Where to escape coronavirus lockdowns/tyranny?

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Two places to consider that I hadn't before:

1) Bosnia Herzegovina and 2) Moldova.

Why these two?

Update on Russia.

I was in Moscow, mentioned earlier in the thread. Very low on masks indoors.

I got on the train to an obscure sub-500K city. The woman verifying passports for the train was unmasked. I was moved into three different sleeping cabins as people wanted to move themselves in with their wife/girlfriend. None were wearing masks. Shared a cabin with a guy who would have his bank accounts closed for having the wrong ideas if he lived in The US, unmasked though he was vaxxed. None of the reception or restaurant staff in my hotel are wearing a mask. Everything is open. Churches are maskless. Shops are maskless. Only seen masks worn by two supermarket clerks.

This is apparently correct -



I doubt they will open up too much to travel and entry is limited to certain passport and residency visa holders. UAE visas, which are easily obtained, can enter with a negative test. I imagine you could also enter with a visa to learn Russian in a university.

Entry requirements : https://www.aeroflot.ru/xx-en/covid-19?_preferredLocale=xx&_preferredLanguage=en
 

aynrus

 
Banned
Why these two?

Update on Russia.

I was in Moscow, mentioned earlier in the thread. Very low on masks indoors.

I got on the train to an obscure sub-500K city. The woman verifying passports for the train was unmasked. I was moved into three different sleeping cabins as people wanted to move themselves in with their wife/girlfriend. None were wearing masks. Shared a cabin with a guy who would have his bank accounts closed for having the wrong ideas if he lived in The US, unmasked though he was vaxxed. None of the reception or restaurant staff in my hotel are wearing a mask. Everything is open. Churches are maskless. Shops are maskless. Only seen masks worn by two supermarket clerks.

This is apparently correct -



I doubt they will open up too much to travel and entry is limited to certain passport and residency visa holders. UAE visas, which are easily obtained, can enter with a negative test. I imagine you could also enter with a visa to learn Russian in a university.

Entry requirements : https://www.aeroflot.ru/xx-en/covid-19?_preferredLocale=xx&_preferredLanguage=en

Good to know there're only few masks. I'll be heading to live in the Southern region of Russia that's always been especially low on mask compliance, it's a different world versus Moscow area (sort of like Florida versus NYC). But Putin made one of the cities in Crimea to enforce vaxx requirement (not testing option) to check into a hotel. This was back in summer, not sure how it all played out. Russia is a very corrupt country and that's when you understand that corruption is not all bad thing...it has good sides, clearly and things can be bought there, just like in Ukraine. Honestly, I can't even track all this nonsense anymore, especially in Russia, because it's starting to make me have very heavy feelings, so I'm just going to power through the move rain or shine.
 

Don Quixote

Ostrich
Orthodox Inquirer
Why these two?

Update on Russia.

I was in Moscow, mentioned earlier in the thread. Very low on masks indoors.

I got on the train to an obscure sub-500K city. The woman verifying passports for the train was unmasked. I was moved into three different sleeping cabins as people wanted to move themselves in with their wife/girlfriend. None were wearing masks. Shared a cabin with a guy who would have his bank accounts closed for having the wrong ideas if he lived in The US, unmasked though he was vaxxed. None of the reception or restaurant staff in my hotel are wearing a mask. Everything is open. Churches are maskless. Shops are maskless. Only seen masks worn by two supermarket clerks.

This is apparently correct -



I doubt they will open up too much to travel and entry is limited to certain passport and residency visa holders. UAE visas, which are easily obtained, can enter with a negative test. I imagine you could also enter with a visa to learn Russian in a university.

