Why Do You Consume Secular Content?

Roosh

Cardinal
Orthodox
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-music-occult-1024x683.jpg

At risk of reproaching fellow Christians, I am continually surprised by how much secular content they consume. From Facebook to TikTok, from Hollywood movies to pop music, I suspect the average Christian is bombarding his soul with several hours of secular content per week. Do they not know that this consumption may be separating them from God and weakening their faith?

When I first returned to God in the spring of 2019, I was wholly immersed in secular culture. I made several Twitter posts a day (usually about politics or the misbehavior of women), listened to popular music, watched movies, consumed all manner of YouTube videos, and read self-help books. I followed dozens of social media accounts, devoured the news, and placed myself in venues of the night to be bombarded with devil music for hours at a stretch. Secular content was normal to me, and I didn’t give my habits a second thought until the growing grace of God within me could not reconcile the spirit from where all this content came. It did not worship God explicitly nor implicitly, and so it was not of God, even if it did not mention a bad word about God. If Satan could package his efforts into a motto, it would be anything but God, which is exactly how we can sum up all secular content.

It is three years going and I’m still tapering myself off secular content—that’s how entwined it was into my life. Even today I use the news as a source of entertainment to relieve natural lulls in the work day and as a means of procrastinating from spiritual duties. I didn’t realize how attached I was to it until I began the weaning process, especially when it came to music.

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My Spotify account was loaded with custom playlists of modern music, from folk covers of pop songs to oldies rock. The first thing I’d do when getting in my car is load up a playlist to listen with pleasure, but I began to perceive in my soul that this was wrong, because while listening to these songs, I never once thought of God. I wish I could say that I deleted all my favorite music in one go, but it was a gradual process: first I quit the modern music, rationalizing that “oldies” was okay, but an examination of their woman-idolizing lyrics revealed that oldies wasn’t safe either.

As a Gen X’er, deleting my Red Hot Chili Peppers playlist was challenging indeed, but like any drug, once you abstain for a while, your brain adapts to a healthier new normal. Now, I’m exposed to modern music mainly through passing cars or when I’m shopping in a store, and what strikes me is how I ever considered such a modern cacophony of sounds to be pleasing to my ears. Even better, my concentration has improved, particularly during prayer and long church services. I don’t have snippets of words or tunes bombarding my mind like in the past.

Father Seraphim Rose had a word to say about Orthodox Christians who continue to consume secular content:

Fr. Seraphim saw this “plastic” approach to religion most graphically when a young pilgrim, having spent time at another monastery in America, came to Platina [monastery] talking all about elders, hesychasm, Jesus Prayer, true monasticism, and the ascetic wisdom of the Holy Fathers. One day Fr. Seraphim saw him walking around the monastery singing rock songs, snapping his fingers and bouncing with the rhythm. Surprised, Fr. Seraphim asked him if he didn’t think this might go against all his interest in spirituality, but the young man just shrugged his shoulders and replied: “No, there’s no contradiction. Whenever I want spirituality, I just switch on the Elder” — meaning that he could take out his rock tape and put in a tape of his Elder giving a spiritual discourse. The fact that this young man could compartmentalize his life like this, Fr. Seraphim understood, showed that something was missing in the basic formation of his soul. —His Life and Works (p. 1048). St. Herman Press.

May I ask you why you consume the creations of non-Christians, of those who don’t live by Christ, of those who don’t glorify Him? Why do you subject your eyes and ears to content produced by those who—unless they repent—are at high risk of being condemned by God on the Day of Judgment? Why do you listen to music by artists who you know live degenerate, sordid lives, and whose work is helping millions of youth descend into hell? Why do you watch movies produced and directed by Jews who hate Lord Jesus Christ and view abortion as a sacrament? Why are you not concerned about what the secular content is doing to your mind over the long term, locking it in the realm of fantasy and superficiality, how it is leading you into the abyss in exchange for moments of distraction and sensual pleasure? I ask these questions not just to you but also myself, and I did not have a justifiable answer to them, so I began to force myself to sever this attachment.

I’ve since become highly averse to reading, watching, or listening to anything that is produced by someone who does not have a knowable or visible Christian faith. If I get weak and think such content will edify me, perhaps because the non-Christian is “intelligent,” I ask myself how intelligent are they really if they don’t worship their very own Creator in the Church that He built. Do I really need the “wisdom” of someone who is firmly attached to the material world?

