Why Does The Supermarket Play Pop Music?

Lamkins

Woodpecker
Woman
I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve asked to have the music turned down while eating out. I always assumed it was to make you eat faster thereby getting you out the door so the next group can come in and spend money. It’s certainly not about making your dining pleasant. And Walmart has begun blasting.....blasting!....pop in the parking lot. I suspect it’s all designed intentionally to increase frenetic anxiety so you spend more to escape it.

Years and years ago I was in a thrift store. It was crowded with a lot of families with kids. Pop music was blasting and really annoying me, so I was just standing there looking around wondering if everyone else was as affected by it. A Rolling Stones song came on. Within 10 seconds every kid and baby in the place was crying or fussing.

At least Hobby Lobby plays hymns, although I prefer no music.

I recently bought a greatest hits CD by Sade. It suddenly occurred to me this morning, 4 hours ago, it’s about nothing but sex. Every.single.song.
 
In reply to Sitting Bull: Years ago, when I drove taxi, I had a customer who was a guy in his mid 40's who embarked on a 10 minute ride downtown. He couldn't stand the fact that I didn't play the radio in the cab. He actually said that he was becoming so "uncomfortable with the silence" that if I didn't put the radio on that he'd have to get out of the cab right now. He was really agitated about it. So, I put it on for the remaining 7-8 minutes of the ride, and then to ensure the point was made I shut if off again as soon as I pulled the car up to let him off. I like riding in silence. I like to be alone with my own thoughts. Imagine a guy who gets so unnerved at the thought of not having music pumped into his ears that he is about ready to freak-out. I found out in later years that many of my friends have 'noticed' that I don't run the radio in the car; I guess they find it odd.
 
Do you know what I am enjoying most in some foreign countries?
The fact that I don't understand a single word in their language.
Interesting you say that. I'm an anglophone living in Quebec and although I can speak and understand French it is very easy for me to tune it out so it's just background noise. I actually prefer to be essentially alone and that is much easier to achieve in Quebec than elsewhere where I am conscious of everything others say. When I go to Ontario, for example, I get so tired of hearing the others talking their inane crap all the time that I can't wait to go home.
 

tpifip

Chicken
@Salinger Where I used to get groceries before moving they played depressing 80s breakup songs a lot (think Roxette "It Must Have Been Love", that kind of thing). I theorized it was to make people 40+ sad and buy more junk food lol.
I agree with you about " It must have been love " by Roxette but I did like " Crash boom bang " also by them as it describes my life .
I know I am sad before anyone else says it .
 

Jessie

Sparrow
Woman
Hobby Lobby is run by an unapologetic Christians family, which is why they are always under attack. In fact, Mardel Christian & Education (regional chain of about 40 stores) was founded in the 80s by a Hobby Lobby founder family member.
Yes, we used to live in OKC where they were founded. All of our friends worked for the Green family and loved their boss very much. It’s funny because many Hobby Lobby stores out there have Mardel and Chick fil a in the same shopping center.
 
I have a thread about this:


The love songs being played in public places are meant to feminize men by elevating their oxytocin and lowering their testosterone so that their intelligence will decrease.

The songs about dancing and partying are meant to encourage addictive behavior and vices such as caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, nicotine, drugs, anti-androgens, gambling, sex, and sexual perversions.

The same way with music and art — music especially since it’s so all-pervading in society; you go to supermarket and you get music. There’s a whole philosophy in back of why you get the kind of music you do in the supermarket; and you have to understand what this music is trying to do to you, what is back of it. There’s a whole philosophy to it.

You go into a supermarket and you’re subjected to music. You go out in the street and you’re subjected to the art — the buildings, the billboards, everything in the streets is the art of our times. And therefore since one has to be subjected to that, it’s better to be subjected to good, refined art than the barbarism which exists today.

Father Seraphim Rose spoke of barbarism but a fascinating fact is that there were no barbarians or dark ages in Europe or Asia.

Even the Vikings had refined folk music, art, and architecture and an empire that covered 3,400,000 km^2 of land.

The Vikings also had shield armored battleships equipped with catapults firing incendiary bombs such as fire pots filled with molten iron or oil, and fire stones coated in tar or oil, sun compasses for navigation, and adjustable sails for sail tacking.

The Viking Empire which was founded by Rurik, its 1st emperor, sent a fleet of battleships led by Erik the Red to conquer the island of Greenland, making it the 1st North American territory to fall under White control.

The Vikings introduced the following innovations to make their navy the most powerful in Europe at that time:

Tacking
- the ability to sail into a headwind by moving an adjustable triangular sail back and forth to catch the wind and push it back, generating a propulsive force that moves the ship.

Sun Compass - a compass where heading is determined by the position of the shadow cast by the sun on a wooden cylinder placed in the center of a dial with lines on its edges enabling navigators to determine the degree of inclination to north, south, east, and west.

Shield Armored Ship - a ship with the sides of its hulls covered in large metal discs that act as a shield from enemy projectiles.

