diplomat from Florence, which is in the period of the warring Italian city states. This is the time in history when Spain was ascendant. Ferdinand and Isabella had just finished reconquering Hispania and Columbus was on his voyages to the "Indies". Italy was disorganized and at the mercy of all the world's great powers (Spain, France and 'the Empire' aka. the Germans).

Machiavelli, despite being a very skilled civil servant, had been forceably retired from public life in semi exile on his farm within sight of the city of Florence.

Written in 1514, The Prince is a practical manual for ruling a kingdom that he wrote in an effort to get rehired as an advisor to an ascendant young nobleman. It didn't work - and he never again worked in politics, but his manual slowly gained a reputation around the nobles of Europe both as being an immoral work on statecraft that excused evil, but also as clear-eyed realistic advice on what it takes to rule.

The book is short, and even today is extremely readable and surprisingly modern. It is a fun read. Machiavelli gets right to the point on what a prince must and must not do and why.

Typical Machiavelli advice:

Bad things (like killing enemies) should be done all at once and not often repeated. Good things done periodically and in new and unexpected ways.

You will make worse enemies confiscating property than killing enemies. A man will sooner forgive that you killed his father than that you stole his patrimony.

Is it better to be loved or feared? Both, if you can manage it. But if you cannot be both, then it is much better to be feared. Love moves your allies to help you in good times, but only fear motivates them to help you in hard times. The worst is to be hated (from too much raping and pillaging) or not respected (from cowardive, indecisiveness or the worst: effeminacy). In both cases you will soon lose your kingdom.

After each piece of direct advice like this there is a short explanation of the dynamics involved, and then some practical examples from history - that cut right to the point - for the busy monarch who doesn't have time for florid (and effeminate) language.

Some of it is quite based: "Fortune is a woman. If she is to be submissive it is necessary to beat and coerce her."

A smart person can read it in a few evenings.

Very interesting. I once read that Nixon was the only true Machiavellian president.

I’ll have to give this one a read one day.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Woodpecker
Very interesting. I once read that Nixon was the only true Machiavellian president.

I’ll have to give this one a read one day.
If someone said that about Nixon then I think it was a dig at Nixon, trying to paint him as a Machiavellian villain.

Lincoln was very machiavellian. Using blackmail to submit the opposition and shutting down the hostile press. Very different from the altruistic Lincoln that is usually presented today.
 
I read Snow Crash but I don't remember anything about it. I suggest reading Neal Stephenson's three book series "The Baroque Cycle." I also really liked his book Cyrptonomicon.

I heard both the Baroque Cycle and Cryptonomicon were essential books to understand finance and money and contain deep insights into finance and money. Is this true?

I have never read them.
 

C-Note

Hummingbird
Gold Member
I heard both the Baroque Cycle and Cryptonomicon were essential books to understand finance and money and contain deep insights into finance and money. Is this true?

I have never read them.
Not just finance, but how the networked, interconnected system of the entire modern world works, including science, medicine, finance, communication, and commerce. There's a reason why the phrase, "system of the world" is used repeatedly in the Baroque Cycle, because it explains, via historical fiction, how less than 100 uber-geniuses (almost all men) took humanity from a primitive, isolated state into an accelerating enlightened era in less than 100 years. Cryptonomicon also goes into it to some extent. I think it's that book that has a long epilogue on how the Internet was established worldwide so quickly.
 

ball dont lie

Kingfisher
Gold Member
"The Culture of Narcissism" By Christopher Lasch


Looks interesting and I saw a couple other books by him that interested me. Thanks for sharing this book. I am always looking for good books I can listen to while walking the dog, cooking, cleaning, etc.

Have any other top books you would recommend? Non-fiction and fiction both
 

The Penitent Man

Kingfisher
I finished "The Culture of Narcissism" By Christopher Lasch. It's probably one of the best books I've read in a while. Laches Chapters on Authority, Family Life and, Irony in my opinion are his best Chapters. Overall 9.5/10.
I think that book was written in the 70s and as I recall it read like it was written yesterday. The fall has been a long time coming.
 

sorengard

Chicken
I just finished 'Imperium' by Yockey (hardcover 900 page version). It was good, Yockey not only influenced politics in America by writing for Fr Coughlin's 'Social Justice' he influenced Mussolini and started his own European Party in England because he had disagreements with Mosley. Yockey would be arrested several times, have several pseudonyms on his passport's and injure a FBI Officer, Yockey would die in jail by swallowing a cyanid pill. Highly recommend if you are interested in 3rd position philosophy and understanding America's and Europe's modern struggle.
Yockey on Liberalism:

A moment’s reflection shows that Liberalism is entirely negative. It is not a formative force, but always and only a disintegrating force. […] Liberalism is, in one word, weakness. […] Liberalism is an escape from hardness into softness, from masculinity into femininity, from History to herd-grazing, from reality into herbivorous dreams.

He wrote that almost 75 years ago.
 
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