Working on losing 100 pounds (at least). Tips to stay motivated?

RDF

Woodpecker
What should I do for exercise other than walking a mile or two a day? I usually burned most of my pounds off by swimming, and I'm not too versed in body weight exercise.

As a few others have mentioned, simplicity is key when starting out.

For body weight exercises, stick with push-ups, dips, pull ups (if you can do them), and a little bit of basic ab work (ie: crunches). Over time, throw in some leg work (lunges/squats), diamond push ups, other ab exercises, etc.

For cardio, starting out with a 1-2 mile walk is great. Eventually, make that a 1-2 mile power walk, or a 2-3 mile walk. Maybe jog it out a little. I go for 10,000 steps/day, bit of a cheesy goal but that's a baseline of ~4-5 miles walked per day. With gyms closed, I've also been doing a ton of HIIT workouts like boxing/sprints, something to explore when you feel that walking isn't doing it as much anymore.

One thing I strongly recommend is to track your progress in your workouts. If you are consistent with them, you WILL see improvements (ie: you used to do 20 pushups, now you do 30, etc). Those improvements will motivate you to work harder, at least they do for me. It's a positive feedback loop that can be very powerful.
 

Jack Bauer

Sparrow
Have you decided that you're sick of being overweight and you simply refuse to be overweight anymore? If not, this effort will fail.

For this to succeed, you won't be losing weight. You'll be losing bad habits and replacing them with good habits.
 

Josue

Chicken
Lots of solid advice in this thread, i will try to add a little:
-The only motivation i can give you is that you will only live once bro, then why don't you give the best of yourself and make of this one the best life possible?

-About how to do it: the thing that worked for me was weightlifting and to keep myself in a caloric deficit, i would eat between 1000-1500 calories a day (this is doesn't mean starving, just cutting out junk food and keeping control of what you put in your mouth) ,i lost 20kg in 3 months with this method, but of course you have to choose whatever suits you best.

-The last tip i can give you is that whenever you feel the need of eating some junk, keep this in mind: food will always be there, ALWAYS, it doesn't matter if you eat it tomorrow, the next month or 27 years in the future, it's not like a friend or a family member, you won't miss the time you don't eat it.
i don't know if i was clear there so i will give you an example: when i was trying to lose weight in my teenager years, my parents used to buy pizza on saturday nights, here in my country you can buy pizza by meter, so they would buy 2 meters of pizza every damnit saturday night.
the first times i would give up and eat, but then i realize that if i don't eat pizza in that saturday night, i will always have the opportunity to do it the next one.
if the urge is strong, like you're dying if you don't eat that shit, just fill your stomach with low-calorie food, like olives for example, the urges are usually gone when the stomach is filled

Good luck bro, Give your best.
 

stugatz

Pelican
Here's a pic from no gi takedown day earlier in November. I'm on the left.


Not really just BJJ, it's really nice to have the IBJFF weight class list to look at, but it's gonna be a while before California allows BJJ tournaments again. It's basically the last tier of things to open up next to concerts. So... fuck.

But yea, I don't mind, it gives me a good goal and this stuff takes time anyway.

I haven't been under 170 pounds since I was 18-19. It's just really enjoyable to be back in that range and see what else I can still do as a 34 year old. I never got to break the 6:00 mile and it's been a decade plus since I dunked a basketball.

I just want to see what I look like at the target weight. I've never had a 6 pack before. 4 pack at best.

So yea, this will be fun.
What got you into BJJ in particular? I've always wanted to learn a martial art (I played too much Tekken growing up maybe?) but could never decide on one because they all seem to have their strengths and weaknesses.

When I'm a little thinner and have the cash, I'm looking for one that's both useful and widespread. I also don't want to get overly injured in training, though. (So I've always been particularly interested in boxing or mixed martial arts, but may end up taking judo as I assume taking punches to the head has negative consequences at some point. I know boxing gloves don't soften a punch any.)
 

stugatz

Pelican
Have you decided that you're sick of being overweight and you simply refuse to be overweight anymore? If not, this effort will fail.

For this to succeed, you won't be losing weight. You'll be losing bad habits and replacing them with good habits.
Every time I got motivated in the past, I had those exact feelings, but I remember what it felt like when I'd finally lost most of the weight - I went from being invisible to just being an average guy. Granted, at 5'8 and 200 pounds, that's exactly what I was...average. I never got to my ideal weight or in great shape. I now know this in retrospect and think I expected far too much too soon when I'd lost a whopping 90-odd pounds.