The Viking Imperial Army was also equipped with armor piercing weapons, armored cavalry, catapults, incendiary bombs such as the fire jar, fire pot, and fire stone, and explosives such as the fire arrow.

The Amerindians that were defeated by the invading Viking Empire were the savages because they only possessed stone weapons that were made by hand while the Vikings mass produced their weapons in industrial facilities such as animal mill, watermill, and windmill factories, blast furnaces, and oil refineries, and they used telecommunications in the form of smoke signals to communicate with distant battalions of soldiers.

The Amerindians also had savage practices such as human sacrifice, cannibalism, and scalping.

Even in ancient times, the Vikings, like the other Europeans and Asians, already had vast and powerful industrial empires and were making groundbreaking discoveries, inventions and structures like farms, ranches, agricultural terraces, aquaculture centers, cisterns, apartment blocks, animal mill, watermill, and windmill factories, blast furnaces, oil refineries, roads, highways, cantilever bridges, drawbridges, suspension bridges, causeways, ocean going ships, telecommunications in the form of smoke signals, computers such as the abacus, and even artificial islands that were used as commercial and naval relay stations for ships, and all of this is proof of our superiority.

Although the period of the Dark Ages is used to refer to Europe and Asia because of the conquests of their empires that forcibly spread organized religion, such as the Kingdom of England, the French Empire, the Dutch Empire, the 1st German Reich, and the Viking Empire in Western Europe, the empires of Moravia, Bulgaria, Georgia and Russia in Eastern Europe and the empires of the Islamic Caliphate, India, China, Japan, Mongolia, Khmer, Tibet, and the Kingdom of Thailand in Asia, the real Dark Ages was occurring simultaneously among the Jews, Africans, Native Americans, and Mesoamericans.

While the empires of Europe and Asia were busy building infrastructures and industrializing, for example, according to the Domesday Industrial Almanac, the English already had 5,624 animal mill, watermill, and windmill factories by 1086, and historical records show this number to have increased to 15,000 by the 1300s, the people outside of Eurasia had no machinery for mass producing goods and not even draft animals, which were already used in Europe and Asia since 4000 BCE.

Aside from a lack of scientific and technological progress, the people outside of Eurasia had plenty of depraved superstitions like human sacrifice, cannibalism, scalping, and blood sucking.
 
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kel

Ostrich
I've seen these stories for years and it seems like fluff journo nonsense to me. Kids want to loiter, classical music (in lieu of "HEY, GET A FREE BIG GULP WITH 20 GALLON FILL UP" screaming at you over the PA) isn't turning them away. Everyone here was 16 with nowhere to go once: if you heard classical music would that motivate you to leave?

I remember an article about stores playing a high-pitched tone that adults couldn't hear but teens could, that seems more likely to work though all this stuff seems like fluff nonsense really.
 

TexasJenn

Pigeon
Woman
This thread makes me once again thankful for HEB in Texas. It's the coolest large grocery chain I've ever found anywhere in the world. Decent prices, great selection of local goods, reasonably satisfied workers - I've asked many directly, and they all say good things. Yes, the top executives are filthy rich, but not as out of proportion as others like Kroger, where I rarely go because the workers there are so obviously undervalued and disgruntled, prices are higher, quality is lower.

HEB has many relative virtues, including that they play pretty cool music for a grocery store. Recently I was tickled to hear this great 80s tune I forgot about and spent the next 2 weeks jamming out to it at home.
 

Hermetic Seal

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I mostly shop for groceries at Publix, a large, slightly upscale supermarket chain in the southeast US. They're sort of like the Chick-Fil-A of supermarkets here (though less overtly Christian.) Ever since I worked there as a cashier fifteen years ago, they've played the same kind of soundtrack: radio pop-rock hits from the 90s and early 2000s, with a little 80s mixed in. Lots of stuff like the Goo Goo Dolls, Matchbox 20, Alanis Morisette, and the sort of music that was popular in my idyllic childhood of the mid-late 90s.

It's not just Publix, many other stores I've gone into over the years have this same sort of soundtrack. I think it's very deliberate engineering to evoke subtle feelings of nostalgia and relaxation from the upbeat, prosperous days of the 1990s, which I guess will make you more prone to spending money on groceries. It does have somewhat of an effect of making grocery shopping feel, at least at times, like escaping from the depraved contemporary world, but it's really just an illusion.

When I was living in northern Japan a decade ago my town's supermarket played the same upbeat, vaguely militaristic fanfare on repeat, all day, every day. This seems like it should've been annoying, but it sort of added to the charm of the store and on the rare occasions I went there and didn't hear their theme music, something felt very wrong. It's odd how music can condition our environment, especially considering that such a thing never existed in human history until the dawn of recording technology about a century ago.

Thinking about this subject, if I had a store and felt determined to play music, I'd play relaxing classical symphonic music at low volume, or something similarly atmospheric like subtle post-rock. I get using music to create an understated ambiance in a restaurant, cafe, or bookstore, but usually music in public places is terrible pop music or EDM created to be danced to. As somebody with absolutely no interest in dancing I've always found this baffling, but it's really just a key to reducing inhibitions and encouraging you to surrender to your passions. Then you'll buy more stuff, drink more alcohol, hang around longer in hopes of securing sex. The agenda revolves around what gets money for the proprietors, not what's best for you.
 

