Why do all new buildings in America look like this?

Oberrheiner

Pelican
The amount of norms such a stadium has to fulfill also dictates its shape a lot, safety, fire, handicapped access etc.
Also these old stadiums were built before big rock shows were a thing, so they sound like shit.
Those built nowadays are so big that there are not that many companies who can build them anyway, plus capitalism did its concentration job, so yeah they all look the same.

But hey at least you don't have to live in them :)
Give me an ugly stadium rather than an ugly house any day !
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
Found more architectural eye bleach in the form of more photos of that Greene and Greene house that is still for sale in Pasadena if you have four million. It looks a bit like a Japanese village itself.

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/...9UlFva8WfeFLCFXPtiY8UCMhoJPwXxsICCGr3ERrewsrA

How about that courtyard?





 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
^ The square, enclosed courtyard patio with the fountain is typically Spanish/Moorish, part of the cultural heritage in California.

In Japan you have gardens with Japanese maple trees and koi ponds that are alongside the house, as opposed to tiled open courtyard patios which are better suited to mediterranean climates.
 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
911 said:
^ The square, enclosed courtyard patio with the fountain is typically Spanish/Moorish, part of the cultural heritage in California.

In Japan you have gardens with Japanese maple trees and koi ponds that are alongside the house, as opposed to tiled open courtyard patios which are better suited to mediterranean climates.

Well, yeah, these architects were merging styles, taking a lot of influence from Japan. I wasn't implying these were pure Japanese designs.

Anyway, a lot of town houses, as in the video I posted have those enclosed courtyards in Kyoto, for ventilation and light.

 

911

Peacock
Gold Member
It's too cold half the year in Kyoto to keep an open patio, and too rainy most of the summer during the monsoon season, but yeah those small gardens are awesome.

 

debeguiled

Peacock
Gold Member
We should all just be thankful that we live in a modern world with modern building techniques and don't have to rely on the same materials they used 400 years ago.

 

2 Cool 4 U

Woodpecker
You see these in large West Coast metros like Seattle, Portland, Bay Area, LA, Denver, etc...

Leftists in those cities demand developers to build dwellings with modern designs, plus those buildings help drive up property areas in their areas.
 

Lace em up

Woodpecker
As it was told to me, hipsters all want to live in converted warehouses, so they build them to look as such.

If you want to live in a shipping container, you're probably a hipster.

 

kosko

Peacock
Gold Member
polar said:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One-plus-five

One-plus-five, also known as five-over-one, or a podium building[1], is a type of multi-family residential building commonly found in urban areas of North America.[2][3] The mid-rise buildings are normally constructed with four or five wood frame stories above a concrete podium (usually housing retail or resident amenity space). The one-plus-five style of buildings exploded in popularity in the 2010s, following a 2009 revision to the International Building Code which allowed up to five stories of wood-framed construction.[4]

In short: this style of construction allows to build up to five floors entirely out of wood, which is much cheaper than other materials. To make up for the commonplace layout, the architects attempt to experiment with "unique" facade designs.

Developers like this style as it's cheap and quick to build. Still, it dosn't remedy the ugly design and facades we see in the exterior. Mass market architects dump out designs like these from templates very easily and quickly and don't push for any better design considerations and if they do recommend silly stuff that adds bloat and not much to the ability not add value to $/sqft.

A quick remedy would be for design codes that outlaw ugly exterior crap. The approach to set code is common in Europe where you have to very strong and stringent adherence to exterior. Of course one can make the argument that higher property values in Europe make this much easier as you won't get there same dollar on testing down some shitty strip-mall in Austin Texas to build a one-plus-five. There is also the argument of what is getting built. Quick and dirty condo projects that intended to be sold off versus long value rental holdings where using better materials (that last) will make more sense as you're holding the investment for much longer. In the end quality and design should be a price to pay. But developers don't have much rope as government forces silly taxes and fees there eat up margins of where a developer could explore more quality materials and finishes.
 

SlickyBoy

Ostrich
I think this thread could just as easily be "Why do all restaurants look (and taste) like this?" Seems as though it's rare to find a restaurant that isn't part of some chain, either national or regional, that has everything dialed in from the drinks to the menu to the architecture.

And yeah, that means it's all geared towards the atomized, childless female buyer, even if the pretense of the establishment leans masculine (e.g., micro breweries).

The McCulture may not be as obvious as a row of fast food chains, but as with apartments most development in the food service industry does not happen organically anymore - pun intended.
 
This sort of building style speaks to a design ethos that caters to millennials who want to live in mixed use developments and pay out the nose for the privilege.

Developers are all about cutting corners, doing things cookie-cutter, and are always unoriginal. The only thing that makes me angrier is that my compatriots are wasting their savings to live in soulless abodes like these.

Hate to sound like a boomer, but they need to get in houses.
 
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