Entry requirements : https://www.aeroflot.ru/xx-en/covid-19?_preferredLocale=xx&_preferredLanguage=en

I haven't looked at those countries closely, I was hoping others on the forum had insights. I mention them because they are in the general region we have been talking about, but seem to be flying under the radar. Both are very poor, perhaps two of the poorest states in Europe. To my knowledge they are not on the table for EU entrance or anything like that, so they don't have the pressure to institute mandates. I think Bosnia is used by the EU as some kind of energy producing coal-factory state. Just a suspicion. I don't know anything about Moldova, other than it's extremely poor.
 

aynrus

 
Banned
I haven't looked at those countries closely, I was hoping others on the forum had insights. I mention them because they are in the general region we have been talking about, but seem to be flying under the radar. Both are very poor, perhaps two of the poorest states in Europe. To my knowledge they are not on the table for EU entrance or anything like that, so they don't have the pressure to institute mandates. I think Bosnia is used by the EU as some kind of energy producing coal-factory state. Just a suspicion. I don't know anything about Moldova, other than it's extremely poor.
Bosnia applied for EU membership in 2016.
 

El Draque

 
Banned
Orthodox
Never heard much good about Moldova. Back in the Pick Up days it was painted as some sort of shangrilla, but every report i read said it was an absolute dump, and aside from the alleged superficial attractiveness of the women, i never heard of many people staying there anything like long term. The main city is supposed to be very ugly, the worst kind of Communist built city. The place was rinsed absolutely by Oligarchs in the 90s. You won't get anywhere without speaking Russian for sure.
 

brotherjimbob

 
Banned
Why these two?

Update on Russia.

I was in Moscow, mentioned earlier in the thread. Very low on masks indoors.

I got on the train to an obscure sub-500K city. The woman verifying passports for the train was unmasked. I was moved into three different sleeping cabins as people wanted to move themselves in with their wife/girlfriend. None were wearing masks. Shared a cabin with a guy who would have his bank accounts closed for having the wrong ideas if he lived in The US, unmasked though he was vaxxed. None of the reception or restaurant staff in my hotel are wearing a mask. Everything is open. Churches are maskless. Shops are maskless. Only seen masks worn by two supermarket clerks.

This is apparently correct -



I doubt they will open up too much to travel and entry is limited to certain passport and residency visa holders. UAE visas, which are easily obtained, can enter with a negative test. I imagine you could also enter with a visa to learn Russian in a university.

Entry requirements : https://www.aeroflot.ru/xx-en/covid-19?_preferredLocale=xx&_preferredLanguage=en


That's huge news...

I was worried Belarus would go down the mandatory route under pressure from Russia.
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
Never heard much good about Moldova. Back in the Pick Up days it was painted as some sort of shangrilla, but every report i read said it was an absolute dump, and aside from the alleged superficial attractiveness of the women, i never heard of many people staying there anything like long term. The main city is supposed to be very ugly, the worst kind of Communist built city. The place was rinsed absolutely by Oligarchs in the 90s. You won't get anywhere without speaking Russian for sure.

I have been to Moldova twice and this is quite accurate. Though I only stayed in the capital, as I didn't and still don't know enough Russian to be happy to wonder about elsewhere. I wrote a little on it here.

I don't know the best words to describe it, but you can feel the undercurrent of a low-trust, rootless, post-traditional society. In most places you will see people who look quite weather-beaten, wearing sports clothes and looking physically tough despite not being beefcakes. There is a meldding of the soul-crushing spirit of Russian communism with the more Southern Euopean nature of the careless Romanian. If there was one country in Europe I could pick not to have a fight with someone from - it would be Moldova.

It is certainly not a friendly place and you can see many people have tough lives. There are more women of the praying mantis type. There is a high veneration for wealth, which is displayed gaudishly a la "Meanwhile in Russia" style.

I was there about a year ago. It was masks indoors and a lot of shops had guys checking tempuratures for entry, but other than that it didn't seem people cared.

Apparently 40% of Moldovans go to church, but it is hard to see it.

20200115-131231.jpg


20200116-134154.jpg


20200116-154954.jpg


I got an update on Ukraine, which is that it seems to be the same as Russia - in shops, and on public transport you might see one person in a mask. People don't want to take the vaccine.

I will see if I can get one for Moldova.

I think the FSU (minus central Asia) is probably the second best bet after centralish-America.