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It’s a mistake to believe that Orthodox Christianity is merely a lifestyle add-on that has a slot in your life alongside many other lifestyles. Orthodoxy is the lifestyle. It was called “the way” by early Christians, and it is the only way. Anything that conflicts with it must be looked upon with disdain. Secular content has become so hostile to Christianity, so engineered to distract souls from Christ, that any attachment to it must be likened to a drug addiction. Not only will quitting help you psychologically with anxiety, distraction, and fantasizing, but it will help aid in the salvation of your soul.

To successfully quit secular content, you will have to find something to replace it with. I spend much time reading Orthodox books, but sometimes my ears want to be pleased. In that case, I harness Spotify not to listen to gay disco music but Orthodox hymns and Classical music, made by composers who were not shy about their faith in God. There are also innumerable Orthodox podcasts and YouTube channels, and I hope to never tire of watching bearded Orthodox elders share wisdom in various languages. There are also freely available audio versions of the Bible. Trust me when I say that you’ll find so much wholesome content that you will not have enough time for it all.

Currently, I consume approximately 30-60 minutes of internet news each day, usually from Roosh V Forum, where I know that I’m getting information from a mostly-Christian lens. I do this because, as someone who speaks in the public square, I want my opinions and pronouncements of modern culture to be informed and up-to-date, but even that may only be an excuse, a sign of my worldly attachment. Let the secular world pass away, for it will surely die, and let us focus all our energies on spiritual matters, to get ready for an eternity of the spiritual, where we can all live as one with Lord Jesus Christ.

Read Next: Why Does The Supermarket Play Pop Music?
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Suburban Yahoo

Robin
Protestant
The anecdote about the young man putting the Elder into his tape player shows for him his religion was what he was consuming. So as long as he was consuming religion, he was spiritual. Now, for someone like that, as soon as he's consuming something secular, he becomes secular.

The answer for him isn't just to consume better, more spiritual material.

A key is to get away from your identity being what you consume. This means pushing against the world, because the whole culture is about turning people into consumption addicts.
 

BasilSeal

Kingfisher
Catholic
Gold Member
Can we say that all the above falls under the heading "entertainment"? I'm sure that a Christian life need not be devoid of entertainment, enjoyment, and complementary enrichment of the soul.

I can probably think of half a dozen or more alternate forms of entertainment or hobbies that seem to me to be quite compatible with a Christian life, for enjoyment alone or as a family. I'm curious to hear from others, but I'll offer one to start: Nature walks and photography.
 

PineTreeFarmer

Woodpecker
Woman
Orthodox Inquirer
Can we say that all the above falls under the heading "entertainment"? I'm sure that a Christian life need not be devoid of entertainment, enjoyment, and complementary enrichment of the soul.

I can probably think of half a dozen or more alternate forms of entertainment or hobbies that seem to me to be quite compatible with a Christian life, for enjoyment alone or as a family. I'm curious to hear from others, but I'll offer one to start: Nature walks and photography.
Me and my Mom see who can find the most redundant psalm to read before dinner. It's. Awesome.

As for entertainment, there is a woeful lack of historical fiction for women in the Orthodox realm! Or even like, sci-fi that incorporates facts about the faith. My kids are not going to listen to solemn chants while they're playing Rise of Nations, either, but they might listen to like, metal that incorporates chants. I feel like the reason most people gravitate toward other things than religiosity is because the faith is not open to them.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
I can probably think of half a dozen or more alternate forms of entertainment or hobbies that seem to me to be quite compatible with a Christian life, for enjoyment alone or as a family. I'm curious to hear from others, but I'll offer one to start: Nature walks and photography.
Cycling (especially trail riding and casual mountain biking) and birdwatching are great activities. For indoors, woodworking and other crafting hobbies are fun too.
 

Hermetic Seal

Pelican
Orthodox
Gold Member
Recreational activities can (and should) be part of our lives, even as Orthodox. The key is to keep it in the proper place.

The unquestioned assumption catechized into us from our earliest years by secular culture is that the whole purpose of life is to entertain ourselves. We work and make money to afford entertainment. We entertain ourselves with TV shows, movies, music, games, retail therapy, and so on: activities based entirely around consumption, rather than creation. This is a key difference between these passive entertainments and activities such as gardening, woodworking, home renovation, writing/painting/making music, etc. Even things like hiking, bird watching, or cycling, require your physical involvement and participation, and don't really involve the consumption of anything.

