Why do all new buildings in America look like this?

Roosh

Cardinal
I thought it was only an east coast thing, but I saw these buildings everywhere. It's the standard design for all new buildings.

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Lampwick

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Maximization of land. Typically they are all condos, so the more units you can fit, the more money you make. That results in the ugly box design that goes all the way to the edge of the property line.
 
Well, the buildings are actually kinda large, so I think the design helps to break that up so it doesnt look like one huge monolithic block.
 

Oz.

Pelican
I’ve noticed this too, but, then again will America ever be an architectural wonder? I have been to numerous cities in many states and not one has left me impressed in terms of architecture.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Let's test this theory. If you see one of these in your town, post it in this thread.

Do these count?

Both are student housing and have funny names that sound like smartphone models, like "The K90" or "The 666"



 

Biz

Kingfisher
They're all mixed-use buildings. Residential on top and commercial on bottom floor(s). The residential units are getting smaller each year and commanding much more per square foot.

The buildings are of decent value for a renter as they command basically no money down and offer many amenities usually including a pool, gym, concierge, lounge area, free coffee, package storage, etc.
 
High-rise buildings will always be difficult to build beautifully I think. The last one is 11 floors and wider still. They still only make up a small percentage of housing though. Modern housing I think should look more like inner city areas in Southern Europe. 3-4 story townhouses with a higher density allround vs the Inner City or Suburbs choice you have in America.
 

Easy_C

Crow
Because a lot of these buildings are designed by investing firms who are just trying to throw up the cheapest building possible to generate some cash flows that they can then convert into securities and sell on the capital markets. They’re thrown up in a very short amount of time by “lowest bidder” contractors who just try to make them look decent by putting a cheap front on the building designed to appeal to “trendy” millenials.


I know of what I speak when it comes to this topic.
 

StarcraftGG

Sparrow
easier to build squares and rectangles than circles. assuming these are concrete structures. rounded edges at building perimeters require radius formwork which is more expensive.
 

RexImperator

Crow
Gold Member
Let’s call it a version of modernism with a retro flair, rejecting post-modernism and nostalgic for mid-20th-century architecture.

Works well with cheap IKEA furniture.
 

pitbullowner

Kingfisher
debeguiled said:
Let's test this theory. If you see one of these in your town, post it in this thread.

Do these count?

Both are student housing and have funny names that sound like smartphone models, like "The K90" or "The 666"



They're all over the place in Nashville when I do my Uber/Lyft runs...I hate it so bad. It looks lazy
 

Roosh

Cardinal
debeguiled said:
Let's test this theory. If you see one of these in your town, post it in this thread.

Do these count?

Both are student housing and have funny names that sound like smartphone models, like "The K90" or "The 666"
They usually use the numerical address and add "The" before it to make it sound sexy.
 

Enoch

Ostrich
There is SO much red tape and cost escalation now in real estate development & actual construction that what appears to be a cheap developer/contractor getting over is sometimes the only way for a development to be viable.

If it were possible to see a time lapse of a skyscraper going up in the 20s versus today the safety redundancies of today versus yesteryear would blow your mind. Not necessarily a bad thing.
 

Gimlet

Woodpecker
I agree that it looks very much like Bauhaus. Bauhaus was a school of architecture in The Weimar Republic; the time period coincided with the Weimar Republic push of trannyism, homosexuality and general degenerative hypersexuality... which of course we have today. Perhaps this style of architecture has a negative impact on one's soul, just as the tranny/homo sexuality does.
 

H1N1

Ostrich
Gold Member
Honestly I think they are beautiful, and I bet they are great to live in - loads of natural light, well insulated, comfortable, and probably extremely affordable. I like them. The fact that they are popping up everywhere is also great. We have such a deficit of affordable housing in the UK, it's a real problem. I'd love to see these popping up everywhere in the UK, both because I personally think their functionality is itself attractive, and because it would be a great sign of a country full of confidence and invested in its future.
 
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