I would much prefer to be in Republika Srpska (RS) in Bosnia. I have not been to Bosnia, but even smaller Serbian cities have a much more provincial and placid nature. I doubt it will be able to join The EU as RS is in the process of trying to break away and it seems NATO will ultimately allow it.

Another option is to look at Pridnestrovie, a small break-away region between Ukraine and Moldova. I tried to go there last year, but it was closed. These was no information about entry online. It is much more like Russia and doesn't have the unwelcoming atmosphere of Moldova. It's very cheap. But Belarus is probably still better value for money. An good apartment in the centre of Minsk costs about $500. The same sort or thing in Moscow would be $2,000-3,000. A wonderland for those who like protein bars. You can get good ones for about $0.70.
 

aynrus

 
Banned
I have been to Moldova twice and this is quite accurate. Though I only stayed in the capital, as I didn't and still don't know enough Russian to be happy to wonder about elsewhere. I wrote a little on it here.

I don't know the best words to describe it, but you can feel the undercurrent of a low-trust, rootless, post-traditional society. In most places you will see people who look quite weather-beaten, wearing sports clothes and looking physically tough despite not being beefcakes. There is a meldding of the soul-crushing spirit of Russian communism with the more Southern Euopean nature of the careless Romanian. If there was one country in Europe I could pick not to have a fight with someone from - it would be Moldova.

It is certainly not a friendly place and you can see many people have tough lives. There are more women of the praying mantis type. There is a high veneration for wealth, which is displayed gaudishly a la "Meanwhile in Russia" style.

I was there about a year ago. It was masks indoors and a lot of shops had guys checking tempuratures for entry, but other than that it didn't seem people cared.

Apparently 40% of Moldovans go to church, but it is hard to see it.

20200115-131231.jpg


20200116-134154.jpg


20200116-154954.jpg

Man those pictures hit a little close to home....looks like around where I grew up in Russia on the border of the city of Moscow. :laughter: I got nostalgic seeing that dog eating trash. Back in the 90s the dog itself was becoming a meal next, way too often.
There's plenty of that stuff and worse in Russia. They call them "places where the 90s never stopped"
 
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aynrus

 
Banned
Another option is to look at Pridnestrovie, a small break-away region between Ukraine and Moldova. I tried to go there last year, but it was closed. These was no information about entry online. It is much more like Russia and doesn't have the unwelcoming atmosphere of Moldova. It's very cheap. But Belarus is probably still better value for money. An good apartment in the centre of Minsk costs about $500. The same sort or thing in Moscow would be $2,000-3,000. A wonderland for those who like protein bars. You can get good ones for about $0.70.

$0.70 for a protein bar?
Where? That's insanely expensive. Wow.
Moscow is an expensive hellhole that's for sure, I don't even want to transfer planes in Moscow region but there's no other way.
 

AntoniusofEfa

 
Banned
Has anyone heard of Titus Gebel?


He would like to set up private cities, run by a private company, where each citizen has a contract with that private company. The contract cannot be changed by one side (like the current citizen government relationship). I heard in an interview that he found land and a willing government somewhere in Central America.

I have not read the book yet, but it is on the to-do list.
 

aynrus

 
Banned
Another option is to look at Pridnestrovie, a small break-away region between Ukraine and Moldova. I tried to go there last year, but it was closed. These was no information about entry online.
Not sure how one can make a life in Pridnestrovie/Transnistria...it's unrecognized disputed territory like Kosovo but even worse from the standpoint of chances of it being resolved without another war there, so property rights and any residency permit probably do not have lasting legal standing there.
 

aynrus

 
Banned
Has anyone heard of Titus Gebel?


He would like to set up private cities, run by a private company, where each citizen has a contract with that private company. The contract cannot be changed by one side (like the current citizen government relationship). I heard in an interview that he found land and a willing government somewhere in Central America.

I have not read the book yet, but it is on the to-do list.
Sounds like something Klaus Schwab wants to do but worldwide... seems like slavery.
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
$0.70 for a protein bar?
Where? That's insanely expensive. Wow.

They can cost $3-4 elsewhere. For some reason the same ones that cost a lot elsewhere were less than a dollar. The food was so cheap I suspected it must be subsidised.