At any rate, our default mode is to reward ourselves with entertainment, which is in many ways treated as the highest goal of life, a goal manufactured entirely by the economic wizards behind the curtain. Without this, there would be no Funko Pop and Marvel movie-consuming bugmen. The bugman is just the extreme and pitiable end product of a culture that has produced this entertainment-centered lifestyle.

If we can replace passive consumption of entertainment with more edifying recreational activities, I think this will go a long way toward breaking our hypnosis to our cultural milieu.

Anyway, Roosh's article is a great illustration of how even for those of us raised in a "conservative Christian" background, our values and assumptions are largely the same as those of surrounding secularized people. Unless you happened to be born into a family of missionaries or something like that, your conservative Christian parents probably wanted you to do well in school, go to college, get a high paying job, and they (and you) probably consumed very similar entertainment and participated in similar activities as your secular peers, with just a few caveats - maybe you weren't allowed to listen to music with too much swearing, or watch R-rated movies, or play M-rated games, but otherwise, not all that different. This article is a clear wake-up call to reevaluate these things that until now have probably gone unnoticed and taken for granted, to really scrutinize what entertainment we consume and analyze what, if any, benefit it really brings. As a young man, my life revolved around playing video games, or listening to music. Now, I wish I'd used most, if not all, of that time more wisely.

For a lot of us, completely cutting off all entertainment cold turkey may not really be feasible, but I think we can cut it down by asking things like this: what emotions does this stimulate? I've thought about this with video games, where I've pretty much stopped playing exciting, violent games that make my heart race, make me physically and mentally tense, even if they don't involved overt violence or other questionable content. Games with a more relaxed and thoughtful pace, that don't spike my emotions, seem more acceptable at this stage. The same goes for music: a lot of what I listen to is fairly mellow and introspective, but that which blasts dopamine through hard, aggressive sounds is stuff I've mostly tried to cut out. This is in addition to the obvious things Roosh has pointed out in his article about troubling lyrical content or songs that are subtly corrosive without being outright evil.

God has given us creative faculties, and making music, film, art, other creative output isn't intrinsically wrong, and engaging in these pursuits can be done to God's glory. It can be spiritually beneficial and we can gain edifying experiences from things that aren't explicitly Orthodox - I think of stuff like The Lord Of The Rings, or Dicken's novels, as some examples off the top of my head. This sort of quality fictional work may be in relatively short supply today, but alternatives to mainstream, Current Year entertainment will help us break our addiction to our cultural overlords and their malcatechetical output.
 

Kitty Tantrum

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
My turn back toward God was bewildering at first, because I started turning away from all of these things before I even realized or understood what was happening.

I've never been particularly attached to "entertainment" but it used to be pretty easy for friends to drag me into whatever they were doing for "fun." ("You HAVE to watch/listen/participate, you would love it! It will be FUN")

I've watched a LOT of mind-numbingly retarded movies and shows, and listened to an awful lot of AWFUL music, just because I didn't want to be "rude" or "anti-social."

One day something in me snapped, and I stopped caring about seeming rude to people who projected their poor taste onto me. From that day forward, I can't even tell you how many times I've uttered the phrase "Oh, I'm sorry, no. I don't like FUN."

I did not initially intend to cut those things out of my life to get closer to God - but once I had removed myself from all that noise and distraction - there He was, waiting for me, hiding behind the many-layered answer to the question of: "seriously, what do you even DO with your free time?"

Well, if I can have it my way, I'll sit outside and stare at the trees and the sky and let my mind wander. Or go for a long walk. But I'd even rather sit and stare at a wall in complete silence for an hour and a half, than watch a movie. I'd rather scrub toilets. I'd rather shovel manure.

I don't want to do or consume mundane things that fill my attention span to full capacity. I want to do productive things that leave my internal faculties free for thinking, pondering, contemplating...

And then one day, I realized I was actually praying. And that God was obviously listening. He answered prayers I didn't realize I'd prayed. He gave me things I asked for that I did not think I could attain - not wrapped up in any illusion of personal worthiness or accomplishment, but heavily weighted with humility and contrition.

"It's all true. Of course it is. It has always been true. How much time have I wasted? What share of agony has Christ already suffered on my account?"

Don't wait until you have already found your faith to remove the influences from your life that would undermine your conversations with your Creator.
 

muscacav

Woodpecker
Trad Catholic
This article is a clear wake-up call to reevaluate these things that until now have probably gone unnoticed and taken for granted, to really scrutinize what entertainment we consume and analyze what, if any, benefit it really brings.
Excelent points. I'd add that nurturing this skill in ourselves is of paramount relevance. Teaching it to young ones is a good deed. I remember Mar Mari Emmanuel talking about not being completely spiritual all the time. I will post it if I find his preaching.
 