Grow Bag

Woodpecker
My thoughts in recent years have been about the ubiquitous use of the vocoder in popular music by producers . What kept coming to mind was Neil Young's Trans album from 1982. Though vocoders had been used by many other musicians, Young was clearly into exploring futurist themes with tracks "Computer Age", "We R in Control" and "Sample and Hold". The whole vibe of the album is this melding of man and machine. That must've given our fellow white record executives ideas when Cher, who is sort of melded herself, recorded "Believe". From then on there's been a constant stream of bland, soulless, vocoded pop songs and I can't help but think that, like much of popular music, this is by design.

I bring this up because the only place I get to hear popular music is when kids pass by in the street or in supermarkets and that's where I noticed the trend. And here we are on the cusp of technocracy.
*The only live version I could find isn't high quality, but gives the flavour.
 
I've seen these stories for years and it seems like fluff journo nonsense to me. Kids want to loiter, classical music (in lieu of "HEY, GET A FREE BIG GULP WITH 20 GALLON FILL UP" screaming at you over the PA) isn't turning them away. Everyone here was 16 with nowhere to go once: if you heard classical music would that motivate you to leave?

I remember an article about stores playing a high-pitched tone that adults couldn't hear but teens could, that seems more likely to work though all this stuff seems like fluff nonsense really.
The high pitch noise works, the freq was close to the sound of mosquitoes. The one that I have on my phone drives my 12 yr old son bonkers.

How long would you listen to Opera when you were a teenager?
 

Roosh

Cardinal
This thread makes me once again thankful for HEB in Texas. It's the coolest large grocery chain I've ever found anywhere in the world. Decent prices, great selection of local goods, reasonably satisfied workers - I've asked many directly, and they all say good things. Yes, the top executives are filthy rich, but not as out of proportion as others like Kroger, where I rarely go because the workers there are so obviously undervalued and disgruntled, prices are higher, quality is lower.

HEB has many relative virtues, including that they play pretty cool music for a grocery store. Recently I was tickled to hear this great 80s tune I forgot about and spent the next 2 weeks jamming out to it at home.
I traveled across the entire country and HEB was my favorite too. :laugh:
 

ball dont lie

Kingfisher
Gold Member
Aldi does not play music at my location or in other cities I have visited.

You have to pay a quarter to get your cart and this causes people to return the cart to get their quarter back. So the parking lot isnt littered with carts, usually.

Aldi has very high quality products at good prices, but the selection is "poor". It has vegetables, meat, dairy and a few canned goods, but it does not have aisles of chips, cookies, junk, processed foods, etc. If you want an item, they may have 1 variety. For example, I like brats and sauerkraut. There is 1 type of brat, 1 type of sauerkraut. At other supermarkets there might be 10 kinds of both of those items.
 

Kuma

Chicken
Aldi does not play music at my location or in other cities I have visited.

You have to pay a quarter to get your cart and this causes people to return the cart to get their quarter back. So the parking lot isnt littered with carts, usually.

Aldi has very high quality products at good prices, but the selection is "poor". It has vegetables, meat, dairy and a few canned goods, but it does not have aisles of chips, cookies, junk, processed foods, etc. If you want an item, they may have 1 variety. For example, I like brats and sauerkraut. There is 1 type of brat, 1 type of sauerkraut. At other supermarkets there might be 10 kinds of both of those items.

I love Aldi. It's such an outlier in America. A European style supermarket selling authentic German and other European food at super-reasonable prices. Most of their food seems to follow European guidelines for which ingredients can and can't be in food, too. It shows you just how inflated the prices of many run of the mill US supermarkets are. They are cheaper than even Walmart on a lot of items. We actually use Aldi to supply our family bakery with butter, milk, eggs, cream, sausage, and other things. Their prices are lower than wholesale many times.
 
That's pretty crazy. It's also probably what drives a lot of people to live in a big city verses a quiet town, ranch/farm, or rural property.
I couldn't imagine how someone like that lives life. I am the complete opposite personally.

In my usually quiet street, I can hear when the neighbours are on the front lawn farewelling their visitors as clear as day. The brief juxtaposition is notable where normally I would rarely hear of the neighbours.
 
Aldi does not play music at my location or in other cities I have visited.

You have to pay a quarter to get your cart and this causes people to return the cart to get their quarter back. So the parking lot isnt littered with carts, usually.

Aldi has very high quality products at good prices, but the selection is "poor". It has vegetables, meat, dairy and a few canned goods, but it does not have aisles of chips, cookies, junk, processed foods, etc. If you want an item, they may have 1 variety. For example, I like brats and sauerkraut. There is 1 type of brat, 1 type of sauerkraut. At other supermarkets there might be 10 kinds of both of those items.
The one line of certain products that Aldi stock are arguably superior to the products offered by their competitors. Aldi also sold pork knuckle before any other supermarkets.
 
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