This one had the biggest selection I have ever seem. Aptly named Korona -


I don't like to cook and like to eat a lot of protein, so they are useful. But anywhere else any you are spending $5-10 per day on bars.
 

aynrus

 
Banned
They can cost $3-4 elsewhere. For some reason the same ones that cost a lot elsewhere were less than a dollar. The food was so cheap I suspected it must be subsidised.

This one had the biggest selection I have ever seem. Aptly named Korona -


I don't like to cook and like to eat a lot of protein, so they are useful. But anywhere else any you are spending $5-10 per day on bars.
$3-4 protein bars? I guess you meant the same brand costs $4 and $0.70 elsewhere. Yes, might be fake.
But $0.70 is very, very expensive for outside the wealthy countries.
Belarus is big on fake counterfeited foods by the way. One can not trust labels there.
 

AntoniusofEfa

 
Banned
Sounds like something Klaus Schwab wants to do but worldwide... seems like slavery.
As of now, there is no free will contract between a citizen and the government. You are forced into that relationship. Imagine having multiple cities, each competing for the best citizens. That's a whole different concept. Some freak like Schwab would have no power in that scenario: no one would want to move to his cities.
 

JohnKreese

Pelican
Catholic
$3-4 protein bars? I guess you meant the same brand costs $4 and $0.70 elsewhere. Yes, might be fake.
But $0.70 is very, very expensive for outside the wealthy countries.
Belarus is big on fake counterfeited foods by the way. One can not trust labels there.
~40 cent protein bar? Pics (with macros) or it didn't happen
 

aynrus

 
Banned
As of now, there is no free will contract between a citizen and the government. You are forced into that relationship. Imagine having multiple cities, each competing for the best citizens. That's a whole different concept. Some freak like Schwab would have no power in that scenario: no one would want to move to his cities.
I ain't not signing no non-revocable "contracts" with no private "corporation".
That sounds like a nightmare...imagine your lawyer didn't read the contract too well or some grey areas in in it.
Anyway, when you live many years you know you change over time and what worked and was welcome before no longer works down the road. But the contract does not change.

You can get out of the country and renounce your citizenship. Your contract with your government is revocable.
If you don't want to get another citizenship, which normally would be the case, you can even live as stateless person, though this is not an easy life. Contract with the government also can be voluntarily, such as for naturalized citizens.

But if you enter a non-revocable contract with some corporation you're still bound by the same citizenship law, unless you renounce citizenship - corporation contract does not give you any new recognized citizenship and you won't even be legal in a new country, being fully at the mercy of that corporation and at the mercy of that country's immigration law. All of this sounds like a typical scam.
 
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aynrus

 
Banned
~40 cent protein bar? Pics (with macros) or it didn't happen
Not sure what you mean? $0.70 is a lot of money in a poor country to spend on food that's not even a full meal.
I eat only organic/natural/whole foods, but protein bars, one can often buy them for $1 in the States, very expensive country.
 

JohnKreese

Pelican
Catholic
Not sure what you mean? $0.70 is a lot of money in a poor country to spend on food.
I eat only organic/natural/whole foods, but protein bars, one can often buy them for $1 in the States, very expensive country.
From your earlier post you stated that 70 cents is too expensive for a protein bar, implying that one could find them much cheaper in other places.

Reading again, maybe your were implying that 70 cents is just too expensive in general in some places (as opposed to there being a much cheaper option in the alluded to locales...?)
 

aynrus

 
Banned
From your earlier post you stated that 70 cents is too expensive for a protein bar, implying that one could find them much cheaper in other places.

Reading again, maybe your were implying that 70 cents is just too expensive in general in some places (as opposed to there being a much cheaper option in the alluded to locales...?)

Yes it's way too expensive for a protein bar.
One can make dirt cheap protein bars at home if they want one, and ingredients for these would be cheap in a cheap country.

$0.70 is insanely expensive for Belarus, I already mentioned $1 protein bars in the expensive US where people make 15 times more money on average.
Don't see the point arguing this further, this is not what this thread is for.
 
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