I want to finally do that, but I think I'm just afraid of being disappointed at the end of all of this. (As in, will being thin result in just a new list of problems for me?) Which means I'm prioritizing the wrong things and should likely look into speaking to a professional. I had a rough childhood that led to chronic self-esteem problems as an adult.
 

Jack Bauer

Sparrow
-The last tip i can give you is that whenever you feel the need of eating some junk, keep this in mind: food will always be there, ALWAYS, it doesn't matter if you eat it tomorrow, the next month or 27 years in the future, it's not like a friend or a family member, you won't miss the time you don't eat it.
Food will always be there, but junk food shouldn't always be within reach. This is easier for people who live alone, but anyone trying to lose weight should try not to have junk food at home. You'll eat a lot more junk food if you only have to walk to the kitchen rather than walk or drive to the store when you get the urge for cookies or chips.

I want to finally do that, but I think I'm just afraid of being disappointed at the end of all of this. (As in, will being thin result in just a new list of problems for me?) Which means I'm prioritizing the wrong things and should likely look into speaking to a professional. I had a rough childhood that led to chronic self-esteem problems as an adult.
If you have visions of losing weight and then having bikini models chasing you, sure, you'll be disappointed. But if you combine weight loss with the gym, you won't just change your appearance but over time you'll also change your outlook, gain confidence, etc. You still won't have bikini models chasing you, but there's no way that "being thin will result in just a new list of problems" for you. There are no negatives to losing weight and keeping it off. None.
 

tigerbass

Pigeon
What got you into BJJ in particular? I've always wanted to learn a martial art (I played too much Tekken growing up maybe?) but could never decide on one because they all seem to have their strengths and weaknesses.

When I'm a little thinner and have the cash, I'm looking for one that's both useful and widespread. I also don't want to get overly injured in training, though. (So I've always been particularly interested in boxing or mixed martial arts, but may end up taking judo as I assume taking punches to the head has negative consequences at some point. I know boxing gloves don't soften a punch any.)

BJJ? Didn't really plan to do martial arts at all in life. I'm a big guy, most people do not want to throw hands with someone taller than them. I was going to coast on that for a few more decades alongside some nice guns.

Both a few things happened and I got dedicated real quick.

First, I've always loved guns since I discovered the Zombie Survival Guide at 25. I thought it was a joke. Read it, it wasn't.

Key takeaways were:
1) zombies are stupid, if real, this is a risk that can be significantly managed. They are stupid and predictable.
2) Humans, highly intelligent, irrational and unpredictable.

I started getting more pro-gun when I was 21. Not easy to do in Commie California. I started investing in silver at 21. Later graduated to gold and fancier trading instruments on metals. Learned about the corrupt Fed and immense monetary history thanks to Michael Maloney's free Youtube videos. Who knew the gold community was just as obsessed about guns, particularly 1911's and 30 cals. :D Sign my ass up!

I learned of Jocko Willick. His video on the idea self-defense/martial arts progression blew my mind: (8 min) — Essentially, guns > jiu jitsu > boxing > muay thai > wrestling > Finishing School of sticks/knives/judo.
And like any normal guy, I have NO IDEA how to fight properly on the ground aside from deploying ground and pound. Avoiding the ground at all costs was my Plan A lol.

In 2017, I was attempting to go see Milo at Berkeley do his Free Speech rally. Unsuccessful. Nearly died. Antifa took over, started looking for attendees to dismantle. Was backed into corners next to Proud Boys. We did not all fight our way out or run. My friend and I made it, but checking reports later, apparently no one died. Antifa were masked, had random protective gear from sports equipment to junk, but they also had lots of sticks/clubs/bats. Not a fair fight at all. I took the Bart train there and was unarmed. Fucking pussies. Should've brought my .380 at least. Maybe better I didn't...I really don't know. I've never seen a mob assembled in front of me ready to kill me. It..wakes you up. I fucking grew up in the Bay, interned at UC Berkeley through high school, been here countless times... and the city and Soros goons are trying to kill me. Yea, I'm a simple man, I draw the line at murder.

NEXT FUCKING DAY, my friend and I are in jiu jitsu class in SF near Chinatown at Professor Rumulo's. We did not negotiate it. We were happy to be alive and did not want to be caught empty-handed like that. Now we're essentially, most of my crew are blue belts and we're pretty happily choking people.