Stoyan

 
Banned
Orthodox
I don't consume the western secular content and it's derivations. Never have. No superheroes, no comics, video games, twitter, tocktick, rock, hiphop, funkopop, celebrities, stupid apps, or any of such junk. I think it's cringy and idiocratic. It's so hollow and shallow. It looks so surreal how people are just mindlessly following the content of the secular establishment.

I think that YouTube videos and self-help books can good and useful too though. If anything, they have helped me get my life more or less together, and helping me grow and develop myself on my spiritual journey. I don't think that the medium matters, it's the content that matters, the message that they want to give you. So you can use books, YouTube videos, podcasts, various kinds of articles.

In your article above, Roosh, you mentioned that you don't want to consume anything that isn't explicitly written by a Christian. I agree that we should stay away from content that is written by people who are fully embedded in the wokeist establishment, yes. However, while Christian or not Christian is a good generalization, I think that we need to examine individual authors and articles case by case. For example, there are some people who call themselves Christians, but they are not really Christians, they are hypocrites. And on the other hand there are people who are very much like true Christians, people of other religions who are spiritually siblings in Christ but don't know it. I have learned much from them. There is also content which isn't explicitly Christian, such as folk songs, but they are good for the soul. Intuition is a better decider in such matters than logic. I think that everyone can find what is best for him or her.

For a lot of us, completely cutting off all entertainment cold turkey may not really be feasible
I don't think that cutting off cold turkey is the best way to do it. Nothing in spiritual and moral development should ever be forced. Don't attempt to abuse yourself. Until you're not ready yet, such an approach could do more harm than good. If you try to hit a stone with your hand, you will just injure your hand. And if you try to strike a stone with an axe, you will break the axe.

My idea is to let yourself separate from the secular content organically. When you seek out spiritual development, you start thinking differently, and your moral values change, which in turn shifts the range of content which is acceptable to your soul. When your level of spiritual development rises, when your vibration rises, the secular content is no longer is sync with your vibration, so you don't want it. When you know you're ready, you can reject this secular content, and then you won't have any temptations to take it up again, because it doesn't resonate with your soul. Water seeks it's own level everytime. Water can also cut a stone better than any axe.

We work and make money to afford entertainment.
I don't know about that one. Who do you have to be in order to make and make money to afford entertainment? It means that you have some extra money, that you don't know where to put your money. The reason why people spend their money on entertainment, is that they have so much money that they don't know what to do with it. So that would be American upper middle class liberals, who have a lot of disposable income. The average person, if he makes a good amount of money, he always puts it to good use. I mean, paying off debts, buying a house, buying a car, buying clothes, tools, food, silverware, and other things that you need in order to ensure a comfortable life for yourself and your family. For the vast majority of us, we work and make money, not to afford entertainment, but just to afford the basic necessities in life. If we have any surplus money at any time, we can just pay off the mortgage in a shorter number of years, or just buy a surplus amount of food for storage like a prepper. You first take care of yourself and your family, make sure that you have some "airbags" to endure any economic crisis, only then do you dare to spend money on entertainment or anything else that is basically just throwaway money.
 

Luna Novem

Kingfisher
Woman
Catholic
I suppose I try to find a happy medium.

I gave up secular women's magazines loooong ago... more than two decades. For books, I only read wholesome content... stuff I would not be ashamed for my kids to pick up and read. I don't watch a lot of TV or movies, but what I do watch is at least mostly clean. R-rated sex scenes are a no-go for me. The only rated R movies I have watched recently are Green Street Hooligans (fistfight violence and swearing, no sex) and the movie about the woman who quit her job at the abortion clinic.

Music is the exception. I hear you, Roosh, with your reference to Red Hot Chili Peppers and Gen X. I'm late Gen X as well and I have always loved music of many genres. Again, I try to keep a happy medium... I listen to more Phil Collins than 2Pac... but I do still occasionally get in that rap mood. But again, I have limits. I don't listen to modern stuff. I have never even heard the song WAP, although I've heard about it online. Even though I love music, I also love silence and have a lot of issues with audio overstimulation, so in honesty, the time I spend listening to music in a normal week is probably 1-2 hours max (and that's including the wholesome stuff).
 

prisonplanet

Robin
Other Christian
I suppose I try to find a happy medium.

