Why I Don’t Trust American Dentists

MBell

Sparrow
Woman
I totally agree with the consensus and it supports my personal experiences, which I wanted to share because they seem so similar. I never had a single cavity in my entire life and I decided to go to a new dentist after my family dentist retired. People recommended one dentist and I made the mistake of going to him. He did a lot of xrays and then they proceeded to tell me that my gums were at risk of receding in places. I was pressured to have a cavity filled right then so I wouldn't need a root canal. I had the filling done but I have since refused to go back for additional recommended procedures. The filling has caused me pain and I can hardly floss in the area. They filed it down but remaining issues make me wish I didn't get a filling for my first supposed cavity which I never even felt. Others have discounted my story but I am happy to stay away from unnecessary treatment that causes problems and just take care of my teeth with a strong hygiene routine.
 

SoCal9705

Chicken
I have not been to a dentist in several years for the same reason. They always want to x-ray x-ray x-ray. I used to resist but they push and push - the ADA recommends blah blah. And the liability scam. I brush twice per day (lightly), floss every night and then do a full dental cleaning myself. I have tools like a dentists and go in between each tooth every night removing any plaque building up and also scrape the surfaces. Upshot is you wake up with a still fresh mouth and nothing bad is going to happen in between your teeth. I highly recommend the practice although it does take a few minutes every night.
 

Virginiahousewife

Pigeon
Woman
I too have had similar experiences at the dentist, unfortunately. Having been health conscious for most of my adulthood, for the past several years I also ascribe to the Weston A Price school of thought. My daughter is 18 months and I consider our diet as responsible for her having beautiful teeth, wide palette, no crowding, and even pretty straight too! She had no sugar other than fruit in her first 14 or so months. Has been given cod liver oil almost daily. We drink raw milk only which I pick up weekly from a local farm for $10 a gallon. I often make rich chicken and beef bone broths in my crock pot that cook for a few days (to maximize release of nutrients from the bones) which we drink like tea and use in recipes. I have one cooking now with bones from a calf that died on a family members property last week after being struck by a fallen branch.

Baby eats what we eat including organ meats as pate, and lots of eggs, meat and full fat yogurt. Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon is a must read for this way of life.

We brush only once a day and pay good attention to the tongue. Once weekly or so I rinse fully and gargle with hydrogen peroxide, I feel like more often is too stripping. It’s also good for sanitizing your toothbrush. I floss probably only a couple times a week, whenever I feel like I need it. This routine has kept me cavity free for 10 years (knock on wood) and actually minimizes plaque, which I used to get a lot. I did notice my teeth aren’t as white now that I only drink distilled water, but they are still white.

I’ve used charcoal powder and baking soda, they’re ok, but I don’t think needed. I have used (((Dr. Bronners))) toothpaste for a few years now. Sea Fresh was my previous go to. I actually really like the (((Dr. Bronners))) brand of crazy spaceship products, he has I believe passed on and they have a good reputation for being high quality organic products. I consider their Castile soap to be the one product I cannot live with out. It does everything and is a great value when you consider their motto ‘dilute, dilute, dilute!’. Seriously, I have used the same gallon jug I got for almost 3 years now, and it still has a little bit left. I pour it into other glass containers and keep by every sink in my home and use it for cleaning, mopping, washing my dog, hand washing items like swimsuits etc. Hopefully this info is helpful. Wishing you all good health in Christ.
 
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Virginiahousewife

Pigeon
Woman
Wanted to add that breastfeeding is also essential for early life health and the formation of ones palate. Breast feeding is the biological norm and super imperative to the foundation of good health and gut micro biome. Many people with poor oral health (or poor health in general) were not breast fed long term.

Unsurprisingly, in the US the support for newly postpartum mothers is horrendous and almost insures failure at successful breastfeeding.

In my experience the pressure to feed ‘correctly’ and on a specific schedule is intense from the get go in hospitals. Every single nurse and lactation consultant will have different and contradictory advice, often being hyper critical and negative. They also police against things like contact napping and bed sharing which fosters closeness and opportunity for learning comfortable feeding. Then when your newborn cries (as can be expected when one realizes it is no longer in the womb, but instead in an cold sterile hospital) the nurses pounce, guilt tripping the vulnerable new mother that the baby is probably hungry and you ‘aren’t producing enough’. Never mind the fact that the newborn stomach is the size of a pea and the firstly produced milk colostrum is super rich and condensed for this reason. They then sabotage the desperate new mom by offering to supplement for the baby with formula. Giving the insecure mom a break and the relief knowing that their child is being fed. After baby has been introduced to formula, a successful breastfeeding relationship is even less likely. Further squashing a mother’s confidence in her own ability to provide for this most important need.

But that’s fine. The baby can only breast feed for a few weeks anyway. Mommy needs to get back to the office, right?
 

BlastbeatCasanova

Kingfisher
Been brushing my teeth with baking soda for the last two years and haven’t had any dental problems to speak of.

Funnily enough, when I was using (((fluoride))) toothpaste I was experiencing all sorts of issues, and was talked into a root canal by my overzealous dentist. I think I have a filling now but I’m honestly not too sure what they did under the hood.