Conor was huge around that time too, seeing Nate Diaz choke the crap out of that left-handed sniper was very eye opening. I had taken a jiu jitsu intro class before.. *sigh* It was Dave Camarillo's school in Pleasanton. I worked a block away for 3 years. He's legendarily feared in jiu jitsu tournaments for his judo prowess. In judo circles, even the best newaza players fear his jiu jitsu. A local NorCal California legend. I went with my cousin to that intro and we liked it, but we thought it looked really gay. This was the same reason I never considered wrestling an option in high school. I did not understand unfortunately.

But yea, I absolutely wished I started sooner. My future kids will absolutely start with BJJ or at least judo. I crossed judo every now and then at the Stanford Judo Club, our dojo had a bunch of guys going to both locations, super cool. Fucking brutal on your body though if you don't know breakfall/gynmastic skills. I still suck at some of it, but it's better than when I started. Cartwheel passes are hella hard for me.

I'm not opposed to going judo > bjj in hindsight. You'll be more well-rounded. The beginning will be far more taxing physically. One of the best descriptions I saw of someone new to judo was, "I've been busy falling for two hours!!" Yup. Mateee... all the way into the ground lol. Judo is cheaper for tournaments and monthly dues. It's older, big throws are hella cool and OP. One problem with Judo is it got taken over by the OIC and been watered down A LOT for the Olympics and international competition. Like, you're not allowed to grab legs for a takedown. So no single/double leg takedowns whatsoever in tournaments. That's absolutely not realistic and definitely not a solid MMA base if you wanna be a fighter. But judoka guys share that fierce aggressive mindset with wrestlers when it comes to sparring and they always go for the kill. Brazillian jiu jitsu is far more chill and doesn't rely on explosive athleticism like wrestling or judo. Intellectually, that makes it a more superior martial art if you can train longer and stay competitive. It's more on technique focused for leverage and maximum output and efficiency rather than explosive twitch 1 muscle fibers to win. But you'd be a fool to think you don't have to bring your A game against wrestlers or judoka.

My long-term plans are to master all the facets that Jocko articulated. I'll be a black belt in Brazillian jiu jitsu and Judo. But even older than both of those, is Japanese Jiu Jitsu, the true patriarch of Japanese grappling. It has preserved the battlefield nuances that judo and the brazillians never worry about like, hey, you can do an arm bar, but you can also draw your dagger and sever your opponent's Brachial artery. AND THEY PRACTICE arm bars in that way. You have to keep this hand free to defend against a knife draw... here's how you do your own knife draw...it's legit samurai close quarters protocol. It's so old school and savage. That's one of the reasons which made armored knights and armored samurai so hard to fight. You don't punch an armored warrior effectively. It just doesn't work. There's no chin to attack and most of the body is covered. But if you unmount this armored warrior off his horse...if you can throw them in a way they won't get back up.. if you can snap limbs... if you can employ finger locks (aikido has the best finger locks..and not much else..)... hey, things get interesting. And if you lost your broadsword or katana, what are you going to do? Here comes the Japanese jiu jitsu training. :)

But yea, it's a super workout. You're basically training in heavy ass industrial pajamas. There is NOTHING like fighting for your life when grappling. Not even boxing comes close. It's a full body exertion like no other. Having sparring cardio is just.. magical. Hard to explain unless you also grapple. Endless 5 minute rounds of sparring or just takedown drills is far worse than all the suicides from basketball, burpees or explosive clean & jerk lifts..nah, shuttle runs, nah, nothing compares to sparring and takedown drills. That stuff depletes you in a good way.

And as the UFC has taught us, wrestling is a godly base skill to have. So yea, real fighters don't skip takedown day. ;)
 
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Alpone

Woodpecker
Ignore the people telling you to inject HGH. @MikeV12 is right about fasting, but you don't have to fast for days. 16:8 intermittent fasting is a good way to start. You'll have an 8 hour feeding window, then a 16 hour fasting window. I usually skip dinner when I do IF, and while I'm hungry around 8pm, the hunger usually goes away by time I fall asleep. While I'm not overweight, I use IF to keep a lean look and to increase energy levels. There are all kinds of other health benefits to IF which you can research if interested. The human body was designed to go long periods of time without food during our hunter-gathering days, and IF seems to benefit metabolism and hormones as well, including natural HGH and testosterone.
 
