Where to escape coronavirus lockdowns/tyranny?

In some Europe's eastern countries and also some mediterraneans like Spain, Italy, probably Greece (I'm not familiar with Greece, but from a few Greeks living in the UK I've met), you will find people willing to bend or circumvent the rules. For example I read about some docs at least in Romania and Spain giving patients vax certs without actually injecting them, this would never happen in the UK or any of the other legalistic and irreligious, more 'affluent' countries.
Also Bulgaria has a very low vax uptake according to the official vax trackers, suspending for a minute my total disregard for the info put out by the WHO and the likes, so kudos to the Bulgarians. But also what I mentioned before about some spanish docs is just another indication of how false those statistics most likely are.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
Bulgaria has a low vax rate and I can confirm even with that a decent % of the statistically vaxxed....did not get the shot.

When my wife was back there this summer she commented about how casually all her friends spoke about getting a vax passport and the nurses simply tossing the vax in the garbage. The going rate is $300 USD.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
Bulgarians in my experience are skeptical of vaccines in general.

Paying off your pediatrician for your children's school vax passport is somewhat common. Bulgaria has the useful type of corruption. Just like it's still common to pay off a cop to avoid a speeding ticket.

That's why I say no matter what the news says on the ground level I doubt anything serious gets implemented there. The people who would do the enforcing don't earn enough and bribery is still common. And they're very matter of fact about it. It's a simple business transaction without judgement. It's not the west.

But that's once inside the country. They might get stricter at the border. Who knows.
 

thetruewhitenorth

Robin
Orthodox
Anyone looking to start a garden, look into "no dig" agriculture. I am going to be allocating a batch this autumn in my garden to experiment with the concept. It should save a lot of unnecessary work and benefit the soil.
I put up two small raised garden beds about 1x1 meter each this past spring. It was just an experiment. BUT, it provided us with an abundance of cherrie tomatoes until recently, a lot of parsley and chives.

I made many mistakes by planting too much stuff on such a small area, so for example carrots, garlic and squash didnt grow much because it was too crowded.

However, what I learnt is even in a small garden you can grow a lot of food. Also, living either in a warm climate or having a green house one can assure food supply probably most of the year.

Imagine having a chicken coop as well. That's my dream, living on an acreage somewhere warm like South America.
 

kel

Ostrich
That's usually what happens. Wasn't Poland but I overstayed once elsewhere in the world and paid a fine upon exit and got a stamp in my visa saying that I would not be allowed to do visa-free travel there for a few years.

Poland, though, under normal circumstances though how would they even know you didn't leave by land? How long do you have to leave for, and how long do you have to stay out? Seems like you could even just say "oh yeah, I went to Slovakia (or, if it's a Schengen thing, Ukraine say) by land for a while in the middle there, then came back by land. Totally different 'trip'".
 

Coja Petrus Uscan

Crow
Orthodox Inquirer
Gold Member
When my wife was back there this summer she commented about how casually all her friends spoke about getting a vax passport and the nurses simply tossing the vax in the garbage. The going rate is $300 USD.

Your wife must move in high circles. The going rate in Kazakhstan is about 10% of that -


The woman described making arrangements with a nurse to fake the process of vaccination from start to finish – even taking the trouble to go to the clinic (none of the other staff were aware of the deception) to make the story stand up.

“I went into the treatment room. They just jabbed me, but poured the contents into a bucket. Then I sat for the required time after the vaccination, and that was it,” she said.

She repeated the process for her second false dose, paying 20,000 tenge ($46) for the service. Others reported paying as little as 5,000 tenge ($12).
 

Johnnyvee

Ostrich
Anyone on the ground on the Canary Islands (Gran Canaria, Tenerife) at the moment? How is the situation there in regards to restrictions, vaccine-pass requirements, masks etc.
 

Going strong

Crow
Gold Member
Much respect to the courageous, industrious American guy above.
But, is it me or his DIY house is tilting? And it's not even Winter.

In any case, he's speaking so fast and so much, the bears must be leaving the woods with headaches, which is a good thing. They'll be back for Winter though, with a (Siberian) grudge.

Also, where does his Internet come from, set as he is in the middle of Siberia? Somehow it's disturbing that people (men, not even women) would be tweeting/posting even from the deepest wilderness of Siberian forests... Well, thinking it over, if it's to spread truths and make honest money, why not.
 
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rainy

Kingfisher
A Siberian valley far from an internet hookup is home to an unlikely online celebrity: an American who broadcasts – in fluent Russian – his views on farming, fatherhood and faith.

With an infectious, barrel-chested laugh, Justus Walker has attracted almost 90,000 YouTube subscribers over the last few years. At one point along the way he became the unwitting face of the Russian government’s import substitution campaign to fight Western sanctions.

Walker’s videos today center on his “dream farm,” which he is building five kilometers from the nearest village in the Altai Mountains. The closest town, Byisk, is about 150 kilometers away. There is no mobile connection – just lush mountains in every direction. Internet is available only by satellite.

 

SeaEagle

Robin
Much respect to the courageous, industrious American guy above.
But, is it me or his DIY house is tilting? And it's not even Winter.

In any case, he's speaking so fast and so much, the bears must be leaving the woods with headaches, which is a good thing. They'll be back for Winter though, with a (Siberian) grudge.

Also, where does his Internet come from, set as he is in the middle of Siberia? Somehow it's disturbing that people (men, not even women) would be tweeting/posting even from the deepest wilderness of Siberian forests... Well, thinking it over, if it's to spread truths and make honest money, why not.
Maybe its a heavy concrete pad in the Taiga permafrost scenario. I hope not.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
This really isn't about escaping. On one level it is but it's more about developing a new mission and purpose in life. The way this guy lives reminds me of how we're supposed to live. There's opportunity. But it's about family, land, growing, providing, independence, self sufficiency, etc.

 
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This dude is interesting. An American living in Siberia with his family. Built a house. Farms. His Russian youtube has a large following.

Probably not doable for most but if you actually wanted to live like this you could. I doubt COVID impacts him.

It looks and sounds great. But the reality is that running a farm like that singlehandedly, not only takes working the land and animal husbandry, but also house, and out buildings, equipment and vehicles maintenance and repairs is way more than any full time job. So on top of all that having time to run a YT channel, making and editing videos with graphics and all, and not to mention having reliable elecricity and fast internet connection in the middle of nowhere. I don't know, call me cynical but I have to take it all with not a grain but a lump of salt.
 

rainy

Kingfisher
I thought this was a pretty decent video showing some of the sites in Sofia and what it's like walking the streets there. I miss the place. The Roman ruins throughout the city are pretty cool.


Here's another. Both from this month. And this dude went to JJ Murphy's!

 
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