Suffice to say, after reading Roosh’s report, I’ll be skipping my annual dentist visit in the states. Only when an issue arises will I seek their council, and even so, I’ll be wary of their “fee for service” sham pushing model. Sounds like Europe is better for this type of thing.
Still going strong with the baking soda? Any techniques that you like? I’ve been using it for the last two weeks, I like the feeling of cleanliness afterwards. I know some people say it’s rough on your teeth but I remember seeing a chart (maybe from Roosh or somewhere else in the forum) that the abrasiveness of BS wasn’t enough to damage your teeth.

Also what’s the consensus here on flossing? I used to think it was a scam to sell floss but it seems like it does clean well between the teeth themselves and the gum part. I floss mostly every night despite one section of gum between two teeth bleeding profusely everytime
 

Talus

Sparrow
Also what’s the consensus here on flossing? I used to think it was a scam to sell floss but it seems like it does clean well between the teeth themselves and the gum part. I floss mostly every night despite one section of gum between two teeth bleeding profusely everytime
I use to feel the same way, that flossing was over rated and not as important as the industry makes it out to be. But I've come to find that flossing a couple times a week into the gum lines, making sure to round your floss on each tooth and scrape, does help to keep tooth plaque from building up.

Also, my most recent visit to the dentist office seems to mirror a lot of people's experiences in this thread. When the dentist came in to examine me after my prophylaxis he seemed more intent on selling me procedures to fix "cavities," than to actually discuss proactive and preventitive measures for my dental health. I left the office with the same opinion that most of you have come too, that a dentist is just like any other business, they have to sell a product/service to make their money.
 

Uzisuicide

Woodpecker
Gold Member
My dental insurance covers 50% of crowns. The uninsured get 50% off a crown procedure. So the out of pocket expense for a crown is the same for those with insurance and those without insurance.
 
I've heard via "internet experts" vitamin k2 can reverse dental disease. I don't know if it does but I'm convinced we all don't get enough k2 so I supplement it anyway. K2 is that vitamin you never hear about.
 

kel

Ostrich
Also what’s the consensus here on flossing? I used to think it was a scam to sell floss but it seems like it does clean well between the teeth themselves and the gum part. I floss mostly every night despite one section of gum between two teeth bleeding profusely everytime
If nothing else flossing is the best thing you can do for your breath. I floss probably to an extreme, but I've kissed too many girls who were lovely and beautiful and fun and.... ugh, stale mouth to kiss. I really think it's because they didn't floss (and ate diets high in the carbs microbes prefer).

I saw an interview with Liv Tyler once who said her dad got her to floss by saying "just try flossing once, then smell the floss - that's why you floss".

I have sensitive gums like you, though. And I have receding gums, have for years, probably because I brush too hard.
 

Aizen

Kingfisher
Still going strong with the baking soda? Any techniques that you like? I’ve been using it for the last two weeks, I like the feeling of cleanliness afterwards. I know some people say it’s rough on your teeth but I remember seeing a chart (maybe from Roosh or somewhere else in the forum) that the abrasiveness of BS wasn’t enough to damage your teeth.

Also what’s the consensus here on flossing? I used to think it was a scam to sell floss but it seems like it does clean well between the teeth themselves and the gum part. I floss mostly every night despite one section of gum between two teeth bleeding profusely everytime
Been going strong. It's been over a year since I switched and my teeth feel as strong as ever. Basically just wet my brush and then dip it in a box of baking soda. It's great for swirling at the end too, given the antibacterial properties of BS.

I also use it as deodorant. Same deal - wet two fingers, dip them in a box of baking soda, and apply to my pits.

The final use is as laundry detergent. I just dump in a nice sized mound, and it cleans my clothes well. This one is important, since most commercial detergents are chockful of T-lowering chemicals.

Bottom line: Baking soda has been a great toothpaste replacement, and I will continue using it into the far future.
 

BlastbeatCasanova

Kingfisher
@JiggyLordJr thats awesome to hear. I’ve been using it as DO for a while now and it’s great for that. Didn’t know about using it as detergent, that’s good to know. BS is so dang cheap it’s awesome. One thing since you mentioned dipping a wet brush in a box, I found that when I did that over time moisture would seep in and make some of BS harden and become unusable. Now I put the BS in an old vitamin bottle and pour a decent mound in the cap for whenever I brush, rinse my mouth with whatever the leftover and rinse the cap out. Maybe you don’t have this problem but figured I’d throw that out there
 

kel

Ostrich
Baking soda is also good as a shampoo substitute. Put a little water into baking soda so it makes a paste, massage it into your hair and down to the scalp. Rinse with warm water to physically remove what you can, then rinse with a few tbs of apple cider vinegar diluted with warm water. I've been doing that for years. I do that once a week and otherwise just rinse my hair with water once a week or so. No need to overly clean your hair, leave your natural oils (within reason).
 

fokm

Woodpecker
Gold Member
I had a dentist appointment today. Routine cleaning.

I had something happen to me recently which put me in a bad mood. During XRays I have a bit of a gag reflex and simply did not feel like going through that today. I was not in the mood.