The original post asked for motivation, and has mainly gotten diet advice.

For motivation, I think there are two kinds of people around today: Those who live to escape reality, and those who build a reality they do not care to escape from.

Those escapers fill their days with bad TV, endless hours on Facebook and YouTube, if they read they read fluff, and they try to satiate themselves with food, alcohol, sexual stimulation, and drugs. They tend to be lazy, and instead of taking a well-earned break after hard work, they just skip to the break as a way to distract from the work undone. Spiritually, they tend to be guilty of sloth, they take the easy way out by being agnostic, or they adopt therapeutic deism.

Those who build their reality take care of things as they arise, have long term goals, do not waste time on frivolities, do not look for food or drink or drugs as distractions, and are always striving to improve themselves spiritually, mentally, and physically. Time for enjoyment is after the work is done, and they can derive some contentment over what they have accomplished.

You can be one or the other, and if you are motivated to be the latter then do not look back.


Back to advice, if you can be become a gym rat, then great, but if that does not work, then do get exercise however you can. If you have the room for it, think about getting the stuff for a boxing workout. Spend a few minutes hitting a heavy bag, a few minutes jumping rope, a few minutes on the speed bag, do some push ups, do some sit ups. Do half an hour of that a day and you'll be in great shape and punching a heavy bag helps to de-stress. You can get a small timer that beeps for each interval and with a break in-between. It only takes a corner of a garage. I like this place for boxing supplies: Title Boxing

Regarding diet advice, personally I like the Keto diet. And it is not zero carb. Other than living only on meat, there really is no carb-free diet. And even that is not completely carb-free, as one's body can convert protein to carbs. Keto is a carb reduced diet where grams of carbs are no higher than a certain fraction of carbs of fat. And broccoli, Romaine lettuce, Brussel sprouts, green beans, blue berries in moderation, etc., are Keto. At any rate, I would give it an honest try for a few months, and if it does not work, then try something else. Everyone is different.

What went off the rails in the 20th century was the idea that all animal fat was bad and was to be replaced with factory-made seed oils, that meat was best limited, and that high-carb foods were basically harmless. Thus the standard American diet has 30% of its calories from factory oil and sugar alone, and about 85% of grains that are consumed are refined and refined grain has little of nutritional value. The end result is never ending inflammation (factory oils) that probably leads to cancer and other ills, and insulin spikes (sugar and refined grains) that lead to metabolic syndrome and ultimately to heart disease.
 

GodfatherPartTwo

Kingfisher
I used to work 12 hours a day in a toxic warehouse. Evening till morning on my feet. I also used to take every overtime shift to the point that management hated me. 12 hours a day/6 days a week. I didn't get good sleep and sometimes I would even fast for days here and there. Sometimes OMAD (one meal a day).

My only vice during that were the Camels. Not exactly a healthy combo but I got in very good shape. The discipline? I didn't have a choice, I forced it upon myself. The motivation? Would be lying if I said the increased attention from women didn't help but truthfully my main motivator was God. I asked Him for strength and I devoted my hunger pangs, my sleep pangs, and everything else to Him. I studied and mediated on His Word all the time at work and I found it always to be sufficient to get me through whatever I was feeling in the body.
 

Lights

Woodpecker
look at long term view and not sprint. build a sustainable and enjoyable lifestyle

check out greg doucettes videos for good diet ideas.

look at your diet and things you like and plan good healthy substitutes for them. This will be more sustainable in long term. like if you have a sweet tooth you need to address

cut out red meat and stick to light proteins like fish and sometimes chicken, stay light on carbs.

season your food so it tastes good but not too good. create healthy subs for sweets, like peanut butter/banana apples fruits et cetera

snack on low calorie popcorn and salads

do low impact cardio that will not spike your appetite. walking is really good for this. you can start with 10,000 steps per day and work up to 30,000. This takes like 4-5 hours at around 15,000 your dopamine and pleas\ure spikes

recommend leave weights alone and focus on calisthenics. weights will stoke your appetite too much . stick with burpees, pushups body squats and pullups, high repitions will burn calories. maybe throw on a weight vest while walking . calisthenics make you storng

cut all sugar flour and caffeine and give your self time to detox. its ok to lay around

throw in some hardcore dry fasts and salt water fasts here and there but dont kill yourself with this.

give yourself time to heal and adjust to your new lifestyle and make it gradual but steady progress.

the lethal combo is cleaning up and tightening up your diet and torching calories with slow steady cardio, not HIIT. hit will stoke your appetitte too much.
 