I gave up secular women's magazines loooong ago... more than two decades. For books, I only read wholesome content... stuff I would not be ashamed for my kids to pick up and read. I don't watch a lot of TV or movies, but what I do watch is at least mostly clean. R-rated sex scenes are a no-go for me. The only rated R movies I have watched recently are Green Street Hooligans (fistfight violence and swearing, no sex) and the movie about the woman who quit her job at the abortion clinic.

Music is the exception. I hear you, Roosh, with your reference to Red Hot Chili Peppers and Gen X. I'm late Gen X as well and I have always loved music of many genres. Again, I try to keep a happy medium... I listen to more Phil Collins than 2Pac... but I do still occasionally get in that rap mood. But again, I have limits. I don't listen to modern stuff. I have never even heard the song WAP, although I've heard about it online. Even though I love music, I also love silence and have a lot of issues with audio overstimulation, so in honesty, the time I spend listening to music in a normal week is probably 1-2 hours max (and that's including the wholesome stuff).

I have gotten to where I only listen to secular music when working out. I just can't yet get going without it, although I do sometimes try to cut it out when I'm good and warmed up.
 

Gimlet

Pelican
I too am Gen X and loved Red Hot Chili Peppers. I gave them up about 4 years ago when I drove a rental car with Sirius radio. I saw the album cover with great clarity when Give it Away came on displaying the graphic. The LP is called "Blood Sugar Sex Magik". I don't know how this did not bother me when it was released.
 

prisonplanet

Robin
Other Christian
Sometimes rather than a movie or television program, I have started putting "screensavers" on my TV like this one. I live on a noisy urban intersection so it's better background noise. And while I don't really "watch" it, I there's something about the peaceful visual distraction. Not exactly edifying, but seems to be a nice step step toward unplugging completely.

 

fortyfive

Kingfisher
Other Christian
Due to the quickly changing situation in the world, I'm watching multiple news sources daily, but after reading for more than an hour, I noticed that it makes me very exhausted. It feels like the morning after driving a car all night.
Modern secular content is somehow draining energy from people. I noticed the same effect on other people and kids.

The only exception is watching old movies and documentaries. I like that sentimental feeling when seeing how people lived before ww2 or in the 50s.
 

Huginn

Pigeon
Agnostic
Another excellent article. Giving up secular content will be very difficult for me I believe. Your point about "oldies" idiolizing women is spot on. Whenever I'm exposed to music in which the singer desperately yearns for the love of that one beautiful woman he can't stop thinking about, I can't help myself but cringe at this. Same goes with rappers worshipping money and expensive brands like it is their life's purpose to strive for consumerism.

Talking about consumerism and money, I'd really like to read an article from your christian perspective about the topic of making money like you have tackled the issues with "4 Reasons Why Lifting In Gyms Is A Bad Idea" and "Hugs Are Dangerous".
 

christie2

Woodpecker
Woman
Other Christian
Originally posted on RooshV.com

woman-music-occult-1024x683.jpg

At risk of reproaching fellow Christians, I am continually surprised by how much secular content they consume. From Facebook to TikTok, from Hollywood movies to pop music, I suspect the average Christian is bombarding his soul with several hours of secular content per week. Do they not know that this consumption may be separating them from God and weakening their faith?

When I first returned to God in the spring of 2019, I was wholly immersed in secular culture. I made several Twitter posts a day (usually about politics or the misbehavior of women), listened to popular music, watched movies, consumed all manner of YouTube videos, and read self-help books. I followed dozens of social media accounts, devoured the news, and placed myself in venues of the night to be bombarded with devil music for hours at a stretch. Secular content was normal to me, and I didn’t give my habits a second thought until the growing grace of God within me could not reconcile the spirit from where all this content came. It did not worship God explicitly nor implicitly, and so it was not of God, even if it did not mention a bad word about God. If Satan could package his efforts into a motto, it would be anything but God, which is exactly how we can sum up all secular content.

It is three years going and I’m still tapering myself off secular content—that’s how entwined it was into my life. Even today I use the news as a source of entertainment to relieve natural lulls in the work day and as a means of procrastinating from spiritual duties. I didn’t realize how attached I was to it until I began the weaning process, especially when it came to music.

male-street-headphones-1024x683.jpg


My Spotify account was loaded with custom playlists of modern music, from folk covers of pop songs to oldies rock. The first thing I’d do when getting in my car is load up a playlist to listen with pleasure, but I began to perceive in my soul that this was wrong, because while listening to these songs, I never once thought of God. I wish I could say that I deleted all my favorite music in one go, but it was a gradual process: first I quit the modern music, rationalizing that “oldies” was okay, but an examination of their woman-idolizing lyrics revealed that oldies wasn’t safe either.