The dental assistant said that I was going to have an XRay done. I replied, "I do not want to get an XRay today. I have a gag reflex and just don't want to do it today."

Her response was that she would have to confer with the dentist.

She came back a minute later and told me the dentist said that since I have had "work done", I needed to get the XRay.

I said, "I do not consent to an XRay. I either get my teeth cleaned without one or I am leaving."

"Sir, we need to take an XRay."

I picked up my things and left.

I really thought the patient was the one who decided things.
 

Kelly

Chicken
Woman
A few years ago I had to have my wisdom teeth removed and they took an x-ray. I am glad they did because one of my teeth were close to the nerve and it would have damage the feeling my mouth if they had not put me under. I wonder if they would do the same in Europe.
 

Stirfry

Woodpecker
I really thought the patient was the one who decided things.
Really? Since when? You give consent on what’s to be done, you don’t “decide things” like what treatments to receive and which ones to refuse (unless they are elective procedures). Dentistry is a science. It’s healthcare- you’re not at a restaurant ordering a few things here or there a la carte.
 

fokm

Woodpecker
Gold Member
Really? Since when? You give consent on what’s to be done, you don’t “decide things” like what treatments to receive and which ones to refuse (unless they are elective procedures). Dentistry is a science. It’s healthcare- you’re not at a restaurant ordering a few things here or there a la carte.
Calm down, hoss. I went in for a routine cleaning. I didn't go in for spinal surgery.

I did some research on this and surprisingly there are very few Americans who seem to object to having XRays taken. For me, it was literally that I was not in the mood to gag today. I very likely would have consented to having XRays in 6 months.

I don't want to link to this site, but doing a Web search on this reveals lots of dentists who are asking how they can overcome objections of patients who don't want XRays and I found this--and there are other sites that say nearly the same exact thing (like they are NPCs, and the emphasis below is NOT mine):

Should You Treat A Patient Who Won’t Accept Radiographs?
Although this may seem drastic to some, from a legal standpoint this may be the best policy. Even if a patient has signed a form stating refusal of x-rays as a personal preference and understands that the dentist cannot treat him/her properly; no patient can legally give consent for a dentist to be negligent. The dentist is liable for improper diagnosis and treatment, even with a “refused x-ray consent form.” A patient can always refuse any treatment or procedure; however, the dentist may also decline to treat that patient. If this happens, elaborate documentation in the patient’s record is recommended. A dismissal letter should also be sent to the patient with wording emphasizing failure to treat some dental conditions may result in “permanent, irreversible damage to your dental health.” Offering appropriate care for patients is a basic function of a dental practice, and dental x-rays are a necessary requirement for accomplishing this.
Do you understand the argument this is making? If you, as a reasonable human being, think that once-a-year during cleaning is too much XRay exposure (something other dentists *do* say), then you are giving your consent for a dentist to be negligent which you cannot legally do. On top of that, the person at the above site is recommending sternly worded letters to make the patient feel terrible about their decision.

My body my choice just isn't true 100% of the time, it seems.

We can force a baker to bake a gay cake, but don't have the right to *get a cleaning* without an XRay.

I'm starting to think basic dentistry is another sham in our culture.
 

messaggera

Woodpecker
Woman
This should be interesting if followed by other state dental associations:

Dentists can increase patients' confidence about the COVID-19 vaccines [association link]

Quick Summary:
CDA added nine resources to the COVID-19 Vaccine Information Toolkit to promote vaccine education and awareness in the dental office and facilitate dentists’ conversations with patients. The resources include a discussion guide, patient email template, posters in English and Spanish, and more.

Dentists can boost patients’ confidence in vaccine, influence vaccination decision-making
The public is more likely to trust information they receive about the COVID-19 vaccine when that information comes from public health entities or health care professionals. In fact, a recommendation from a health care provider is one of the strongest determinants of vaccine acceptance, recent research shows.

The new CDA resource also provides specific communication strategies dentists can adopt in the office to promote vaccine acceptance among their patients, such as showing empathy and providing facts to counter vaccine misinformation.

The newest resources are:
......the article goes on...
 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
My dental insurance covers 50% of crowns. The uninsured get 50% off a crown procedure. So the out of pocket expense for a crown is the same for those with insurance and those without insurance.
Please search Dr. Huggins regarding, crowns, root canals, etc before you decide.


 

Vigilant

Woodpecker
Woman
Still going strong with the baking soda? Any techniques that you like? I’ve been using it for the last two weeks, I like the feeling of cleanliness afterwards. I know some people say it’s rough on your teeth but I remember seeing a chart (maybe from Roosh or somewhere else in the forum) that the abrasiveness of BS wasn’t enough to damage your teeth.

Also what’s the consensus here on flossing? I used to think it was a scam to sell floss but it seems like it does clean well between the teeth themselves and the gum part. I floss mostly every night despite one section of gum between two teeth bleeding profusely everytime
Essential to floss twice daily, preferably after every meal. Unless there's a better product, I recommend oral b, satin floss, as it is more gentle.
 
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