Why I Don’t Trust American Dentists

I don't know about fermented but what evidence do you have that they 'dropped dead' from it? Cod -fish-krill oil is one of the single most important supplements you can take and has been so in Europe for centuries. Funny the guy you link to is a raw milk advocate.. something mainstream health officials object to on the same grounds.

There are plenty of other advocates - that : healthy diet=healthy immune=healthy teeth

From what I can tell, there's no rock solid proof of them dropping dead from it, but fish oil/cod liver oil simply cannot be fermented. Basically they are consuming rancid gutter trash.
 

DeWoken

Robin
Weston Price, I believe, found that stone age tribes as long as they had proper nutrition, had healthy teeth.

Whenever I get into a debate with people about vegan diets for some reason this guy's name always slips my mind - it's so frustrating! The proof has been staring us in the face for decades.

Scarcely a day goes by without me thinking about the man I could've been had other people not been sabotaging my mental and physical health.

Yeah, same here. "Medical gulag" indeed.

Basically they are consuming rancid gutter trash.

The health people I follow say to eat whole, wild fish. Many fish oil supplements are bad, they say. I'll see if I can find the appropriate video.
 
From what I can tell, there's no rock solid proof of them dropping dead from it, but fish oil/cod liver oil simply cannot be fermented. Basically they are consuming rancid gutter trash.
OK, well to each is own :) I take cod liver oil, but not of the fermented kind. More likely, IMOP, that toxins from polluted oceans are more of an issue than fermentation.
 
I am no conspiracy theorist, but I have similar experience. I really cannot understand the need to do x-ray. The incidence of oral bone tumors is almost non-existent. Instead of x-ray, the dentist should be feeling you tongue and gums to exam for oral cancer. Cancer of the tongue is actually real, and if detected early, is life saving.

Like Roosh I fought "tooth" and nail not to get the x-ray but eventually I relented. Even though x-ray radiation is minimal, but if I remember it was 3 or 4 shots which is is 2x that of chest x-ray.

I think one reason they push for x-ray is that they can point to tiny specks on the film and justify reasons to drill for cavity. Also if you have dental insurance, forget it, all the sudden you have cavities everywhere. When I had no insurance, I had no cavity, once I got dental insurance, they'll find every excuse to do procedures and bill the insurance company.

My friend's brother was a new grad dentist years ago. He said he was pushed to generate certain amount of revenue every month. So they up-sell fillings, crowns, everything.

Overall I respect the ethics of medical community, but there are still unscrupulous players. But I think dental community is even worse. You have to be pretty pathologic to do heart surgery on someone who does not need it for multiple reasons, but for one it is just so high risk. Dentists on the other hand know that their procedures done unnecessarily do not endanger your life. Knowing that they don't have any fear of over treatment.

You just have to be lucky to find an older dentist who has his own practice and is not hard for money. I went to one years ago. He was chill, clean my teeth himself, no x-ray, no cavity. Unfortunately he retired 5 years later. I am pretty lucky now I can also get dental care overseas where they don't push for procedures.
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Pastor Steven Anderson has been silent for almost 2 months, but has a post about how his tooth extraction was worse than being tased by police, broke bones, stepping on a nail that went straight through his foot, and being shocked by 220v of alternating current.

Incidentally, the man has been banned from entering any English speaking country. He's not even allowed in Malawi or Botswana. Simply amazing. I guess medical tourism isn't even an option for him since he is a political criminal.

Imagine an alternate universe where the orthodox, who are also around 1-2% of the US population, had the same amount of power as the aliens.
 

jonottawa

Chicken
I had a bunch of fillings/cavities as a young adult. Then I didn't go to the dentist for over a dozen years. When I went back, they said I had a few small cavities, but that it wasn't essential that those cavities be filled. I think most of my tooth decay was due to sugar/sweets and I've pretty much eliminated that sort of thing from my diet.

Lately (for about the last month) I've been trying an experiment rinsing my mouth twice daily with Hydrogen Peroxide (the 3% solution that is generally sold in a brown bottle at drugstores.) I never knew that was a thing. I thought Hydrogen Peroxide (again, we're talking about the very much diluted 3% solution) would burn or sting if you ever poured it in your mouth. It doesn't. It feels like water, and then it slowly starts to foam. Listerine is more of a 'shock' to your mouth than the Peroxide solution is (at least in my anecdotal experience.)

At first I was very encouraged and thought I noticed quite a bit of whitening in my teeth. But I have some really ugly stains on the 4 teeth furthest back in my mouth (top right, top left, bottom right, bottom left) and so far those stains haven't budged. But I do recommend that if you are concerned about your oral health and want an inexpensive boost to that health that you try rinsing your mouth once or twice daily with 3% Hydrogen Peroxide.
 

Hannibal

Ostrich
Gold Member
I haven't gotten a single cavity since I started eating at least a pound of beef a day, it's been at least eight years.

When I grew up I had a very sugar heavy diet and my teeth were beyond horrible as a result.

There is a book about this but the name escapes me at the moment. Nutrition and degeneration or something.
 

Guriko

Kingfisher
Gold Member
I haven't gotten a single cavity since I started eating at least a pound of beef a day, it's been at least eight years.

When I grew up I had a very sugar heavy diet and my teeth were beyond horrible as a result.

There is a book about this but the name escapes me at the moment. Nutrition and degeneration or something.
Here you go.