As a Gen X’er, deleting my Red Hot Chili Peppers playlist was challenging indeed, but like any drug, once you abstain for a while, your brain adapts to a healthier new normal. Now, I’m exposed to modern music mainly through passing cars or when I’m shopping in a store, and what strikes me is how I ever considered such a modern cacophony of sounds to be pleasing to my ears. Even better, my concentration has improved, particularly during prayer and long church services. I don’t have snippets of words or tunes bombarding my mind like in the past.

Father Seraphim Rose had a word to say about Orthodox Christians who continue to consume secular content:



May I ask you why you consume the creations of non-Christians, of those who don’t live by Christ, of those who don’t glorify Him? Why do you subject your eyes and ears to content produced by those who—unless they repent—are at high risk of being condemned by God on the Day of Judgment? Why do you listen to music by artists who you know live degenerate, sordid lives, and whose work is helping millions of youth descend into hell? Why do you watch movies produced and directed by Jews who hate Lord Jesus Christ and view abortion as a sacrament? Why are you not concerned about what the secular content is doing to your mind over the long term, locking it in the realm of fantasy and superficiality, how it is leading you into the abyss in exchange for moments of distraction and sensual pleasure? I ask these questions not just to you but also myself, and I did not have a justifiable answer to them, so I began to force myself to sever this attachment.

I’ve since become highly averse to reading, watching, or listening to anything that is produced by someone who does not have a knowable or visible Christian faith. If I get weak and think such content will edify me, perhaps because the non-Christian is “intelligent,” I ask myself how intelligent are they really if they don’t worship their very own Creator in the Church that He built. Do I really need the “wisdom” of someone who is firmly attached to the material world?

hollywood-sign-california-1024x624.jpg


It’s a mistake to believe that Orthodox Christianity is merely a lifestyle add-on that has a slot in your life alongside many other lifestyles. Orthodoxy is the lifestyle. It was called “the way” by early Christians, and it is the only way. Anything that conflicts with it must be looked upon with disdain. Secular content has become so hostile to Christianity, so engineered to distract souls from Christ, that any attachment to it must be likened to a drug addiction. Not only will quitting help you psychologically with anxiety, distraction, and fantasizing, but it will help aid in the salvation of your soul.

To successfully quit secular content, you will have to find something to replace it with. I spend much time reading Orthodox books, but sometimes my ears want to be pleased. In that case, I harness Spotify not to listen to gay disco music but Orthodox hymns and Classical music, made by composers who were not shy about their faith in God. There are also innumerable Orthodox podcasts and YouTube channels, and I hope to never tire of watching bearded Orthodox elders share wisdom in various languages. There are also freely available audio versions of the Bible. Trust me when I say that you’ll find so much wholesome content that you will not have enough time for it all.

Currently, I consume approximately 30-60 minutes of internet news each day, usually from Roosh V Forum, where I know that I’m getting information from a mostly-Christian lens. I do this because, as someone who speaks in the public square, I want my opinions and pronouncements of modern culture to be informed and up-to-date, but even that may only be an excuse, a sign of my worldly attachment. Let the secular world pass away, for it will surely die, and let us focus all our energies on spiritual matters, to get ready for an eternity of the spiritual, where we can all live as one with Lord Jesus Christ.

Read Next: Why Does The Supermarket Play Pop Music?
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Thank you for the Bible link.
I was able to easily finish one Book and listen to 20 minutes of another Book.
The different voices used in narrating and the neat background sounds, including birdies, kept my interest just like a movie theatre movie. Reminded me of religion class when we were read to and then took turns reading.
Excellent choice of a audio Bible link, thanks again.
 

DanielH

Ostrich
Moderator
Orthodox
Thank you for the Bible link.
I was able to easily finish one Book and listen to 20 minutes of another Book.
The different voices used in narrating and the neat background sounds, including birdies, kept my interest just like a movie theatre movie. Reminded me of religion class when we were read to and then took turns reading.
Excellent choice of a audio Bible link, thanks again.
The “Youversion” bible app let's you listen to many different audio bibles (even in other languages), I like the DRC and KJV versions there but they don't have a NKJV audio version. It saves your spot too. They also have a website.
 
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