I wrote a health and fitness chapter on this problem in my second book. I think most people start off wrong. They immediately join a gym which works for awhile.

Obviously it's not that simple or the obesity rate wouldn't be projected to hit 80% by 2030.

Exercise should not be used for weight loss. You have to clean up your diet. However, that's not sustainable unless you shift to a more active lifestyle. Otherwise you go back to eating for entertainment.

So that means you need some kind of manly recreational hobby like golf and surfing. I wrote chapters on how to start both of those, too. So now your diet is good and you're getting serotonin and dopamine from fun activities that don't include sitting at a desk or in front of a screen. They're actually two of the oldest recreational sports, too. Quite a rich history and industry built up around them.

Now you should actually join a gym. You'll have a purpose to your training. Some guys are narcissists who can workout to look like Arnold. Most are not--we just don't care about that. Besides building and maintaining serious muscle bulk takes years. It's like a college degree. How committed are you to being a muscle freak?

So you can actually train for general fitness and to be better at an activity. The reason I suggest golf and surfing is because they are really the only two sports you can do until your an old man. Therefore if you learn them in your 30s or 40s it's still worthwhile. You have another 30-40 years of fun.

I have friends who love tennis. That's better for meeting women. But I find it boring and it's partner dependent. Golf and surfing can be done alone and you'll have just as much fun.

As a bonus they are both compatible with travel and being successful. Golf basically gives you an instant group of successful educated men to pal around with. Surfing is a mostly younger demographic of backpacker types but has all types of cool guys, too.

The reason you don't start with these sports is they are too hard. You need to get active first by walking around your neighborhood. My routine when I move to a new location is to jog to the nearest park and scope out the playground for bodyweight activities. I may spend a week or two using different gyms on a day pass before I settle on one.

This way you have a travel routine that's active and recreational. It's nearly impossible to get knocked out unless you're in polluted cities where jogging is actually unhealthy. People argue with on AQI but anything above 140, I won't jog. I want my lungs healthy for life.

Throw a 2 dollar jump rope in your bag. You can sometimes skip rope inside your Airbnb. I can in mine now--just barely.

I only skip rope to get my heart rate above 100 for a few minutes in he morning. Better than coffee. But I love coffee too.

So, basically I wouldn't put too much focus on the gym until you have a good diet and hobby. You should know exactly how many grams of carbs, protein, fat, fiber, and mg of sodium you're getting each day. Or I wouldnt bother with the gym.

You'd be better off making money. That's the ultimate flex nowadays. Especially if you stay in the USA, working out isn't worth it because only 3-4% of women are doing it and you're competing against teenagers who look like Arnold.

Hard to stay motivated...
 
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For motivation nothing beats hatred. When you struggle to lift those 100 dumbbells picture your worst enemy, now envision that every time you complete a set you punch the POS. Remember hate early, hate often and hate hard.
 

Uponthisrock

Sparrow
At my heaviest I was around 260 (5'11") in my mid 20's. I'm currently 180 in my late 30's (31" waist) and feeling better than ever.
I got put on some heavy duty meds as a teenager and that really threw my weight out of whack and then I just got complacent for a long time.
In my late 20's I decided to make a change. Nothing big at first. Literally started getting smaller sizes at fast food places. Ya that was step 1.
I think most people set unrealistic goals and when they can't meet them they give up. So I set really small goals at first.
I started to walk 3 miles a day on a trail in the hills.
During the walk I set really small goals. "Run to that tree over there", the next I'd run a little further and maybe run 3 or 4 times during the walk. After some time and dedication I was running the whole way.
I changed up my diet. Eating eggs, lots of vegitables and meats, mostly chicken and fish. Tried to stay away from sugar and carbs. Little to no bread or rice.
Only ate dinner and two small snacks. Smoked almonds, pepperoni and mozzarella cheese. I drank a lot of Perrier (I like bubbles).
I never felt like I was starving, but it did take some fine tuning.
I cycled on and off that diet. One on one off for about a year.
I started to purchase weights for my home and I work out 3 to 4 times a week, sometimes more. That gave me more leeway to eat more foods while maintaining my health.
I'd even spend a lot of money on clothes that were just a little to small and throw away they ones that fit well.
Even during covid I have maintained good health and I'm getter better by the day.
 
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