Read the book, study the book, admire the pictures and recognise that modern medicine is treating a poisoned body with more poison.

'Let thy food be thy medicine!' - Hippocrates

He knew why.
 

HurricaneJP

Sparrow
I went to dentist a year ago and they said I had to have all 4 wisdom teeth removed because they looked infected but didn't have much pain.
The dentist didn't want to remove them and said I had to go to a dental surgeon but didn't when I saw how much it would cost.
 

HighTower

Robin
I have an infection under a tooth that had a previous root canal. My work coverage is pretty good so I made an appointment with my dentist for a referral. After I sent off for preapproval, my coverage would not cover a type of exray so I contacted my insurance and they determined the imagery is unnecessary.

Well the specialist receptionist explained they use this new technology for imagery and uses multiple xray images to make a 3-d image of the troubled area. Not wanting to have my head filled with radiation I request the work be done the way it was before the new type of imagery became available. Now I'm stuck with a problem as they refused to treat me without the new xray being used.

I dont want to sound like a kook but having a hygienist or receptionist, although cute, giving me sound medical advice seems like a bad idea if you ask me. if anyone has any advice or previous experiences please feel free to post or message me.
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
The fact that they are having a non-doctor push medical procedures on you should tell you its just a sales gimmick, like the rust-proof undercoating the salesman pushes on a new car. Of course, if your car really *needed* that then the expert (the manufacturer) would apply it when they built the thing. Go somewhere else that knows how to practice actual dentistry.

Even if I had a perfect photograph of what your cavity or infection looked like, that doesn't help me do the procedure any better. I would still have to use my eyes looking at your mouth and determining when I had removed every bit of the infection and I'm no longer seeing it in your mouth.
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
The fact that they are having a non-doctor push medical procedures on you should tell you its just a sales gimmick, like the rust-proof undercoating the salesman pushes on a new car. Of course, if your car really *needed* that then the expert (the manufacturer) would apply it when they built the thing. Go somewhere else that knows how to practice actual dentistry.

Even if I had a perfect photograph of what your cavity or infection looked like, that doesn't help me do the procedure any better. I would still have to use my eyes looking at your mouth and determining when I had removed every bit of the infection and I'm no longer seeing it in your mouth.
Hi everyone- I’m a dentist (I suppose you have no reason to believe me but I hope you do).

The imaging they are requesting is probably a cone beam CT, in order to obdurate the canal right to the apex. Poor obduration results in endodontic failure, which is what HighTower is experiencing right now, so imaging is crucial for the procedure and probably what was lacking the first time.

Surely you realize the statement “Even if I had a perfect photograph of what your cavity or infection looked like, that doesn’t help me do the procedure any better” is blatantly wrong. The success or failure of any surgery depends upon the quality of the imaging. If you were going in for a ligament repair on your arm or a surgical debridement of the bone, let’s say in osteomyelitis, wouldn’t you want the surgeon to be prepared? Wouldn’t you want the best model, the best pictures, and the most concise treatment plan possible so the surgeon knows what to do ahead of time? Or do you prefer they open you up and say “well, let’s see what’s going on”? Endo is a surgery- it’s accessing the center of a tooth which has a direct communication with the alveolar bone of your jaw. Sure, it’s not as serious as a torn ligament, but try letting it sit for a few months and then get back to me and let me know how serious it feels.

The receptionist/hygienist is correct that it’s (relatively) new, but by no means experimental. You also might be comforted by the fact that the amounts of radiation required for a good image these days are much lower than the “regular” x-rays we all used to get as a kid.
 

HighTower

Robin
Thanks for your posts guys and the detailed responses. This past few days have been pain and major discomfort. Realizing I have to crap or get off the pot I made an appointment with the specialist. The tooth has about 2 grand in it and I want to save it if possible.

Stirfry I would "like" your post and will come back once I get the privilege.

HT
 

Max Roscoe

Pelican
Orthodox Inquirer
Wouldn’t you want the best model, the best pictures, and the most concise treatment plan possible so the surgeon knows what to do ahead of time? Or do you prefer they open you up and say “well, let’s see what’s going on”?
Actually, that's exactly what a surgeon told me about a torn ACL. He wanted to perform an MRI and I asked if that was necessary and he said, well, I can also see the extent of damage once I cut open your knee. Regardless of the extent I will repair it to the degree needed. (I did not have the surgery and recovered through therapy and exercise).

The point is even if you have a picture of exactly how the damaged tooth or body part looks, the surgeon / dentist still must use his own eyes to determine that the defect has been corrected / physically removed, which is a continuous process. Knowing what it looks like before the surgery gives an idea of what he must do, but in the end it's a lot of checking, cutting, checking again, cutting, etc. until all the bad material is removed. Knowing what the starting point is, by obtaining an image of the "before" status, is helpful, but not necessary or without cost.

If a doctor was up front with me about the risks and drawbacks, and admitted it was optional for the procedure, I would be much more inclined to consider letting him take an x-ray, but pretending there's no negative, or acting like it is a requirement is a huge turn off.
 

R.G.Camara

Kingfisher
I was lucky as a child, I had a European-born dentist who came to America as an adult--still had the thick accent. He never scared my parents with horror stories about how we needed tons of cavity fillings or braces. I never had a cavity, and my sister had a few, but neither of us had braces. My parents saved money and I never feared going, and my teeth are fine to this day.
 
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